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by William H. Thomas Jr.
Download Unsafe for Democracy: World War I and the U.S. Justice Department's Covert Campaign to Suppress Dissent (Studies in American Thought and Culture) fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    William H. Thomas Jr.
  • ISBN:
    0299228908
  • ISBN13:
    978-0299228903
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    University of Wisconsin Press; 1 edition (October 8, 2008)
  • Pages:
    264 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1556 kb
  • ePUB format
    1527 kb
  • DJVU format
    1294 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    844
  • Formats:
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During World War I it was the task of the . .

During World War I it was the task of the . Unsafe for Democracy" is a powerful object lesson in the abuses that can result from overzealous "defenders" of national prerogatives.

Unsafe for Democracy book. Best Books for Special Interests, selected by the American Association of School Librarians. During the First World War it was the task of the . In Unsafe for Democracy, historian William H. Thomas Jr. shows that the Justice Department did not stop at this official charge but went much fu During the First World War it was the task of the .

In Unsafe for Democracy, historian William H. shows that the Justice Department did not stop at this official charge but went much further-paying cautionary visits to suspected dissenters, pressuring them to express support of the war effort, or intimidating them into. shows that the Justice Department did not stop at this official charge but went much further-paying cautionary visits to suspected dissenters, pressuring them to express support of the war effort, or intimidating them into silence.

Recommend this journal.

Thomas, William . Jr. Unsafe for Democracy: World War I and the . Justice Department's Covert Campaign to Suppress Dissent. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 2008). Strauss, Lon: Social Conflict and Control, Protest and Repression (USA), in: 1914-1918-online. International Encyclopedia of the First World War.

World War I and the . Studies in American thought and culture. by Thomas, William H. Published 2008 by University of Wisconsin Press in Madison, Wis.

Studies on justice-oriented classrooms and teaching about controversy are cited to show the irrelevance of.

Studies on justice-oriented classrooms and teaching about controversy are cited to show the irrelevance of curricula that ignore injustice, the benefits of engaging controversies in history, and the way in which studying injustice in history prepares students to actively oppose current injustices. The five characteristics that support critical thinking about justice and history (CTJH) are then implemented in a series of lessons and a culminating task the demonstrate how CTJH could be implemented in a . history unit on western expansion.

First World War. campaign. World War I. Democracy. 2010 ; Vol. 28, No. 1. pp. 284-285. Justice Department’s Covert Campaign to Suppress Dissent by William H. Thomas J.

Unsafe for Democracy : World War I and the U. S. Justice Department’s Covert Campaign to Suppress Dissent, University of Wisconsin Press, 2008. action?docID 3444892. Birth Control Movement.

During the First World War it was the task of the U.S. Department of Justice, using the newly passed Espionage Act and its later Sedition Act amendment, to prosecute and convict those who opposed America’s entry into the conflict. In Unsafe for Democracy, historian William H. Thomas Jr. shows that the Justice Department did not stop at this official charge but went much further—paying cautionary visits to suspected dissenters, pressuring them to express support of the war effort, or intimidating them into silence. At times going undercover, investigators tried to elicit the unguarded comments of individuals believed to be a threat to the prevailing social order.In this massive yet largely secret campaign, agents cast their net wide, targeting isolationists, pacifists, immigrants, socialists, labor organizers, African Americans, and clergymen. The unemployed, the mentally ill, college students, schoolteachers, even schoolchildren, all might come under scrutiny, often in the context of the most trivial and benign activities of daily life.            Delving into numerous reports by Justice Department detectives, Thomas documents how, in case after case, they used threats and warnings to frighten war critics and silence dissent. This early government crusade for wartime ideological conformity, Thomas argues, marks one of the more dubious achievements of the Progressive Era—and a development that resonates in the present day.Best Books for Special Interests, selected by the American Association of School Librarians“Recommended for all libraries.”—Frederic Krome, Library Journal

Malodred
This a crazy book, its like the wild west. So many things you would not believe the government capable of but the way things used to be. Its very scholarly with lots of direct sources rather then author commentary. It is like he is reading police reports for awhile.
Yananoc
If you think the government is breathing down our necks since 9/11 or the McCarthy Era was paranoid, revisit America during WWI and get a new perspective.
zmejka
Do you think you live in times that do not respect constitutional rights? Well, try reading this book.

How would you like to be visited by a government agent, by someone who identifies himself as a government agent, identifies the agency he (back then it was always a "he") works for who then commences to convince why you should buy war bonds, or why you should not speak any language but English, or why you should be in favor of the war, or why you should never say anything against the president or against the war, or ask you questions like, "Are you patriotic?" "Do you love this country" "Why don't you go to church more often?" or "Why don't show some respect for that American flag?"

This government agent could show up at your home, at your work, or at your church. And in the course of that visit, that government agent would end his visit by saying something like this, "Remember, you're not doing anything wrong now, ... but don't make me show up again; we're watching you," while he walks away.

Pretty outrageous, huh? Think this is fiction? Something out of Orwell? Well, think again.

At a particular time and place in this country such visits and conversations were common, all too common, apparently. These and other events are meticulously described by William H. Thomas, Jr., in this brilliant, historically detailed, yet troubling book about the concerted effort of the Wilson adminstration to employ private investigators, government hack agents, and agent provocateurs --- the most banal of the banal --- to bolster support of America's entry into WWI and at the same time stifle dissent of this unpopular war, all under the protection of the Espionage Act. The targets were intellectuals, minorities, women who were "uppity," working class people, Bolshiveks, immigrants, "foreignors" ... and of course, especially, German-Americans.

If all of this all too sounds familiar, it should, because, as the 60s and recent events testify, we all live under the long shadow of the Espionage Act. The egregiousness of the government's intermeddling into the constitional rights of ordinary citizens during the Wilson years dwarf the subsequent evils wrought by the CIA, FBI, NSA, or other like-minded agencies or agents during the 60s, 70s, and thereafter, ... although the more recent violators (I won't name names) certainly learned a lot from the characters in this book!

This book gives constitutional perspective, however, because as bad as things may be now, the Espionage Act, Thomas states, was spawned at a time when First Amendment rights WAS NOT EVEN RECOGNIZED.

A truly recommended and worthwhile book.
Balhala
In crisis the citizens of the United States have too often allowed their baser instincts to take over and curtail our normal emphasis on civil liberty. We did it in with the Alien and Sedition Acts during the presidency of John Adams and during the Patriot Act in the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks during the presidency of George W. Bush. This fine account tells the story of one instance in which we also enthusiastically curtailed civil liberties through the passage of the Espionage Act and the later Sedition Act during World War I to enable the prosecution and jailing of those who opposed U.S. entry into the war. These acts served as cover for a series of more aggressive actions, cautionary visits to suspected dissenters, pressure tactics on groups to support the war effort, and intimidation to silence of those thought not fully committed to the war.

Author Williams H. Thomas Jr. describes how this expansion of authority was used with abandon to go after marginalized groups, to force into submission socialists, communists, labor organizers, pacifists, immigrants, racial and ethnic minorities, and even students and clergy who leaned toward the peace movement. Many of the incursions were little more than hasslings at the local level, relating to often trivial and benign activities.

The author uncovers a systematic effort to frighten critics of the war into submission and to silence any type of dissent. We are familiar with this effort in the Red Scare raids of A. Mitchell Palmer in the aftermath of the war. What Thomas does is show that those were not unique and that the latitude with which agency of the U.S. Department of Justice pursued presumed subversives was broad. Using many case studies, this work documents a level of coercion and force that should send up chills in all readers. "Unsafe for Democracy" is a powerful object lesson in the abuses that can result from overzealous "defenders" of national prerogatives.