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by David Lamb
Download Vietnam, Now: A Reporter Returns fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    David Lamb
  • ISBN:
    1586480898
  • ISBN13:
    978-1586480899
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    PublicAffairs; 1 edition (May 2002)
  • Pages:
    288 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1502 kb
  • ePUB format
    1112 kb
  • DJVU format
    1269 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    575
  • Formats:
    rtf mobi doc txt


David Lamb's "Vietnam, Now" provides a balanced perspective on modern Vietnam. Lamb first worked as a UPI reporter in South Vietnam in 1968. He returned in 1997 as a correspondent for the Los Angeles Times and lived in Hanoi with his wife for four years.

David Lamb's "Vietnam, Now" provides a balanced perspective on modern Vietnam. Other recent books about modern Vietnam (such as Robert Templer's "Shadows and Wind" and Henry Kamm's "Dragon Ascending") seem to put a negative spin on everything in Vietnam. However, in "Vietnam, Now" David Lamb chooses to take a more realistic and slightly optimistic view.

When he left war-ravaged Vietnam some thirty years ago, journalist David Lamb averred "I didn't care if I ever saw .

A portrait of a beautiful country and a remarkable, determined people, Vietnam, Now is a personal journey that will change the way we think of Vietnam, and perhaps the war as well.

Vietnam, now : a reporter returns. Vietnam, now : a reporter returns. by. Lamb, David, 1940-. Asian, Middle Eastern history: postwar, from c 1945 -, Travel writing, al Relations, Description and travel, History - General History, Vietnam, Asia - Southeast Asia, Description, 1975-, History. New York : Public Affairs.

What he found was a country excited about moving forward, a people who held no grudge against the US and overall a feeling of optimism and hope for their developing country.

David Lamb was born in Boston, Massachusetts. Over The Hills: A Midlife Escape Across America By Bicycle. Vietnam, Now: A Reporter Returns. He then joined United Press International in San Francisco and Denver; from 1968 to 1970, he worked as a battlefront correspondent in Saigon. Roberts, Sam, "David Lamb, Author and War Correspondent in Vietnam, Dies at 76", New York Times, June 6, 2016.

For most Americans, writes veteran correspondent David Lamb, Vietnam was a war, not a country-even worse, it was sometimes merely an adjective, usually with . .But in 1997, he found himself living in Hanoi, in charge of the Los Angeles Times 's first peacetime bureau and in the midst of a country on the move, as it progresses toward a free-market economy and divorces itself from the restrictive, isolationist policies established at the end of the war.

Lamb talked about his latest book, Vietnam, Now: A Reporter Returns, published by PublicAffairs. In it, Mr. Lamb, who covered the Vietnam War and later lived in post-war Hanoi, talks about some notable aspects of life in the new Vietnam

Lamb talked about his latest book, Vietnam, Now: A Reporter Returns, published by PublicAffairs. Lamb, who covered the Vietnam War and later lived in post-war Hanoi, talks about some notable aspects of life in the new Vietnam. Mr. Lamb talked about his latest book, Vietnam, Now: A Reporter Returns, published by PublicAffairs

Thirty years after covering the Vietnam War as a combat correspondent, the author returns to Hanoi to explore modern Vietnam, examining the people, the land, the history, the culture, and the legacy of the war. Год: 2002. org to approved e-mail addresses. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

Vietnam, Now: A Reporter Returns – avtorji e-knjige: David Lamb. To knjigo lahko preberete z aplikacijo Knjige Google Play v računalniku s sistemom Windows, v sistemu Android, napravah s sistemom iOS. But in 1997, he found himself living in Hanoi, in charge of the Los Angeles Times's first peacetime bureau and in the midst of a country on the move, as it progresses toward a free-market economy and divorces itself from the restrictive, isolationist policies established at the end of the war.

Thirty years after covering the Vietnam War as a combat correspondent, the author returns to Hanoi to explore modern Vietnam, examining the people, the land, the history, the culture, and the legacy of the war.

Zieryn
This book melds the Vietnam we thought we knew in the war years with a portrait of a peacetime developing country. Lamb writes with great warmth about the reconciliation of Vietnamese and Americans. His book is now 15 years old, so it needs to be supplemented with information about recent developments, but it's message is timeless.
Bradeya
David Lamb gives a history of the war including American and Vietnamese perspective. His years spent after the war tells a lot about the country and its people today. I have visited both the North and the South in the last two years. The people are awesome. Where language fails me, their hugs, smiles and selfies taken with Americans shows a deep love and respect toward Americans. On my two visits, I loved Hanoi and the North
Dorintrius
I just completed a trip to Vietnam (returning vet) and the book was spot on. I've recommeded it several times.
Little Devil
Excellent history lesson- first hand review before, during and after.
Rufutes a lot of misinformation re: Vietnam soldiers/war.
Akinonris
Excellent insight into Vietnam. I just returned from touring Vietnam for a month and this book was like reliving the trip. If your planning a visit to Vietnam I highly recommend you read this book.
Isha
This is a fascinating review of the political aspects of the war in the US and Vietnam and how it has affected people personally. Lamb's style makes it readable and entertaining. Its impossible to keep some opinions out of a necessarily historical work, but I was there in '70-'71 and everything in the book seems accurate from my impressions and those of the Marines I served with. ...
komandante
As a historian of the Vietnamese Wars, this afterward of the War is a good read, One is shown the affects of what happened when the North Vietnamese tanks roll into Saigon. Huge amounts of Vietnamese flee and make a life in the West. A totalitarian government resides in the south that keeps the society tuned to a rigid bureaucracy. People starve. Slowly the leaders change their thinking and become more innovative in their rule. They adapt Western ideas and capitalism makes inroads into the country. American veterans return and a sort of forgiveness goes forth. This shows how Vietnam is healing after years of war, and poor government.

I like this book. Lamb seems taken in by the Vietnamese government. In the takeover after 1975, thousands died in the prison camps the Communists set up. Many people were detained that never resurfaced. This was not the bloodbath that happened in Cambodia, but it did occur. Lamb glances over this. Otherwise this is a good effect about the after affects of the Vietnam War.
David Lamb's "Vietnam, Now" provides a balanced perspective on modern Vietnam. Lamb first worked as a UPI reporter in South Vietnam in 1968. He returned in 1997 as a correspondent for the Los Angeles Times and lived in Hanoi with his wife for four years.
Other recent books about modern Vietnam (such as Robert Templer's "Shadows and Wind" and Henry Kamm's "Dragon Ascending") seem to put a negative spin on everything in Vietnam. However, in "Vietnam, Now" David Lamb chooses to take a more realistic and slightly optimistic view.
In his stories of life in Vietnam, he acknowledges the poverty of the people and corruption and stubbornness of the ruling old guard. However, he puts things in perspective.
As is the case in most books on Vietnam, a lot of stories are related to the American War: US veterans return to Vietnam for closure; North Vietnam war memorials are in good shape and the South Vietnam war memorials aren't; one son fought in the north and one in the south.
It's easy to see why some people have written negative reviews about this book. Some persons who have sacrificed and lost much in this country cannot acknowledge that anything good can exist in Vietnam while the communists are in charge.
Still, I recommend this book as a balanced perspective of modern Vietnam. If you do want another opinion of the country, I recommend Templer's "Shadows and Wind." Or, better yet, read both these books and then visit Vietnam the country and judge for yourself.