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by Nancy .J. Nersessian
Download Faraday to Einstein: Constructing Meaning in Scientific Theories (Science and Philosophy) fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    Nancy .J. Nersessian
  • ISBN:
    0792309502
  • ISBN13:
    978-0792309505
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Kluwer Academic Publishers; Softcover reprint of the original 1st ed. 1984 edition (October 31, 1990)
  • Pages:
    198 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1344 kb
  • ePUB format
    1445 kb
  • DJVU format
    1614 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    268
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Science and Philosophy.

Science and Philosophy. Faraday to Einstein: Constructing Meaning in Scientific Theories. In moving straight from Maxwell to Lorentz and then on to Einstein, we are obviously passing over a long list of aether theorists of late-19th and early-20th century physics. I find this period intriguing to study in that some of the best mathematical and scientific minds that have ever lived devoted their entire lives to the construction of theories about an entity which, we would now say, did not exist.

Nancy J. Nersessian is the Regents' Professor and Professor of Cognitive Science at. . Nersessian is the Regents' Professor and Professor of Cognitive Science at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Her work tends to be in the areas of the philosophy of science, the history of science, and the psychology of science Works. Creating Scientific Concepts (MIT Press, 2008), ISBN 0-262-14105-1. Faraday to Einstein: Constructing Meaning in Scientific Theories'' (Kluwer, 1984, 1990), ISBN 90-247-2997-1. Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Springer Science & Business Media, 1984 M09 30 - 196 pages

Springer Science & Business Media, 1984 M09 30 - 196 pages. Einstein often expressed the sentiment that "the eternal mystery of the world is its comprehensibility," and that science is the means through which we comprehend it. However, nearly every one - including scientists - agrees that the concepts of modem physics are quite incomprehensible: They are both unintelligible to the educated lay-person and to the scientific community itself, where there is much dispute over the interpretation of even (and especially) the most basic concepts. Meaning in scientific practice. Bibliographic Information. Authors: Nersessian, Nancy. Science and Philosophy.

Similar books and articles. Did Einstein Really Believe That Principle Theories Are Explanatorily Powerless? Marc Lange - 2014 - Perspectives on Science 22 (4):449-463. Nancy J. Nersessian - 1985 - Philosophy of Science 52 (4):641-642. Faraday to Einstein: Constructing Meaning in Scientific Theories by Nancy J. Nersessian. Nersessian - 1987 - In The Process of Science: Contemporary Philosophical Approaches to Understanding Scientific Practice. Kluwer Academic Publishers. Faraday's Theories of Matter and Electricity.

Faraday to Einstein book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Faraday to Einstein book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Faraday to Einstein: Constructing Meaning in Scientific Theories as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Faraday to Einstein: Constructing meaning in scientific theories. Essays in the History and Philosophy of Science and Mathematics, 129-166, 2002. Springer Science & Business Media, 2012. The cognitive basis of model-based reasoning in science. The cognitive basis of science, 133-153, 2002. Conceptual change in science and in science education. Maxwell and the method of physical analogy : Model-based reasoning, generic abstraction, and conceptual change.

Philosophy of Science. Volume 52, Number 4 De. 1985.

Science and Philosophy, 1984. Download with Google. View publication stats. Download pdf. Close.

Faraday to Einstein : Constructing Meaning in Scientific Theories. by Nancy J.

Einstein often expressed the sentiment that "the eternal mystery of the world is its comprehensibility," and that science is the means through which we comprehend it. However, nearly every­ one - including scientists - agrees that the concepts of modem physics are quite incomprehensible: They are both unintelligible to the educated lay-person and to the scientific community itself, where there is much dispute over the interpretation of even (and especially) the most basic concepts. There is, of course, almost universal agreement that modem science quite adequately accounts for and predicts events, i. e. , that its calculations work better than those of classical physics; yet the concepts of science are supposed to be descriptive of 'the world' as well - they should enable us to comprehend it. So, it is asked, and needs tobe"asked: Has modem physics failed in an important respect? It failed with me as a physics student. I came to physics, as with most naIve students, out of a desire to know what the world is really like; in particular, to understand Einstein's conception of it. I thought I had grasped the concepts in classical mechanics, but with electrodynamics confusion set in and only increased with relativity and quantum mechanics. At that point I began even to doubt whether I had really understood the basic concepts of classical mechanics.