» » Fighting the Slave Trade: West African Strategies (Western African Studies)

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by Sylviane A. Diouf
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Humanities
  • Author:
    Sylviane A. Diouf
  • ISBN:
    0852554486
  • ISBN13:
    978-0852554487
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    James Currey (January 22, 2004)
  • Pages:
    270 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1899 kb
  • ePUB format
    1802 kb
  • DJVU format
    1509 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    489
  • Formats:
    lrf azw mobi docx


Fighting the Slave Trade provides a comprehensive and compelling interpretation of the West African . That being said I was dissapointed that the book does not discuss West African resistance to Europeans.

Benedetta Rossi, Progress in Development Studies. For example, the famed Senegalese King of Almammy in 1787 not only banned slavery but banned any slave being carried through his kingdom.

Fighting the Slave Trade provides a comprehensive and compelling interpretation of the West African .

Fighting the Slave Trade is the first book to explore in a systematic manner the strategies Africans used to. .

Fighting the Slave Trade is the first book to explore in a systematic manner the strategies Africans used to protect and defend themselves and their communities from the onslaught of the Atlantic slave trade and how they assaulted i. While most studies of the slave trade focus on the volume of captives and on their ethnic origins, the question of how the Africans organized their familial and communal lives to resist and assail it has not received adequate attention.

DOCUMENTING THE SLAVE TRADE The English in West Africa, 1681–1683 .

DOCUMENTING THE SLAVE TRADE The English in West Africa, 1681–1683: The Local Correspondence of the Royal African Company of England, 1681–1699. European nations and African political states traded material goods for human bodies along the coast of west Africa. In turn, upwards of 21 million Africans from west central Africa were transported to the New World as slaves.

This collection of thirteen case studies by international scholars examines the strategies whole societies adopted in opposition to slavery over a period of five centuries.

Fighting the Slave Trade: West African Strategies.

Fighting the Slave Trade

Fighting the Slave Trade. by Sylviane A. Diouf. This is the first book to explore in a systematic manner the strategies used by Africans to protect and defend themselves and their communities from the onslaught of the Atlantic slave trade and how they assaulted it. It concludes with a reflective epilogue on the memory of slavery. North America: Ohio U Press.

Fighting the Slave Trade. West African Strategies. Ed by Sylviane A. Ohio University Press, Athens; James Currey, Oxford 2003. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox. Fighting the Slave Trade.

Christopher Fyfe, Sylviane A. Published: 1 January 2004. Africa, Volume 74, pp 680-681; doi:10. Keywords: Sylviane, Diouf, ISBN, Fighting the Slave, slave trade, west African, Hard Covers, African Strategies, paperback. For questions or feedback, please reach us at support at scilit.

Introduction Sylviane A. Fighting the Slave Trade' seems a never-ending battle. Enslavement and the trade in slaves challenged West Africans to reinforce and define their own physical and cultural boundaries. Lacustrine Villages in South Benin as Refuge From the Slave Trade Elisée Soumonni. But we can still be grateful for these stimulating, revisionist papers which provide such a comprehensive view of how it was once fought in West Africa. Christopher Fyfe Africa: Journal of the International African Institute Edinburgh University Press. Different societies either participated in or thwarted the trade in humans in an effort to retain their own group integrity.

This is the first book to explore in a systematic manner the strategies used by Africans to protect and defend themselves and their communities from the onslaught of the Atlantic slave trade and how they assaulted it. It concludes with a reflective epilogue on the memory of slavery. North America: Ohio U Press

Samulkis
The book gives a lot if detailed accounts of the slave trade that you will not find in your public school classroom. One account or person I wish the book could have discuss was, Madam Tinibu. The book will give you excellent intro into the slave trade!!
Vudozilkree
This book is in fact not written by Diouf but is a collection of over a dozen different essays that discuss how slavery affected West Africa. The book automatically wins points for simply addressing this topic, especially because most books about African enslavement are about its existence in the Western Hemisphere.

This book helps bring to light the fact that West Africans did not go quietly into slavery and revolt only upon reaching the Americas. This book focuses on ways in which some ethnic groups resisted enslavement and capture by other ethnic groups in West Africa.

That being said I was dissapointed that the book does not discuss West African resistance to Europeans. For example, the famed Senegalese King of Almammy in 1787 not only banned slavery but banned any slave being carried through his kingdom. As a result the French( with the recruitment of Arabophone Moors) destroyed his kingdom; nevertheless he is a magnificent example of West African enlightenment.

Furthermore, the book does explain the political fragmentation of the coast as a major factor for the development of the Atlantic Slave Trade, but it does not discuss the Guns for Slaves policy that Europeans enacted to ensure a supply of captives. The policy states that the only way the West African traders would get guns (which was the primary trading item for slaves and not "trinkets" as so many people think)was by giving captives, not even gold would suffice. This put the West African merchants and rulers in a predicament: if they chose not to go along with this policy yet their neighbors do, where do you think the gun holding neighbors would get their captives from? This along the fact that West Africans did not have factories to produce the guns at the rate of Europeans made it nearly impossible for the slave trade to not flourish. The fact that this book does not mention the dynamics of this is quite dissapointing.

It is surely the case that the reason the book does not address these issues is because, despite as progressive as Western society is claiming to be, the Eurocentric academy demands that responsibility for the Atlantic Slave Trade must remain primarily in the hands of Africans. They assert that any attempt to pay homage to those Africans who opposed it or to highlight the instigation of the trade by Europeans is not scholarly work, but African "romanticism".

Black scholars working for Eurocentric institutions dread this label--romantic--because it discredits their professionalism and academic integrity. Thus they validate their credibility as a scholar by saying "I am not afraid to take full responsibility for the slave trade." Many scholars, such as Gates and Appiah, fall victim to this.

The problem with this is that we are still not having a balance discussion. We are still forced in Eurocentric circles to promote a history of an African villian culture and any African who has integrity and challenges Europeans cannot be real, but a romantic character made to give African people undeserved dignity. We will never have all or even most of the stories of those valiant Africans, both commoners and royalty, who opposed the Atlantic slave trade, but we do have some, and no matter how "romantic" we are accused of being for acknowledging them, they remain some of our race's most heroic figures and must be celebrated.