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by Clare Downham
Download Viking Kings of Britain and Ireland: The Dynasty of Ivarr to A.D. 1014 fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    Clare Downham
  • ISBN:
    1906716064
  • ISBN13:
    978-1906716066
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Dunedin Academic Press (October 3, 2008)
  • Pages:
    358 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1785 kb
  • ePUB format
    1115 kb
  • DJVU format
    1621 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    471
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Vikings plagued the coasts of Ireland and Britain in the 790s.

Vikings plagued the coasts of Ireland and Britain in the 790s. Over time, their raids became more intense and by the mid-ninth century vikings had established a number of settlements in Ireland and Britain and had become heavily involved with local politics. A particularly successful viking leader named Aivarr campaigned on both sides of the Irish Sea in the 860s. His descendants dominated the major seaports of Ireland and challenged the power of kings in Britain during the later ninth and tenth centuries.

Vikings plagued the coasts of Ireland and Britain in the 790s A.

Vikings plagued the coasts of Ireland and Britain in the 790s AD. Over time, their raids became more intense and by the mid 9th century, Vikings had established a number of settlements in Ireland and Britain and had become heavily involved with local politics. This book provides a political analysis of the deeds of à varr's family, from their first appearance in Insular records down to the year 1014.

DUNEDIN Downham Vikings plagued the coasts of Ireland and Britain in the 790s

DUNEDIN Downham Vikings plagued the coasts of Ireland and Britain in the 790s. A particularly successful viking leader named Ívarr campaigned on both sides of the Irish Sea in the 860s. In 1014, the battle of Clontarf marked a famous stage in the decline of viking power in Ireland whilst the conquest of England in 1013 by the Danish king Sveinn Forkbeard marked a watershed in the history of vikings in Britain.

Journal Scandinavian Journal of History: Volume 34, Issue 1. Status. Viking Kings of Britain and Ireland: the dynasty of Ivarr to AD 1014, Clare Downham, Edinburgh, Dunedin Academic Press, 2007, xxii + 338 pp. 1906716064. Professor Richard Oram. Dean of Faculty of Arts and Humanities, History.

Download PDF book format. Vikings Great Britain Ireland Kings and rulers Kings and rulers, Medieval. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Viking kings of Britain and Ireland : the dynasty of Ivarr to . Book's title: Viking kings of Britain and Ireland : the dynasty of Ivarr to . Library of Congress Control Number: 2008399763. Download now Viking kings of Britain and Ireland : the dynasty of Ivarr to . Download PDF book format. Download DOC book format.

Books will be free of page markings . The dynasty of the Viking leader Ivarr dominated the major seaports of Ireland and challenged the power of kings in Britain during the later ninth and tenth centuries. The present volume provides a political analysis of the family's deeds, from their first appearance in insular records down to the year 1014. gives us the history of the dynasty from contemporary and near contemporary sources and brings to bear the fruits of thirty years intense scholarship that has emerged since Smyth wrote, a period in which the study of Early Insular History has been revolutionised.

Home Browse Books Book details, Viking Kings of Britain and Ireland . In Ireland the inhabitants of viking-settlements were called 'Foreigners' (Gaill, echtrainn, allmuire), until they were displaced by a different group o. .

Home Browse Books Book details, Viking Kings of Britain and Ireland: The Dynasty. Viking Kings of Britain and Ireland: The Dynasty of Ivarr to . In Ireland the inhabitants of viking-settlements were called 'Foreigners' (Gaill, echtrainn, allmuire), until they were displaced by a different group of foreigners in 1171. Nevertheless, from the tenth century, when inhabitants of the viking-settlements in Ireland went abroad, they were sometimes identified with the land of their abode.

A particularly successful viking leader named Ivarr campaigned on both sides of the Irish Sea in the 860s. This book provides a political analysis of the deeds of Ivarr's family from their first appearance in Insular records down to the year 1014. His descendants dominated the major seaports of Ireland Vikings plagued the coasts of Ireland and Britain in the 790s. By the mid-ninth century vikings had established a number of settlements in Ireland and Britain and had become heavily involved with local politics.

Although the second (Irish and English) chapter of this story is likely to be correct (Downham 2007), the assumption of early Scandinavian settlement in Atlantic Scotland cannot yet be supported on the basis of reliable evidence. The 'wave of advance' model is ultimately traceable to post-Viking Age Icelandic and Norwegian sources in which early pirate settlements in the Northern Isles were assumed to have existed (. What caused the Viking Age? Article.

May not be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher, except fair uses permitted under . Viking Kings of Britain and Ireland : The Dynasty of Ivarr to AD 1014. Dunedin Academic Press,.

Vikings plagued the coasts of Ireland and Britain in the 790s. By the mid-ninth century vikings had established a number of settlements in Ireland and Britain and had become heavily involved with local politics. A particularly successful viking leader named Ivarr campaigned on both sides of the Irish Sea in the 860s. His descendants dominated the major seaports of Ireland and challenged the power of kings in Britain during the later ninth and tenth centuries. This book provides a political analysis of the deeds of Ivarr's family from their first appearance in Insular records down to the year 1014. Such an account is necessary in light of the flurry of new work that has been done in other areas of Viking Studies. In line with these developments Clare Downham provides a reconsideration of events based on contemporary written accounts.

Galanjov
Very informative look on viking affairs in the Irish sea region. Good use of sources both primary and secondary
Thank you
Gelgen
Well-researched, and very readable. A great addition to our knowledge of the Viking Age.
Akelevar
The purpose of this book is to tell the true story of the dynasty of Ivarr, a Viking warlord who was, with some of his brothers and others, one of the leaders of the Viking Great Army that conquered Northumbria, East Anglian and Mercia in the 860s. He also besieged and took Dumbarton in 870 before taken control of Dublin. Over the next decades, until AD 1014 (and even afterwards), his descendants ruled, with various fortunes and at various times, Northumbria, Man, the Viking towns of Dublin and Limerick, the Hebrides and the northern part of Wales.

The author, who clearly knows her subject, has a fascinating and little-known story of alliances, treasons, feuds and wars to tell. Many interesting features come to light, such as the fact that Vikings were frequently allied with local powers against others, with the battle of Clontarf being one example among many since Vikings fought both for and against Brian Boru. Another interesting feature is that Ivarr's dynasty, whose importance is mostly ignored, finally lost out against Alfred and his successors but also against the Irish kinds, and this was at least partly because Ivarr's descendants weakened themselves by fighting against each other.

Another remarkable feature of this book is to show to what extent these "Vikings" (for want of a better term, as the author explains at length) had an eye for choosing strategic sites and successfully attacking their targets. A related feature is to illustrate to what extent their attacks were damageable and can close to overwhelming Alba, Wessex and the Irish kingdoms.

There are however some problems with this book. First, it is difficult to read, largely because it is not written for a general audience. For instance, there are long discussions in which the author rebuts the views held by some of her colleagues, without necessarily explaining in detail what these views might be.

Also, the book's structure, with a first section made into a historical overview and outline and subsequent sections detailing the activities of Ivarr and his descendants in each region where they were active, makes for a lot of redundancies and repetitions that a reader may find tedious at times. Also tedious are the sometimes overlong list of raids, fights and battles that are mentioned one after the other in long lists and sometimes hardly commented upon because little else is known about them than their name and the fact that these events happened.

Finally, the author's tendency to reject almost systemically all non-contemporary sources as "legendary" and therefore untrustworthy (the 12th and 13th sagas in particular) severely limits the source material that can be used, even if archaeology may help to some extent. One consequence, to some extent, is that the author is obliged to speculate and assume a lot.

To sum up, the topic covered and the contents of this book are fascinating and of high quality, as least as far as I know. However, getting to grips with it is a bit of a challenge. This is a pity because, from a general reader's perspective, the book's rating suffers from its relative lack of accessibility (four stars).