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by Julian Go
Download Patterns of Empire: The British and American Empires, 1688 to the Present fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    Julian Go
  • ISBN:
    1107011833
  • ISBN13:
    978-1107011830
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Cambridge University Press (October 10, 2011)
  • Pages:
    302 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1567 kb
  • ePUB format
    1494 kb
  • DJVU format
    1310 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    487
  • Formats:
    lrf mobi lrf lit


Because Julian Go attacks the idea of American exceptionalism that is widely bandied about in political circles. Go compares the US with the British Empire at equivalent times, and finds that both empires follow general patterns over the rise and fall of their spheres of influence

Because Julian Go attacks the idea of American exceptionalism that is widely bandied about in political circles. Go compares the US with the British Empire at equivalent times, and finds that both empires follow general patterns over the rise and fall of their spheres of influence. Right now, the USA is swinging wildly in the Middle East, causing chaos wherever it enters the scene militarily. From Afghanistan to Iraq to Libya, our involvement in those countries' affairs has made things demonstrably worse.

Patterns of Empire book. Go builds his study around American and British he In Patterns of Empire, Julian Go makes of a comparative study of the American and British Empires. Go rejects the American exceptionalist arguments that the United States never had an empire or that its empire has been exceptional in its liberal treatment of the colonized and its promotion of freedom and liberty. Instead, Go argues that the American Empire has been remarkably similar to the British Empire in its practice, policy, and conception.

In Patterns of Empire, Go compares the development of, and modes of rule in, the British and American . The comparative approach of Patterns of Empire poses both substantive and methodological challenges to the approaches of .

In Patterns of Empire, Go compares the development of, and modes of rule in, the British and American empires. Drawing from quantitative data on British and . colonization, annexations, and military interventions, as well as secondary literature, Go traces the imperial practices of the states from the late seventeenth century to the present. It challenges the fundamental assumptions at the core of America’s historic and present imperial consciousness.

Request PDF On May 6, 2013, C. McGranahan and others published JULIAN GO. Patterns of Empire: The . Presents two hundred charted needlework designs by Anne Orr, including one hundred in color, featuring flowers, children, animals, and other motifs. Patterns of Empire: The British and American Empires, 1688 to the Present. Changes in distribution patterns of select wintering North American birds from 1901 to 1989. January 1994 · Studies in Avian Biology.

Julian Go. Download with Google. Patterns of Empire: the British and American Empires, 1688-present.

Patterns of empire comprehensively examines the two most powerful empires in. .

Patterns of empire comprehensively examines the two most powerful empires in modern history: the United States and Britain. Challenging the popular theory that the American empire is unique, Patterns of empire shows how the policies, practices, forms, and historical dynamics of the American empire repeat those of the British, leading up to the present climate of economic decline, treacherous intervention in the Middle East, and overextended imperial confidence.

Challenging the popular theory that the American empire is unique, Patterns of Empire shows how the policies, practices, forms, and historical dynamics of the American empire repeat those of the British, leading up to the present climate of economic decline, treacherous intervention in th.

Challenging the popular theory that the American empire is unique, Patterns of Empire shows how the policies, practices, forms, and historical dynamics of the American empire repeat those of the British, leading up to the present climate of economic decline, treacherous intervention in the Middle East, and overextended imperial confidence. A critical exercise in revisionist history and comparative social science, this book also offers a challenging theory of empire that recognizes the agency of non-Western peoples, the impact of global fields, and the limits of imperial power

Patterns of Empire comprehensively examines the two most powerful empires in modern history: the United . Julian Go is an Associate Professor of Sociology at Boston University. Challenging the popular theory that the American empire is unique, Patterns of Empire shows how the policies, practices, forms and historical dynamics of the American empire repeat those of the British, leading up to the present climate of economic decline, treacherous intervention in the Middle East and overextended imperial confidence. He is also a Faculty Affiliate in Asian Studies and New England and American Studies at Boston University. Patterns of Empire comprehensively examines the two most powerful empires in modern history: the United States and Britain.

Patterns of Empire comprehensively examines the two most powerful empires in modern history: the United States and Britain. Challenging the popular theory that the American empire is unique, Patterns of Empire shows how the policies, practices, forms, and historical dynamics of the American empire repeat those of the British, leading up to the present climate of economic decline, treacherous intervention in the Middle East, and overextended imperial confidence. A critical exercise in revisionist history and comparative social science, this book also offers a challenging theory of empire that recognizes the agency of non-Western peoples, the impact of global fields, and the limits of imperial power.

Tcaruieb
Because Julian Go attacks the idea of American exceptionalism that is widely bandied about in political circles. Go compares the US with the British Empire at equivalent times, and finds that both empires follow general patterns over the rise and fall of their spheres of influence. Right now, the USA is swinging wildly in the Middle East, causing chaos wherever it enters the scene militarily. From Afghanistan to Iraq to Libya, our involvement in those countries' affairs has made things demonstrably worse. In the late 1880s, British involvement in South Africa with the Boer Wars had a similar effect.

The only criticism of Go's excellent analysis is that he doesn't look at the UK's decolonialization of the 1950s. Comparing that time period to the inevitable future closure of a raft of American military bases all over the world would give us a better insight as to the challenges that the USA will face in the near term future.

It is obvious why this book has won so many prizes for political studies.
Ce
It's an interesting theme and story line, but does not really support a book of this length. I felt I got the point about one quarter of the way through.
Doulkree
An incredible book for our times. If you were anything like me, and thought America was the only good thing to come out of Britain besides the Beatles, read this now. You'll never look at America the same again.
Sharpbrew
Julian Go rehashes existing historical scholarship on British and American imperialism, offering little that is new, and almost no archival work of his own. Worse, he wraps his unoriginal narrative around sociological jargon that offers no new insights into the British and American empires. He uses a "Global Fields" analysis that treats history as a game with "players" and argues that this term creates the space to integrate many factors into a single analysis. But rather, all that it does is offer a vague buzzword. It offers no "mechanism of control," as Roger Louis, the imperial historian, calls it. No new methodology. No new insights. This book is merely a rehash of secondary material doused with jargon. Disappointing.