» » The Loser (Helen & Kurt Wolff Book)

Download The Loser (Helen & Kurt Wolff Book) fb2

by George Konrád,Ivan Sanders
Download The Loser (Helen & Kurt Wolff Book) fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    George Konrád,Ivan Sanders
  • ISBN:
    015653584X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0156535847
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Mariner Books; First edition (October 5, 1982)
  • Pages:
    320 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1652 kb
  • ePUB format
    1708 kb
  • DJVU format
    1292 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    703
  • Formats:
    lrf txt doc lrf


Series: Helen & Kurt Wolff Book.

Series: Helen & Kurt Wolff Book. Paperback: 320 pages. Later, the collapse of bourgeoisie democracy at the machinations of the communists receives a well-described treatment; without some prior knowledge of who some of those only identified by initials here might be in real-life postwar Hungary, however, the effectiveness of this section weakens for Western readers.

A Helen and Kurt Wolff book. Translation of: Cinkos. The original books is too bright. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

In this novel by the author of the acclaimed Case Worker, a Hungarian intellectual reflects on his life before and after his country's bitter transformation to a Communist state

In this novel by the author of the acclaimed Case Worker, a Hungarian intellectual reflects on his life before and after his country's bitter transformation to a Communist state. Now, at 55, a failed son, brother, husband, lover, and revolutionary, he finds himself behind the wall of an insane asylum, feeling curiously protected from the world on the other side. A Helen and Kurt Wolff Book". Users who liked this book, also liked.

Поиск книг BookFi BookSee - Download books for free. Stanislaw Lem. 486 Kb. Eden (Helen & Kurt Wolff Book). 389 Kb.

George Konrád was a Hungarian novelist and essayist. Konrád was born in Berettyóújfalu, near Debrecen into an affluent Jewish family

George Konrád was a Hungarian novelist and essayist. Konrád was born in Berettyóújfalu, near Debrecen into an affluent Jewish family. He graduated in 1951 from the Madách Secondary School in Budapest, entered the Lenin Institute and eventually studied literature, sociology and psychology at Eötvös Loránd University. In 1956 he participated in the Hungarian Uprising against the aka György Konrád. George Konrád was a Hungarian novelist and essayist.

The Helen and Kurt Wolff Translator's Prize is an annual literary prize "honoring an outstanding literary translation from German into English" published in the USA the previous year. The prize was established in 1996, and is funded by the German government. It had been administered by the Goethe-Institut, Chicago until 2014.

Are you sure you want to remove The Loser (Helen & Kurt Wolff Book) from your list? . Published October 5, 1982 by Harvest Books. There's no description for this book yet.

Are you sure you want to remove The Loser (Helen & Kurt Wolff Book) from your list? The Loser (Helen & Kurt Wolff Book).

NYRB at the 2019 Brooklyn Book Festival September 12, 2019. Transit' Movie in . and Ireland July 11, 2019. Stalingrad' in the Press June 19, 2019.

In this novel by the author of the acclaimed Case Worker, a Hungarian intellectual reflects on his life before and after his country's bitter transformation to a Communist state. Now, at 55, a failed son, brother, husband, lover, and revolutionary, he finds himself behind the wall of an insane asylum, feeling curiously protected from the world on the other side. A Helen and Kurt Wolff Book

Walianirv
This novel spans forty or fifty years of an half-Jewish Hungarian from a provincial town who participates in many of the expected events from the mid-20c. You see through this densely described but thinly plotted series of vignettes life as a small boy regaling you with peasant and small-town stories before the onset of WW2 brings that relative idyll to a close. In one of the strongest sections, the fury of civil war that brings the Nazis, the Soviets, partisans, and communist activists like the narrator into a tremendously violent clash. Like the hero of the book and film "Europa, Europa," the speaker here also must keep switching allegiances as the borders constantly shift and Hungary's caught between the warring powers.
Later, the collapse of bourgeoisie democracy at the machinations of the communists receives a well-described treatment; without some prior knowledge of who some of those only identified by initials here might be in real-life postwar Hungary, however, the effectiveness of this section weakens for Western readers. (Some note or appendix by the translator would've helped.)
The travails of the narrator in prison also become gripping as the Party seeks to tighten its grip on even and especially its own members, in the name of permanent vigilance and the necessity to continually finds scapegoats for the "people" to blame. The 1956 revolt receives a mixed review here, surprising to many weaned on more of a heroic, James Michener rendering.
More prison, more mental hospital (the monologue of the sanitarium director to the narrator on his hospital discharge is priceless), and more pages devoted to the plight of the somewhat pampered intellectual in the service of being a predictable dissident to the West and privileged servant of the East: these concerns take up much of the remainder of the story, along with a substantial amount of spontaneous and/or furtive sex, which seems pro forma for these types of novels (see Klima and Kundera for comparison). The problem, as with Konrad's later "A Feast in the Garden," is that little of the writer's energy seems directed towards creating art rather than commentary. Perhaps the changed circumstances within which Konrad would've labored as a writer under the communist regime to produce this work pertain, but for Western readers, it's not a gripping storyline. You'd benefit from it more for what it conjures up about life under attempted and actual totalitarianism than for a fluid and inventive array of characters, settings, or symbols.
A final note: A mincos (the Hungarian title) means more a "go-between" or a "panderer" rather than "loser." The distinction clarifies the situation often found by a narrator who winds up neither Jew nor Gentile, Communist nor anti-Communist, freed from confinement nor imprisoned behind walls. The prose never really lifts its unrelenting miasmatic tone, but the insights, self-loathing, and panoramic scenes make it an appropriate account of its time and place.
Globus
I took an eastern european literature class and that's how I was introduced to this work, and I think it's one of the best books ever written. The only tough to deal with section is the beginning where he's in the asylum and in stream of consciousness mode for twenty pages or so but hanging in there is well worth it. I don't know what this other fellow means by this book wouldn't appeal to western readers. It's 1984, one who flew over the cuckoo's nest, all quiet on the western front and jim thompson noir all rolled into one; what's not to like with that toothsome mix. I wish I could give a more indepth review but I read the book 15 years ago; when I get the time I will read it again. I had to write a review because this great book has only been reviewed by one other person. What a shame. More people need to know about this book.