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by Michael Grant,Marcus Tullius Cicero
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Humanities
  • Author:
    Michael Grant,Marcus Tullius Cicero
  • ISBN:
    0140442448
  • ISBN13:
    978-0140442441
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Penguin Classics; 1st Edition edition (September 30, 1971)
  • Pages:
    384 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
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    1387 kb
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    1517 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    849
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This is an anthology of Cicero's prose writings by the late historian Michael Grant. I have read this book at least a dozen times

This is an anthology of Cicero's prose writings by the late historian Michael Grant. I have read this book at least a dozen times. Just the introduction (about 40 pages) is worth the price of the book.

By Marcus Tullius Cicero Introduction by Michael Grant Translated by Michael Grant. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. Category: Philosophy Nonfiction Classics Literary Collections. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators. Sep 30, 1971 384 Pages. Also by Marcus Tullius Cicero. See all books by Marcus Tullius Cicero. About Marcus Tullius Cicero.

On all levels, Marcus Tullius Cicero lived a memorable life. The introduction by Michael Grant (about 50 pages) is worth the price of this book. He was the best-known barrister and the most respected orator in republican Rome, a society where law and oratory were central to public life.

Author(s): Marcus Tullius Cicero, Michael Grant (Translator). Published July 5th 2012 by Penguin Books. On the Good Life (ebook). Published September 30th 1971 by Penguin Group (USA). Penguin Classics, Paperback, 240 pages. Author(s): Marcus Tullius Cicero, Michael Grant. ISBN: 1101488131 (ISBN13: 9781101488133).

Cicero, Marcus Tullius Cicero. Cicero, Marcus Tullius Cicero. For the great Roman orator and statesman Cicero, 'the good life' was at once a life of contentment and one of moral virtue - and the two were inescapably intertwined. Перевод: Grant Michael. Издание: иллюстрированное, перепечатанное.

Publisher: Penguin Books. Author: Marcus Tullius Cicero. Street Date: September 30, 1971.

Imprint: Penguin Classics An accomplished poet, philosopher, rhetorician, and humorist, Marcus Tullius Cicero (106 BC- 43 BC) was also the greatest forensic orator Rome ever.

Imprint: Penguin Classics. Published: 22/11/1979. An accomplished poet, philosopher, rhetorician, and humorist, Marcus Tullius Cicero (106 BC- 43 BC) was also the greatest forensic orator Rome ever produced. To Cicero, service to the res publica (literally, "the public affair") was a Roman citizen's highest duty.

By Marcus Tullius Cicero. Many people, including Art Garfunkel, keep such records. Besides, I’d read all the books years ago-not twenty years ago, granted, but six, seven, or eight-long enough for memory to do its destructive, distorting work, to the point where the three wholly read books were about as hazy to me as the mostly unread one.

Title: On the Good Life Author: Cicero, Marcus Tullius/ Grant, Michael (TRN) Publisher: Penguin Group USA Publication Date: 1971/06/01 Number of Pages: 382 Binding Type: PAPERBACK Library of Congress: 77030399 O. .

Title: On the Good Life Author: Cicero, Marcus Tullius/ Grant, Michael (TRN) Publisher: Penguin Group USA Publication Date: 1971/06/01 Number of Pages: 382 Binding Type: PAPERBACK Library of Congress: 77030399 On the Good Life (Penguin Classics). To ensure we are able to help you as best we can, please include your reference number: AT8A4F0EI9.

For the great Roman orator and statesman Cicero, 'the good life' was at once a life of contentment and one of moral virtue - and the two were inescapably intertwined. This volume brings together a wide range of his reflections upon the importance of moral integrity in the search for happiness. In essays that are articulate, meditative and inspirational, Cicero presents his views upon the significance of friendship and duty to state and family, and outlines a clear system of practical ethics that is at once simple and universal. These works offer a timeless reflection upon the human condition, and a fascinating insight into the mind of one of the greatest thinkers of Ancient Rome.For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

Conjukus
I found this book to be a great introduction to Cicero's works. This work does not contain any of his famous speeches but rather a few of the essays he composed while in exile in Tusculum. Thus though it is a good introduction to his works, it is certainly not representative of them.

Cicero is often called Rome's greatest orator and sometimes even the greatest thinker in the Roman Republic. Certainly, whatever the merits of these appellations, Cicero certainly was one of the greatest thinkers anywhere in the Classical world. The clarity and thoughtfulness of his writings and speeches are superceded only by their timelessness.

This anthology explores Cicero's ideas relating to how one should live one's life in order to be happy. The general conclusion is that one should live a moral and balanced life, and that in so doing, one will find happiness. These ideas are then fleshed out regarding friendships, duties to others, and the like. The material is usually thought-provoking and well put together, and the translation is solid.

In the end, I was struck by the degree to which Cicero managed to synthesize realism and idealism into a whole which was not only practical and empirically sound but also based on the noblest of ideals. His works are thus both challenging and rewarding for people of any viewpoint on life.
Andromakus
What can you say? There is great wisdom here for the modern man.
Xanna
One thing to note about this book is that it is a collection of selected chapters from Cicero's works. The only work that is complete is "On Friendship". More than likely, this was designed for literature classes that needed a sampling of Cicero without getting too deep into his writings. If you're a first time reader who would like a sample of Cicero to see if you would like to read more of his works, then this would be a good collection to get you started. However, if you would like complete works, you should avoid this book.
betelgeuze
This is the single best introduction to Cicero. This is an anthology of Cicero's prose writings by the late historian Michael Grant. I have read this book at least a dozen times. Just the introduction (about 40 pages) is worth the price of the book.
Grosho
This is an exceptional work by an outstanding Roman civic leader of talent and dedication. I was first acquainted with Cicero through his Cataline Orations which I read in Latin in High School.
Yes, we have been debased since the 60's. Our society is no longer acquainted with this original thinker and orator. Cicero was not a media darling; he was not a mere rhetorician. He faced serious issues in the arena of give and take and his logic and reasoning is superb. He did not rely on "talking heads" and polls. He had strength of will and a sense of public virtue and he was dedicated to the good of his country and was willing to sacrifice himself in defending that good.
But, beyond that, he adhered to the Stoic philosophy, originating in Classical Greece. This book, very readible, from "ancient" Rome, provides Cicero's personal philosophical belief to the way of personal virtue for a citizen. This book has significant value for one seeking answers to personal approaches to our modern American world of adulation of media, Hollywood,"Super Models", political, and seclarist royalty to the neglect of country.
The time to revisit Cicero' philosphical works, and the works of other stoics, is at hand.
Early Waffle
Very satisfied.
CONVERSE
In Cicero's view, happiness was a by-product of a life led virtuously (or the 'good life' of the title). If the essays in On Government (Penguin Classics) emphasises the 'how' of public life, this collection of essays, Cicero articulates the 'why'. In this collection, Cicero indulges in his favourite narrative device (an imagined conversation in which the key protagonist gets most of - and usually the best - lines) a bit too much for my liking. This particularly applies to the long essay "The Orator", which while containing some interesting food for thought and reflection almost appears to belong in "On Government". Overall, of considerable interest, especially the essays "On Duties" and "On Friendship", and I am sure it will bear a few re-reads and continue to be enlightening in the future.
What strikes me as kind of funny is that I would like to frame this review as "take a step back from the current political chaos, and listen to a voice of wisdom from long ago." I still think this is a great idea, but have to admit that Cicero managed to produce the bulk of his writing just at the time when he was in the midst of enormous political chaos --- and family tragedy.

Somehow, he managed to turn out a whole bunch of fascinating writing, particularly dealing with the question, "Is moral goodness enough to give us a happy life?" This, I think, is a deceptively simple question, and it brings to mind all sorts of scenarios: going into the slave trade to make your millions, and then retiring to have nightmares for the rest of your life, or perhaps: what should you do when you find your parents have died and all of your siblings have turned into Greed Machines and are ready to fight on for years in the courts over every last stamp in Dad's stamp collection? I know at least one couple who simply withdrew from the Greedfest, and I suspect that they were much happier than their relatives.

Finally, I think a good acquaintance with Cicero is a magnificent thing for an American citizen. I must say, I find it absolutely impossible to even imagine Pelosi and Reid reading this book; they are quoted as being completely busy "wining and dining" their big donors in Pacific Heights. But perhaps this is one place where Joe Citizen can steal a march on them! :-)

Good stuff here!