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by Anthony J. Mireless
Download Fatal Army Air Forces Aviation Accidents in the United States, 1941-1945, Vol. 1: Introduction, January 1941-June 1943 fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    Anthony J. Mireless
  • ISBN:
    0786427884
  • ISBN13:
    978-0786427888
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers (May 9, 2006)
  • Pages:
    436 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
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This work chronicles the 6,350 known fatal AAF aircraft accidents that occurred in the continental United States from January 1941 through December 1945.

This work chronicles the 6,350 known fatal AAF aircraft accidents that occurred in the continental United States from January 1941 through December 1945. Each crash summary, based on official records, provides details such as crash location and cause, the people involved and the type and number of aircraft.

The Army Air Forces lost more than 4,500 aircraft in combat against . This work chronicles the 6,350 known fatal AAF aircraft accidents that occurred in the continental United States from January 1941 through December 1945.

The Army Air Forces lost more than 4,500 aircraft in combat against Japanese army and naval air forces in WWII. During the same time, the AAF lost more than 7,100 aircraft, and 15,530 personnel, in the United States to accidents in training and transportation.

States, 1941-1945, Vol. 1: Introduction, January 1941-June 1943.

By Anthony J. Mireless. Fatal Army Air Forces Aviation Accidents in the United States, 1941-19. Fatal Army Air Forces Aviation Accidents in the United States, 1941-1945, Vol. May 9, 2006, McFarland & Company, In. Publishers. Paperback in English.

The tragic accident in 1943 involving the CG-4 Glider which crashed during a demonstration flight due to structural . That was because they grew up in an air force where pilots and aircraft were expendable and accidents were the "cost" of the dangerous business of flying.

The tragic accident in 1943 involving the CG-4 Glider which crashed during a demonstration flight due to structural failure. Among those killed was the Mayor of St Louis, MO, his city comptroller, the local Chamber of Commerce President as well as the two man crew and the officer in charge of the Army's Glider Procurement Program. One thing this book does not do is that it does not give you Lat/Long locations for these crash sites. It does not provide a current status of the crash site.

Historian Anthony J. Mireles chronicles over 6,350 Army Air Forces. Mount Strong, Bubo Valley, New Guinea. At an unknown time, a North American B-25C (41-12485) collided with rising terrain while flying in instrument conditions in the Bubo Valley, New Guinea, killing the crew of six. The airplane took off from Seven-Mile Airdrome, Port Moresby, Papua, New Guinea, on a reconnaissance mission to Buna, New Guinea and Gona, New Guinea.

Despair not: additional books covering USAAF accidents in the Pacific . Fatal Army Air Forces Aviation Accidents in the United States, 1941–1945

Even if you did nothing else than read the Introduction in Volume 1 you’d gain an appreciation for World War II aviation issues you may have never considered before. Fatal Army Air Forces Aviation Accidents in the United States, 1941–1945. by Anthony J. Mireles. McFarland & Company (May 9, 2006).

Narrative: On 1 January 1943 Air Cadet Robert Charles Swope, an USAAF student pilot, took off from Jackson air . 20-year old Swope was killed in the crash. He had enlisted in the Army Air Corps in June 1942 and held at the time a civilian pilot license

Narrative: On 1 January 1943 Air Cadet Robert Charles Swope, an USAAF student pilot, took off from Jackson air field, Tennessee, base of the 68th Flying Training Detachment, 29th Flying Training Wing, USAAF, for an authorized spin practic flight aboard the PT-19A 42-33878. At 0930 hrs he was unable to recover from an intentional spin entered at an altitude of 3,500 feet adn crashed into the ground eight miles northwest of Jackson. He had enlisted in the Army Air Corps in June 1942 and held at the time a civilian pilot license. He was born on 21 September 1922 in Huntingdon.

There were 18 fatal AAF accidents on 23 September 1943, the most accidents in one day.

There are at least 77 Army Air Forces airplanes and 331 AAF airmen and one female WASP pilot missing in the continental United States and its waters from the WWII years. There were 231 fatal AAF accidents during the month of January 1944. During August 1943, 598 people were killed in AAF airplane crashes, making it the most deadly month of the war. There were 18 fatal AAF accidents on 23 September 1943, the most accidents in one day. The deadliest single day was 24 January 1943 when 51 people were killed in AAF aircraft accidents. 1941: 234 fatal AAF accidents. 1942: 1110 fatal AAF accidents.

On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book

1 : Introduction, January 1941-June 1943 v. 2 : July 1943-July 1944 v. 3 : August 1944-December 1945, appendices, indexes. Corporate Name: United States. Army Air Forces History. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

Formatted Contents Note: v. 1 : Introduction, January 1941-June 1943 v. Rubrics: Aircraft accidents United States History 20th century. Download now Fatal Army Air Forces aviation accidents in the United States, 1941-1945 Anthony J. Download PDF book format. Download DOC book format.

During World War II, the air over the continental United States was a virtual third front. The little-known statistics are alarming: the Army Air Forces lost more than 4,500 aircraft in combat against Japanese army and naval air forces in the war. During the same time, the AAF lost more than 7,100 aircraft in the United States to accidents in training and transportation. Such accidents claimed the lives of more than 15,530 pilots, crewmembers and ground personnel, and the stories of their deaths are largely forgotten. This work chronicles the 6,350 known fatal AAF aircraft accidents that occurred in the continental United States from January 1941 through December 1945. Each crash summary, based on official records, provides details such as crash location and cause, the people involved and the type and number of aircraft. An aircraft serial number index, a record of AAF aircraft still listed as missing, crash statistics and a directory of AAF stations in the United States are included. This book is published as a set of three volumes. Replacement volumes can be obtained individually under ISBN 0-7864-2788-4 (for Volume 1), ISBN 0-7864-2789-2 (for Volume 2) and ISBN 0-7864-2790-6 (for Volume 3).