» » Domesticating Revolution: From Socialist Reform to Ambivalent Transition in a Bulgarian Village

Download Domesticating Revolution: From Socialist Reform to Ambivalent Transition in a Bulgarian Village fb2

by Gerald W. Creed
Download Domesticating Revolution: From Socialist Reform to Ambivalent Transition in a Bulgarian Village fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    Gerald W. Creed
  • ISBN:
    0271017139
  • ISBN13:
    978-0271017136
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Penn State University Press; 1 edition (November 13, 1997)
  • Pages:
    320 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1733 kb
  • ePUB format
    1828 kb
  • DJVU format
    1876 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    733
  • Formats:
    mobi docx azw doc


This book gives the reader a ground-up view of how socialist economics worked for ordinary villagers in the late 1980s and how they reacted to and interpreted the subsequent transition.

It clearly demonstrates why ethnographic methods are essential to understanding events since 1989: such methods reveal how daily practice ‘domesticates’ both socialism and its aftermath, disrupting the calculus of policies imposed from above. This book gives the reader a ground-up view of how socialist economics worked for ordinary villagers in the late 1980s and how they reacted to and interpreted the subsequent transition. The scholarship is superior and the work is a major contribution to East European and (post) Soviet studies. Carol Silverman, University of Oregon.

Domesticating Revolution book. The collapse of state socialism in 1989 focused attention on the. Gerald Creed is the only American anthropologist to have conducted extended fieldwork in a single Bulgarian village both during and after the socialist era. This work has enabled him to document the precise connections between socialist practice and postsocialist developments.

University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1998. This paper explores the concept of domestication as a way of attending to urban public spaces and the ways in which they come to be inhabited. ix. 304 p. illustrations, tables, bibliography, index. It argues against the tendency in urban scholarship to use the term pejoratively and interchangeably with words like pacification or taming to express concerns relating to the corrosion of public life. Rather, the aim here is to develop domestication as a concept attentive to the processes by which people go about making a home in the city. University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1998. Katsuhiko thesis supervisor.

publisher "Slavica Publishers", } ty - jour. Creed's Domesticating Revolution: From Socialist Reform to Ambivalent Transition in a Bulgarian Village. AU - Buchanan, Donna A. Py - 1999.

Domesticating Revolution: From Socialist Reforms to Ambivalent Transition in a Bulgarian Villageby Gerald W. Creed. Published: 1 December 1998. in Political Science Quarterly. Political Science Quarterly, Volume 113, pp 750-751; doi:10.

University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1997.

Domesticating Revolution: From Socialist Reform to Ambivalent Transition in a Bulgarian Village. University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1997.

Pennsylvania: Pennsylvania State University Press. xvi + 304 pp. P. £1. 5. ISBN 0 271 01713 9. DEEMA KANEFF (a1). University of Cambridge.

The collapse of state socialism in 1989 focused attention on the transition to democracy and capitalism in Eastern Europe. But for many people who actually lived through the transition, the changes were often disappointing. Perhaps none were more disappointed than the villagers of rural Bulgaria whose very lifestyles and identities were threatened by the transition. Domesticating Revolution explains this unexpected outcome through a detailed study of economic reform in one Bulgarian village, from the beginning of collectivization in the 1940s to decollectivization efforts in the 1990s.

Gerald Creed is the only American anthropologist to have conducted extended fieldwork in a single Bulgarian village both during and after the socialist era. This work has enabled him to document the precise connections between socialist practice and postsocialist developments. He suggests that by simply doing what they could to improve their difficult lot under socialism, Bulgarian villagers gradually domesticated the socialist system. This very achievement, however, set the stage for an ambivalent transition after 1989 as villagers sought to defend their earlier gains against new threats. Ironically, they appealed to domesticated socialism in a failed effort to domesticate the transition as well.

Domesticating Revolution will force scholars to rethink both their models of state socialism and their interpretations of the transition.


Kagda
Once you get by some of the academic gobbledygook, this book delivers great insight into the challenges of a Bulgarian village making the economic transition. Creed has obviously 'lived the life' there, as opposed to just parachuting in for a couple weeks. I lived there too and can attest to the veracity of his observations. This is about the best book I can think of for anyone who wants to really know about the people and lifestyle of Bulgaria over the last 40 years.
Winawel
This is an excellent book by an anthropologist who managed to do field work in Bulgaria before 1989. Creed lived in the village and witnessed the transition process first hand. He gives an excellent account of the changes told through rich ethnographic prose.
Welahza
I'm an anthropology student at Hunter College in New York. Professor Creed teaches here, and this semester I took his "Families and Households in Anthropology" Class. He's an amazing professor, and I look forward to reading this book. If his class reflects anything in the book, I am sure it will be great!