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by Robin Hard,Christopher Gill,Epictetus
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Humanities
  • Author:
    Robin Hard,Christopher Gill,Epictetus
  • ISBN:
    0199595186
  • ISBN13:
    978-0199595181
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Oxford University Press; Critical ed. edition (March 1, 2014)
  • Pages:
    400 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1601 kb
  • ePUB format
    1242 kb
  • DJVU format
    1561 kb
  • Rating:
    4.1
  • Votes:
    508
  • Formats:
    azw docx lit lrf


Epictetus' Discourses have been the most widely read and influential of all writings of Stoic philosophy, from antiquity .

Epictetus' Discourses have been the most widely read and influential of all writings of Stoic philosophy, from antiquity onwards. They set out the core ethical principles of Stoicism in a form designed to help people put them into practice and to use them as a basis for leading a good human life. Epictetus was a teacher, and a freed slave, whose discourses have a vivid informality, animated by anecdotes and dialogue.

Epictetus' Discourses have been the most widely read and influential of all writings of Stoic philosophy, from antiquity . This is the only complete modern translation of the Discourses, together with the Handbook or manual of key themes, and surviving fragments.

Confessions (Oxford World's Classics) by Saint Augustine Paperback . You can, of course, purchase this book which includes both the Discourses and the Handbook.

This book is an extended variation on the stoic philosophy of Epictetus best captured by this passage from the first entry of his Handbook: Some things are up to us and others are not. Up to us are opinion, impulse, desire, aversion, and, in a word, whatever is our own action. It’s just that the Handbook alone provides a more manageable distillation of Epictetus's philosophy. You should definitely read one of them though.

Christopher Gill has written extensively on ancient philosophy, especially on Hellenistic and Roman ethics and psychology.

This Oxford World's Classic version is based on the 1925 Oldfather Loeb Greek .

Epictetus was born a slave around 50 . Later he was owned by a member of Nero's court in Rome. Arrian distilled Epictetus' main themes into a collection of passages titled the Handbook. Only four of the informal lectures, some fragments, and the Handbook remain. Matheson (Oxford), and Renato Laurenti's 1960 Italian translation (Bari).

Discourses, Fragments, Handbook book Again, in this situation I think Epictetus’s hard division between things outside or within our control blinds him to the dialogue between.

Discourses, Fragments, Handbook book. Again, in this situation I think Epictetus’s hard division between things outside or within our control blinds him to the dialogue between attitude and circumstances that comprise human life and happiness. The modern use of the word stoic -someone imperturbable, unemotional, unfeeling-is not entirely accurate as regards the original stoics.

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA. Book theme: Ancient & Classical. Author: Robin Hard & Christopher Gill. Street Date: March 1, 2014.

Discourses, Fragments, Handbook. Epictetus Robin Hard and Christopher Gill. Oxford World's Classics. The only complete modern translation of Epictetus' Discourses, the most widely read and influential of all Stoic writings, together with the Handbook, and fragments. Comprehensive notes include useful summaries of individual discourses.

'About things that are within our power and those that are not.'Epictetus' Discourses have been the most widely read and influential of all writings of Stoic philosophy, from antiquity onwards. They set out the core ethical principles of Stoicism in a form designed to help people put them into practice and to use them as a basis for leading a good human life. Epictetus was a teacher, and a freed slave, whose discourses have a vivid informality, animated by anecdotes and dialogue. Forceful, direct, and challenging, their central message is that the basis of happiness is up to us, and that we all have the capacity, through sustained reflection and hard work, of achieving this goal. They still speak eloquently to modern readers seeking meaning in their own lives.This is the only complete modern translation of the Discourses, together with the Handbook or manual of key themes, and surviving fragments. Robin Hard's accurate and accessible translation is accompanied by Christopher Gill's full introduction and comprehensive notes.About the Series: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the broadest spectrum of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, voluminous notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.

Friert
Previous translations of Epictetus' Discourses and Enchiridion are stuffy and strange in parts. Robin Hard's translation manages to both preserve the original meanings as well as be very understandable for the contemporary reader.

Reading the Discourses, it's as if you are in Epictetus' philosophical school in Ancient Rome, learning to become a Stoic. If you are interested in Stoicism and potentially living as a Stoic, Epictetus' Discourses -- and this translation specifically -- is the place to get the juicy philosophical ideas in their full glory. Marcus Aurelius' Meditations, while wonderful, does not portray a complete philosophy but only the journal entries of a practitioner. Seneca's letters, while eloquent and wise, are a mix of Stoic and Epicurean thinking and thus sacrifice the purity of hard core Stoicism found in Epictetus.

I highly recommend reading this edition of the Discourses slowly, contemplating their meaning and how you might apply them into your daily life, then using the Handbook as it was intended: as a summary of the key points in the Discourses.
Whatever
Robin Hard gives a good translation. While paperback Everyman edition is ever so slightly better, this one is still great to have on your Kindle and is easier to read than George Long's version, which is still great, just a little harder to read. Also, there were no problems with the Kindle formatting.
Moonworm
Very informative, but it can be difficult reading times. The grammar is a bit too tight and some sections don't flow very smoothly.
Diab
The translation is very good. Modern, but not too dumbed down, and the price is excellent for what you are getting.
MOQ
I read Oxford Press books whenever possible. I think, overall, they have the most accurate yet modern translations.

I suggest reading the "Handbook" portion of the book first, (it's located at the end). I think it's a great rundown of Stoicism. It gives mental exercises, and a kind of brief genealogical of stoic thought. The Discourse portion provides a deeper explanation in essay format.
Goldendragon
An important addition to the Stoic-in-training
Ddilonyne
Required reading for anyone interested in Stoism. Like this translation for the Westerner.
Great translation, great notes. This is, in my opinion, the best translation available.