» » Rhetoric in Postmodern America: Conversations with Michael Calvin McGee

Download Rhetoric in Postmodern America: Conversations with Michael Calvin McGee fb2

by Carol Corbin
Download Rhetoric in Postmodern America: Conversations with Michael Calvin McGee fb2
Humanities
  • Author:
    Carol Corbin
  • ISBN:
    157230278X
  • ISBN13:
    978-1572302785
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    The Guilford Press; 1 edition (November 14, 1997)
  • Pages:
    198 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Humanities
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1269 kb
  • ePUB format
    1978 kb
  • DJVU format
    1771 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    410
  • Formats:
    lit rtf mbr txt


Rhetoric in Postmodern America book.

Rhetoric in Postmodern America book. The first book-length presentation of the influential work.

Michael Calvin McGee. Rhetoric in Postmodern America: Conversations with Michael Calvin McGee. New York: The Guilford Press, 1998. Michael Calvin McGee (October 21, 1943, Rockwood, Tennessee – October 27, 2002, Iowa City, Iowa) was an American rhetorical theorist, writer, and social critic.

Michael Calvin McGee (October 21, 1943, Rockwood, Tennessee – October 27, 2002, Iowa City, Iowa) was an.

Michael Calvin McGee (October 21, 1943, Rockwood, Tennessee – October 27, 2002, Iowa City, Iowa) was an American rhetorical theorist, writer, and social critic. YouTube Encyclopedic.

Rhetoric in Postmodern America: Conversations with Michael Calvin McGee. Macgee, Michael Calvin. A presentation of the work of Michael Calvin McGee. Michael Calvin McGee, Carol Corbin. This volume demonstrates the importance of rhetoric to understanding power and culture in the postmodern age. This book is largely based on . More).

McGee had many major contributions in the realm of rhetoric and in cultural .

McGee had many major contributions in the realm of rhetoric and in cultural studies. The most important of these is considered to be his second major work, The Ideograph.

Michael Calvin McGee (October 21, 1943, Rockwood, Tennessee – October 27, 2002, Iowa City, Iowa ) was an.

Michael Calvin McGee (October 21, 1943, Rockwood, Tennessee – October 27, 2002, Iowa City, Iowa ) was an American rhetorical theorist, writer, and social critic. The son of John Vester and Dorothy Eloise (Hicks) McGee, he spent his early years in Knoxville, Tennessee. He graduated with a . in Speech from Butler University, where he was a champion debater. In 1967 he graduated with a . in Rhetoric from Cornell University. In 1973 he married Lyda Eugenia Twitty.

Michael McGee is a very important and influential rhetorical scholar in the American tradition of speech communication. Provocative and iconoclastic, he was in large measure responsible for the re-articulation of rhetorical studies toward an ongoing engagement with both political theory and social praxis. Up until now, his contribution has been largely invisible to Canadian students of communication. He is an essayist and his work appears in journals and anthologies that are on the margins of the Canadian version of our field

Rhetoric in Postmodern America. Conversations with Michael Calvin McGee.

Rhetoric in Postmodern America. Published November 14, 1997 by The Guilford Press. I first met Michael C. McGee in the fall of 1976 in Madison, Wisconsin.

Corbin, C. Gerbner, . L. Gross, M. Morgan, and N. Signorielli. The mainstreaming of America: Violence profile. DuPre, A. Communicating About Health: Current Issues and Perspectives. Journal of Communication, 37 (1987): 10–29. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. Kalisch, P. and B. Kalisch.

The first book-length presentation of the influential work of Michael Calvin McGee, this volume demonstrates the importance of rhetoric to understanding power and culture in the postmodern age. The book is largely based on a series of seminars in which McGee draws on important figures spanning the history of rhetorical thought--from Plato and Aristotle to Marx, McLuhan, Althusser, and Baudrillard--to develop his ideas about orality and performance, the public, technology, and processes of political change. An introduction by John Louis Lucaites discusses McGee's pathbreaking role within the wider field of rhetoric, and a concluding essay on Spike Lee enacts the "performative criticism" McGee theorizes in previous chapters to construct a powerful argument about race in contemporary America.

Bumand
Michael Calvin McGee died last month after one of those maddeningly cruel lengthy illnesses that prematurely forced him out of the classroom he so dearly loved. "Rhetoric in Postmodern America: Conversations with Michael Calvin McGee" is a cherished reminder of McGee as a mentor to those of us who studied under him at the University of Iowa and elsewhere, and an introduction to his approach to the study of rhetoric for the rest of the world. The conversations themselves are based on a series of seminars in which McGee developed with complex web of ideas. Those who studied with McGee will quickly find themselves in familiar territory as they read these five conversations (for me it was the Todd Willey anecdote about why English Departments consider rhetoricians bastard stepchildren unworthy of entry into the ivory towers of academia):
The volume begins with what amounts to an introductory first chapter entitled "McGee Unplugged," written by John Louis Lucaites, who was the first American born student to complete his doctorate under McGee. Lucaites reminds us that stylistically, conversations were McGee's forum of choice and that the conversations included in this volume do not have to be read sequentially. You can just as easily get from Isocrates as an example of "phronimos" in Chapter 2 to the notion of collectivity in Chapter 5 as you can the importance of representation to rhetoric. From the materialist conception of rhetoric to the need to remodel liberalism, the topics McGee talks about dance in and around the pivotal relationship between rhetoric and social theory, which was on one level simply the conventional name given at Iowa to McGee's work.
Chapter 2, Formal Discursive Theories reconsiders the relationship between rhetoric and dialectic and then the notion of wisdom, for which Isocrates and not Plato is the Dead Greek of choice. This leads to representations as the key way of characterizing our study of human action.
Chapter 3, The Postmodern Condition follows the lead of Walter Ong and Marshall McLuhan in considering orality to be humanity's state of nature. Ironically technology has allowed us to return to a more oral view of the world and creates new problems for looking at a "text," which can no longer be considered a single, finite entity.
Chapter 4, American Liberalism is more about the Whig-Liberal tradition that harkens back to Edmund Burke than it does to contemporary left-wing politics. With the shift from the Aristotlean rhetoric of persuasion to the Burkean rhetoric of identification, McGee posits the goal of scholarly endeavor to be political effectiveness in general and remodeling liberalism in particular. Within this context McGee looks at property and capital (i.e., how to tell the difference between liberals and communists), and how morality creates the space between law and liberty that establishes a code of conduct. Multicultrualism raises the issue of heterogeneity in our society while McGee returns to a favorite topic when he talks about the dynamic between "male" sovereignty and "female" solidarity."
Chapter 5, The People reconsiders the key elements of McGee's first seminal QJS essay by contrasting the spectatorship created by a world dominated by television with the collectivity that television can create in crisis. This returns us to the intellectual problem of subjectivity and ontology, which is what gets McGee to his friends Jose Ortega y Gasset and Jurgen Habermas.
Chapter 6, Materialism is established as a coherent philosophical position that is a variant of realism, which historical materialism (a pivotal term) as coded human practice. The idea of objectivity merely reminds us that human discourse is both referential and subjective at the same time. McGee uses the term instantiation to help us tell how materialism is different from the word as used by Communists and Wall Street types. A materialist's morality takes a more political turn that the Christian morality that serves as an idealistic exemplar.
As an example of McGee's "performance criticism," the volume concludes with a previously unpublished work "Fragments of Winter: Racial Discontent in America, 1992," in which McGee finds an extension of Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech in Spike Lee's film, "Do the Right Thing." Without getting into the particulars of this compelling essay, I would point out that McGee considers Lee's film on a cultural par with Picasso's painting "Guernica."
After reading this book the comparison between McGee and Kenneth Burke is perhaps the most relevant (flashback: McGee escorting the elderly Burke, who was about half McGee's size, at an SCA convention), for the simple reason that their public arguments display the same astounding breadth and depth of sources. For McGee reading Burke alone provided a superficial understanding; the only appropriate alternative was to read everything Burke had read (a premise fated to stay the heart of many a graduate student). For this reason you will find McGee talking about everything from Louis Althusser's understanding of the relationship between aesthetics and power to Thomas Szasz's study of the myth of mental illness (and that is just the names "dropped" over the course of these five conversations and one essay).
It must be noted that both of the reviewer comments by colleagues of McGee on the back of this volume use the word "exasperating" to describe these conversation, the term being contrasted with "stimulating" and "intriguing" respectively. The explanation for such exasperation, dear friends, lies within the cognitive realm of the receiver. I would advance this brief example of exorcism by appropriating a political slogan McGee would have found unsettling in his younger days: in your heart, you know he's right.
Lawrance M. Bernabo, "The Scopes Myth: The Scopes Trial in Rhetorical Perspective," Disseration, University of Iowa, 1990, directed by Michael Calvin McGee.
tamada
McGhee is a well-known fascist self-promoter.
His academic friends are suspect because they are former students unaware of his fascist ideals.