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Download They Called It Madness: The Canton Asylum for Insane Indians 1899-1934 fb2

by Todd E. Leahy
Download They Called It Madness: The Canton Asylum for Insane Indians 1899-1934 fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    Todd E. Leahy
  • ISBN:
    1615464182
  • ISBN13:
    978-1615464180
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    America Star Books (June 15, 2009)
  • Pages:
    272 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1224 kb
  • ePUB format
    1287 kb
  • DJVU format
    1882 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    356
  • Formats:
    mbr mobi docx azw


They Called It Madness book.

They Called It Madness book. They Called It Madness: The Canton Asylum for Insane Indians 1899-1934. In 1899, the United States federal government began the process that would end in the construction of a mental institution designed specifically for America’s Indian population. The Canton, or Hiawatha, Asylum opened its doors, and from across the nation, Indian people were sent to live out their days on the South Dakota Plains.

The Canton, or Hiawatha, Asylum opened its doors, and from across the nation, Indian people were sent to live out their days on the South Dakota Plains

book by Todd E. Leahy. When it closed in 1934, the asylum had served over three hundred patients.

I found so much more information about asylums and medical treatments from that era than I could include in my book. This blog covers information about asylums and the medical treatment of insanity from the 1800s until around 1934, when the Canton Asylum shut down.

The Canton Indian Insane Asylum, aka Hiawatha Insane Asylum, was a federal facility for Native Americans located in Canton, South Dakota, between 1898 and 1934. In 1898, Congress passed a bill creating the only 'Institution for Insane Indians' in the United States. The Canton Indian Insane Asylum (sometimes called Hiawatha Insane Asylum) opened for the reception of patients in January 1903. The first administrator was Oscar S. Gifford.

They Called It Madness: The Canton Asylum for Insane Indians, 1899-1934. Power and Powerlessness: The People of the Canton Asylum for Insane Indians. Baltimore: Publish America. Federal Indian policy, psychiatric care, assimilation and the Hiawatha Asylum for Insane Indians. Ann Arbor, MI. ProQuest 2016. ↑ Lincoln County: Hiawatha Insane Asylum. Vanished In Hiawatha:The Story of the Canton Asylum for Insane Indians. com/~sdlincol/hiawatha.

The Canton insane asylum in South Dakota is the only American institution created for a specific group: Native Americans. Carla Joinson has done an excellent job showing how this asylum came about and how it operated within the context of the early 20th century society. The author explains why an insane asylum just for American Indians was built, and how it remained open for over 20 years despite constant complaints and negative reports by inspectors. The author was fair, though, explaining how insanity was viewed and treated so long ago and why certain actions were tolerated.

The Canton, or Hiawatha, Asylum opened its doors, and from across the nation, Indian people were sent to live out their days on the South Dakota Plains. However, once an inmate was admitted to Canton, there was no way out other than death. Over one hundred inmates died behind the asylum walls. This previously unknown part of American history is told for the first time here.

The Canton Asylum for Insane Indians 1899-1934. A Little Black Dress Called MadnessBy: Thom YoungRs. 511 Madness & Love in Maida ValeBy: Todd SwiftRs. 789 14% Historical Dictionary of Native American MovementsBy: Todd LeahyRs.

In 1899, the United States federal government began the process that would end in the construction of a mental institution designed specifically for America's Indian population. The Canton, or Hiawatha, Asylum opened its doors, and from across the nation, Indian people were sent to live out their days on the South Dakota Plains. When it closed in 1934, the asylum had served over three hundred patients. However, once an inmate was admitted to Canton, there was no way out other than death. Over one hundred inmates died behind the asylum walls. This previously unknown part of American history is told for the first time here.

Marg
I was disappointed in this book. I guess I was looking for new information, but found very little. Good transaction, though, and good company to work with when buying books.
Nikok
I like the book at times it was difficult to read due to the intensity of the words. No pictures. It needed more research which it was difficult because they didn't keep decent records and focus a lot of writing on the doctor who was a glory hound and not so much on the patients who suffered because of him and the government.
Also I wanted three more of these books to inform others of the institution but there was a lack of availability and I was relieved because the book really wasn't all that for that price.
Ranicengi
great book - excellent transaction
Zodama
Great product shipped fast