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by Olga Soffer,Jake Page,J. M. Adovasio
Download The Invisible Sex: Uncovering the True Roles of Women in Prehistory fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    Olga Soffer,Jake Page,J. M. Adovasio
  • ISBN:
    0061170917
  • ISBN13:
    978-0061170911
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Smithsonian (February 6, 2007)
  • Pages:
    320 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1762 kb
  • ePUB format
    1135 kb
  • DJVU format
    1873 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    739
  • Formats:
    mobi mbr docx azw


M. Adovasio (Author), Olga Soffer (Author), Jake Page (Author) & 0 more.

M. ISBN-13: 978-1598743906.

The Invisible Sex: Uncovering the True Roles of Women in Prehistory In this eye-opening book, a new story about women in prehistory emerges with provocative implications for our assumptions about gender.

The Invisible Sex: Uncovering the True Roles of Women in Prehistory. by J. M. Adovasio, Olga Soffer, and Jake Page. J. Adovasio and Olga Soffer are two of the world's leading experts on perishable artifacts such as basketry, cordage, and weaving. In this eye-opening book, a new story about women in prehistory emerges with provocative implications for our assumptions about gender today. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere.

The Invisible Sex book. Olga Soffer is an anthropologist, and Jake Page is a science writer. They have put together in "The Invisible Sex" a book that attempts to. (1) Bring the general reader up to date on the latest developments in archaeology or paleo-anthropology; (2) Uncover the True Roles of Women in Prehistory (as in the subtitle); and.

On July 20, we had the largest server crash in the last 2 years. Full recovery of all data can take up to 2 weeks! So we came to the decision at this time to double the download limits for all users until the problem is completely resolved. Thanks for your understanding! Progress: 9. 9% restored. Главная The Invisible Sex: Uncovering the True Roles of Women in Prehistory. The Invisible Sex: Uncovering the True. In The Invisible Sex, the authors present an exciting new look at prehistory, arguing that women invented all kinds of critical materials, including the clothing necessary for life in colder climates, the ropes used to make rafts that enabled long-distance travel by water, and nets used for communal hunting. Shaped by cartoons and museum dioramas, our vision of Paleolithic times tends to feature fur-clad male hunters fearlessly attacking mammoths while timid women hover fearfully behind a boulder.

Adovasio, J. M; Soffer, Olga; Page, Jake

Adovasio, J. M; Soffer, Olga; Page, Jake.

Olga Soffer is an anthropologist, and Jake Page is a science writer

Olga Soffer is an anthropologist, and Jake Page is a science writer. An Important Challenge to Many Assumptions About Our Origins. com User, June 6, 2007.

J In The Invisible Sex, the authors present an exciting new look at prehistory . Nonfiction Anthropology Feminism.

The invisible sex. Uncovering the True Roles of Women in Prehistory. Adovasio (The First Americans, 2002), Soffer (Anthropology/Univ. Adovasio ; Olga Soffer & Jake Page. of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana) and science writer Page (In the Hands of the Great Spirit, 2003, et. reject the traditional view that men hunted the mammoth and women were passive consumers.

Shaped by cartoons and museum dioramas, our vision of Paleolithic times tends to feature fur-clad male hunters fearlessly attacking mammoths while timid women hover fearfully behind a boulder. In fact, recent research has shown that this vision bears little relation to reality.

The field of archaeology has changed dramatically in the past two decades, as women have challenged their male colleagues' exclusive focus on hard artifacts such as spear points rather than tougher to find evidence of women's work. J. M. Adovasio and Olga Soffer are two of the world's leading experts on perishable artifacts such as basketry, cordage, and weaving. In The Invisible Sex, the authors present an exciting new look at prehistory, arguing that women invented all kinds of critical materials, including the clothing necessary for life in colder climates, the ropes used to make rafts that enabled long-distance travel by water, and nets used for communal hunting. Even more important, women played a central role in the development of language and social life—in short, in our becoming human. In this eye-opening book, a new story about women in prehistory emerges with provocative implications for our assumptions about gender today.


Gralsa
As an academic, I'm almost embarrassed to say this, but I wish the book were about 1/4 as long as it is. I understand and appreciate the need to include the evidence in detail, but I would have gleaned much more had the authors made their points more succinctly. Or maybe it would have helped if they had included a summary of their main points at the end -- or even the beginning -- of each chapter. Two of their main points are not new: (1) that human history has been written by men and therefore with a male bias, and (2) archaeology is less likely to uncover evidence of women's tools, because so many do not survive like instruments traditionally attributed to men's work. As a professor of the psychology of women, I anticipated learning something exciting and new. The authors are apparently excellent researchers and evaluators of hypotheses, but I was not as excited by the content as the title had led me to hope.
Samugor
The authors have assembled a lot of data for their quick survey of both primate evolution and the prehistory of our own primate species. In such a short book, they can do no more than pass lightly over their sources, but the book does contain a good bibliography for further research. Reading it left this reviewer with the unavoidable conclusion that our current social system of interlocking patriarchies is a historical aberration. For most of our species' evolution, we have lived not with patriarchy, nor with matriarchy, nor with gender "equality" -- though the authors use this rather abstract term -- but in a state that I'd term "gender parity." In the dangerous conditions of the Paleolithic and early Neolithic, when human populations were so small and existence was so fragile, the contribution of every member of a group, whether male or female, was too valuable to ignore or denigrate. The book's only real flaw is the prose style -- breezy, bubbly, and filled with bits of slang like "more bang for the buck."
Dellevar
Wonderful book and research.......... I'm a cultural anthropologist and often asked "where are the women?"
Lesesshe
A wonderful story giving us great insights into prehistory that includes women and gives the male dominated field a run for their money. Well written, although a little too cute sometimes, it brings a global perspective that sums up much of the new information about prehistory that has been accumulated over the past few decades as more and more archaeological digs reach the light of day. Especially wonderful is the review of the role of string and textiles in the evolution of human culture and society.
Pemand
Every decade or two a book comes out that attempts to define what the "women's role" was in prehistory, antiquity, even more recent well documented history. A lot of what comes out of the effort is another "just so" story that attempts to explain how we all got where we are. As these authors point out, every generation of anthropologists, sociologists, archaeologists, and others approaches the past with a different set of cultural baggage. As a result of this bias, the interpretation of the role of women through time takes on a different character too. Anyone who doesn't believe this should read some of the biographies of Lucrezia Borgia. Renaissance authors saw her as something of an incestuous, husband murdering monster. The Victorians saw her as a poor helpless pawn in the power struggles of her father and brothers as they dealt with the aristocratic families of renaissance Italy. More modern authors tend to see her as a power broker herself and as a thoroughly acculturated woman of her time and circumstance. Aren't we all?

The present authors do a very good job of keeping their own biases in check and of examining possible reasons for the absence of specifically female presence in the past. Their idea that it is because of the perishability of the material remains of their endeavors is probably true, but hardly "proof." No one has actually even proven who manufactured the lithic remains of prehistoric culture, so one might say that the male gender is absent from prehistory as well. Even when material does survive, it does not really say anything about gender roles, however archaeologists sometimes do. I once visited the archaeological site of Ban Po in China. The site is one of the earliest settlement sites in the country and is now a site open to tourism, which is how I came to see it. The site markers indicated that much had been determined from the excavation, including the fact that men and women lived in separate houses, this from what amounted to little more than a confusing set of post-holes.

The effort to bring in the !Kung and the San--everyone does--and the Hopi/Navaho lifeways as an illustration of customary men's and women's roles in society, certainly gives a clearer picture of what might have been the case in our distant ancestor's time. However, one must always remember that any possible way something can be done probably has been done at some time or other in human history. We are very inventive animals. Trying to say that men "did this" and women "did that" is probably overlooking the fact that they may have been doing different things in different localities. Much of what is done and by whom depends on who can and who has the time.

I think the author's best point is that the concepts of male/female and man/woman are entirely different; the former being an immutable biological fact, the second a social construct. One might think of this in terms of what males and females think of and expect of one another as opposed to what society expects of each. Another interesting facet of the roles of men and women in society is the effects of economics--by which I mean the broader notion of making a living, that is staying alive--on the expectations of both roles. The change in Amerindian women's role and status in their society when the tribe moved from a settled agricultural economy to a more nomadic and hunting based economy has been mentioned in other books on the development of prehistoric and early historic behaviors. These changes arose as a result of external pressures on indigenous people. This type of external effect is many times difficult to find in prehistoric data let alone interpret it when it is. The fact that the American Indian moved from "prehistoric" to "historic" almost instantaneously is one of the reasons that their behavioral changes have been recorded. It is this fact that allows some of the archaeological data to be more easily interpreted. Furthermore recent archaeology has verified some of the on the spot reports by European witnesses, particularly pertaining to the Amazon river basin societies.

The authors are good at bringing in as many points of view as are available--which can be many--and about the biases in the past interpretation of women's role. They discuss especially the notion of "man the hunter" and dissect the likelihood of this interpretation. I suspect that the "man the hunter" role would be far more reliable as a description of Neanderthal behavior. Certainly their skeletal remains exhibit some major and repeated bone breaks that suggest close encounters with large and dangerous animals, while, so far as I am aware, this type of injury is found much less often among the bones of modern humans. This suggests that caution was the best solution in dealing with these animals. And after all, when you consider it, it was our own species not the Neanderthal that survived to modern times.

A very interesting book.
Llallayue
This book is incredible. A good look at the timeline of our roots.
Qulcelat
lots of good information.
Very interesting perspective. Anyone interested in the subject matter will enjoy this book.