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by Joseph Jacobs
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Humanities
  • Author:
    Joseph Jacobs
  • ISBN:
    159462514X
  • ISBN13:
    978-1594625145
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Book Jungle (February 8, 2007)
  • Pages:
    300 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1540 kb
  • ePUB format
    1335 kb
  • DJVU format
    1533 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    494
  • Formats:
    azw docx lrf mobi


Joseph Jacobs (29 August 1854 – 30 January 1916) was an Australian folklorist, translator, literary critic, social scientist, historian and writer of English literature who became a notable collector and publisher of English folklore.

Joseph Jacobs (29 August 1854 – 30 January 1916) was an Australian folklorist, translator, literary critic, social scientist, historian and writer of English literature who became a notable collector and publisher of English folklore. Jacobs was born in Sydney to a Jewish family.

Put the Key in the Keyhole, which it fits exactly, unlock the door and walk in. To My Dear Little May Pref.

Joseph Jacobs helped popularize many fairy tales, including . Indian Fairy Tales, Joseph Jacobs’ first book of folklore from India, was published in 1910. Fairy tales by Joseph Jacobs.

Joseph Jacobs helped popularize many fairy tales, including Goldilocks and the Three Bears. He has collected tales from England, India, and the Celtic. He began collecting English fairy tales, with the first anthology English Fairy Tales, and in 1892, published Celtic Fairy Tales. Frontispiece in Joseph Jacobs’ More Celtic Fairy Tales, 1894.

LibriVox recording of English Fairy Tales, collected by Joseph Jacobs. A collection of traditional English fairy tales. description by Joy Chan). Download M4B (117MB).

Joseph Jacobs English Fairy Tales Preface Tales Tom Tit Tot The Three Sillies The Rose-Tree The Old Woman and Her Pig How Jack Went to Seek His . Joseph Jacobs English Fairy Tales. How to Get Into This Book

Joseph Jacobs English Fairy Tales Preface Tales Tom Tit Tot The Three Sillies The Rose-Tree The Old Woman and Her Pig How Jack Went to Seek His Fortune Mr. Vinegar Nix Nought Nothing Jack Hannaford Binnorie Mouse and Mouser Cap O’ Rushes Teeny-Tiny Jack and the Beanstalk The Story of the Three Little Pigs The Master and His Pupil Titty Mouse. How to Get Into This Book.

Start listening to Fairy Tales by Joseph Jacobs on your phone right now with Player FM's free mobile app, the best podcasting experience on both iPhone and Android.

Jacobs Joseph English Fairy Tales - читать книгу онлайн бесплатно. Надеемся, Вы провели время с удовольствием! Поделитесь, пожалуйста, своими впечатлениями

h Fairy Tales which English children will listen to, would have been unachieved. Tom Tit Tot. Once upon a time there was a woman, and she baked five pies.

h Fairy Tales which English children will listen to, would have been unachieved. This book is meant to be read aloud, and not merely taken in by the eye. In a few instances I have introduced or changed an incident.

142 Joseph Jacobs Preface ENGLISH WHO SAYS that English folk have . The words Fairy Tales must I heard them myself in my youth in Australia.

142 Joseph Jacobs Preface ENGLISH WHO SAYS that English folk have no fairy-tales of their own? FAIRY TALES The present volume contains only a selection out of some 140, of which I have found traces in this country. It is prob- able that many more exist. As couple of these stories have been found among descendants our book is intended for the little ones, we have indicated its of English immigrants in America; a couple of others I tell as contents by the name they use. One of the accordingly be taken to include tales in which occurs some- best was taken down from the mouth of an English Gipsy.

Anyway, this is a solid book of fairy tales (English ones, fancy that)

Anyway, this is a solid book of fairy tales (English ones, fancy that). Some of the stories are depressing or weird, but most of them are pretty typical fairy tales or folk tales (being either of princes and princesses or of really stupid peasants, respectively).

Who says that English folk have no fairy tales of their own?    The present volume contains only a selection out of some 140, of which I have found traces in this country. It is probable that many more exist.A quarter of the tales in this volume have been collected during the last ten years or so, and some of them have not been hitherto published. Up to 1870, it was said equally of France and of Italy, that they possessed no folk-tales. Yet, within fifteen years from that date, over looo tales had been collected in each country. I am hoping that the present volume may lead to equal activity in this country, and would earnestly beg any reader of this book who knows of similar tales, to communicate them, written down as they are told, to me, care of the Publishers. The only reason, I imagine, why such tales have not hitherto been brought to light, is the lamentable gap between the governing and recording classes and the dumb working classes of this country-dumb to others but eloquent among themselves.

Togar
First let me say that this book is by Joseph Jacobs, while John Batten is the illustrator--which is useless in the kindle version, since there are no illustrations at all. I'm not sure why the error exists, since the book itself has the correct author on the first page.

Anyway, this is a solid book of fairy tales (English ones, fancy that). Some of the stories are depressing or weird, but most of them are pretty typical fairy tales or folk tales (being either of princes and princesses or of really stupid peasants, respectively). I'd suggest reading through the book at least once before sharing it with children, because a few of the tales (like the one with the beautiful dead children) are probably ones you want to think hard about before subjecting your kids to them. Stories may also contain misogyny, bad role models, really stupid people, violence, and/or religious themes--but that's just how these sorts of fairy tales are, honestly.

I already mentioned that there are no illustrations, but the captions are still present and occasionally slightly confusing.

Contains the following stories:

The Pied Piper of Franchville
Hereafterthis
The Golden Ball
My Own Self
The Black Bull of Norroway
Yallery Brown
Three Feathers
Sir Gammer Vans
Tom Hickathrift
The Hedley Kow
Gobborn Seer
Lawkamercyme
Tattercoats
The Wee Bannock
Johnny Gloke
Coat O'Clay
The Three Cows
The Blinded Giant
Scrapefoot
The Pedlar of Swaffham
The Old Witch
The Three Wishes
The Buried Moon
A Son of Adam
The Children in the Wood
The Hobyahs
A Pottle O'Brains
The King of England and His Three Sons
King John and the Abbot of Canterbury
Rushen Coatie
The King O'the Cats
Tamlane
The Stars in the Sky
News!
Puddock, Mousie and Ratton
The Little Bull-Calf
The Wee, Wee Mannie
Habetrot and Scantlie Mab
Old Mother Wiggle-Waggle
Catskin
Stupid's Cries
The Lambton Worm
The Wise Men of Gotham (sadly, not about Batman)
The Princess of Canterbury
SARAND
These stories were written in a rough tone and have an unpolished feel to them. This is not necessarily a detraction, and some tales were better than other, but it was occasionally wearying to read them in the poor grammar of colloquial speech. Hence, four stars. Also, it lacks an interactive table of contents.

Tales included are;

Tom Tit Tot
The Three Sillies
The Rose-Tree
The Old Woman and Her Pig
How Jack Went to Seek His Fortune
Mr. Vinegar
Nix Nought Nothing
Jack Hannaford
Binnorie
Mouse and Mouser
Cap o'Rushes
Teeny-Tiny
Jack and the Beanstalk
The Story of the Three Little Pigs
The Master and His Pupil
Titty Mouse and Tatty Mouse
Jack and his Golden Snuff-Box
The Story of the Three Bears
Jack the Giant-Killer
Henny-Penny
Childe Rowland
Molly Whuppie
The Red Ettin
The Golden Arm
THe History of Tom Thumb
Mr. Fox
Lazy Jack
Johnny-Cake
Earl Mar's Daughter
Mr. Miacca
Whittington and his Cat
The Strange Visitor
The Laidly Worm of Spindleston Heugh
The Cat and the Mouse
The Fish and the Ring
The Magpie's Nest
Kate Crackernuts
The Cauld Lad of Hilton
The Ass, the Table and the Stick
Fairy Ointment
The Well of the World's End
Master of All Masters
The Three Heads of the Well
Jerinovir
In my review, I'm more comparing how this book meets my expectations based on what I have read from the more well known fairy tale compilers like the Grimm Brothers and Hans Christian Anderson. Some of these English fairy tales are very familiar, but they are not always quite how I know them.

The first impression I had was that this book is more varied in terms of 'fairy tales'. There are a lot of folk tales, and silly children's stories that don't have any moral or resolution really ("Master of all Masters springs to mind, as a short tale that seems to have the point of reciting silly words). There is also a fixation on the name Jack for a lot of these characters. I just thought that was interesting. I wonder if they are all the same person. There is also references to King Arthur and his court which I found very fascinating because some of these tales seem grounded in realistic detail. They mention Kings who reigned and real locations in England as having seen the events in the story. It makes the tales a little less fantastical, even when there are giants roaming the English countryside.

Probably the tale that most surprised me was the story of Dick Whittington which now I realize I confused with the French "Puss in Boots" fairy tale. Dick Whittington's story is much less magical, and more about being lucky enough to have a very industrious cat who likes to hunt mice. "Mr. Fox" kind of stood out to me for its implied romance, gruesomeness, and the confrontation by the heroine. There are not too many stories in this book that are the same ilk. And lastly a story that I was surprised to see included was "The Golden Arm" which I was always more familiar with as a ghost story. But now I know it is definitely a very old one.

With the more realistic settings, sometimes whimsical nature of a few tales, and the English slang that is used at times, this book of fairy tales is rather different from what I'm used to. I find it very interesting to read the original of familiar tales and see how things have changed. For instance "The Story of the Three Bears" is more familiar to readers as "Goldilocks and the Three Bears." In the original story there is no Goldilocks - rather the intruder is a very disagreeable old woman. This book is definitely worth a read, for something different than the usual stories and perhaps to find some new favorite fairy tales.