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by Joseph A. Soares
Download The Power of Privilege: Yale and America's Elite Colleges fb2
Education
  • Author:
    Joseph A. Soares
  • ISBN:
    0804756384
  • ISBN13:
    978-0804756389
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Stanford University Press; 1 edition (March 28, 2007)
  • Pages:
    256 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Education
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1712 kb
  • ePUB format
    1221 kb
  • DJVU format
    1482 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    493
  • Formats:
    azw docx lrf mbr


Joseph Soares' "The Privilege of Power" chronicles Yale's changing admission policies from the 1920's to the present. From the very beginning, Yale has had more qualified applicants than it has spaces for new students.

Joseph Soares' "The Privilege of Power" chronicles Yale's changing admission policies from the 1920's to the present. As an institution, it has had to maintain its high standards while balancing competing demands from its faculty and alumni.

The Power of Privilege examines the nexus between social class and admissions at America's top colleges from the vantage point of. .Joseph A. Soares is Associate Professor of Sociology at Wake Forest University.

The Power of Privilege examines the nexus between social class and admissions at America's top colleges from the vantage point of Yale University, a key actor in the history of higher education. It is a documented history of the institutional gatekeepers, confident of the validity of socially biased measures of merit, seeking to select tomorrow's leadership class from among their economically privileged clientele. Acceptance in prestigious colleges still remains beyond the reach of most students except those from high-income professional families.

The Power of Privilege book. It is widely assumed that admission to elite . The Power of Privilege: Yale and America's Elite Colleges. universities is based solely on academic merit-the best and brightest are admitted to Harvard, Yale, and their peer institutions as determined by test scores and GPA, and not by lineage or family income. But does reality support those expectations?

The Power of Privilege examines the nexus between social class and admissions at America's top colleges . Reliable surveys tell us that most adults think of merit in school or college as academic accomplishments; we. Reliable surveys tell us that most adults think of merit in school or college as academic accomplishments; w.Over 14 million journal, magazine, and newspaper articles.

Supported by abundant archival evidence from Yale and elsewhere, Joseph Soares takes on the myth of increasing meritocracy in elite college admissions in the United States. opened ivy-covered doors to a more academically talented and diverse student body but also assured the continued selection of students from the highest economic stratum. Soares, a Rutgers alumnus who spent two decades at Harvard and Yale as both a graduate student and professor, provides a historical treatment of the emergence of highly selective private college admissions, as exemplified by Yale.

The Power of Privilege: Yale and America's Elite Colleges. March 28th 2007 by Stanford University Press (first 2007).

The Power of Privilege: Yale and America’s Elite Colleges. Stanford University Press, 2007. Michael Sauder, "The Power of Privilege: Yale and America’s Elite Colleges by Joseph A. Soares," American Journal of Sociology 113, no. 5 (March 2008): 1470-1472. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. Eviction and the Reproduction of Urban Poverty. On the Relation Between Sociology and Ethics. Racial Profiling and Use of Force in Police Stops: How Local Events Trigger Periods of Increased Discrimination.

It is widely assumed that admission to elite . universities is based solely on academic merit-the best and brightest are admitted to Harvard, Yale, and their peer institutions as determined by test scores and GPA, and not by lineage or family income

It is widely assumed that admission to elite U.S. universities is based solely on academic merit―the best and brightest are admitted to Harvard, Yale, and their peer institutions as determined by test scores and GPA, and not by lineage or family income. But does reality support those expectations? Or are admissions governed by a logic that rewards socioeconomic status while disguising it as personal merit?

The Power of Privilege examines the nexus between social class and admissions at America's top colleges from the vantage point of Yale University, a key actor in the history of higher education. It is a documented history of the institutional gatekeepers, confident of the validity of socially biased measures of merit, seeking to select tomorrow's leadership class from among their economically privileged clientele. Acceptance in prestigious colleges still remains beyond the reach of most students except those from high-income professional families. Ultimately, the author suggests reforms that would move America's top schools toward becoming genuine academic meritocracies.


Stonewing
It's definitely an entertaining read for people on the both sides of academia.
Zeleence
In recent years, fewer than ten percent of the applicants to Yale University are admitted. Amongst those rejected are applicants with perfect SAT's and stellar grades. These accomplishments are not necessarily determinative as to whether an applicant is admitted. Yale's stated goal is to choose the applicants who are most likely to become the nation's future leaders. This is a lofty proposition and for the most part, Yale has been very successful in achieving its goal.

Joseph Soares' "The Privilege of Power" chronicles Yale's changing admission policies from the 1920's to the present. From the very beginning, Yale has had more qualified applicants than it has spaces for new students. As an institution, it has had to maintain its high standards while balancing competing demands from its faculty and alumni. As much history as sociology, this well written book covers such important events as Yale's Jewish quota, the advent of needs blind admissions, the recruitment of minority students and the arrival of women on Yale's campus in the early 1970's.

Of special interest is Soares' description of the economic model which drives the admission's process. In order to remain financially healthy, Yale needs sixty percent of its admits to be able to pay the full tuition price. Although while Yale has a needs blind admission policy, it understands that high SAT scores are directly linked to high socioeconomic status. Yale has the ability to seek out the nation's future leaders because it knows it has a core constituency of elite parents that are willing to spend over $40,000 a year to send their children to a prestigious college.

"The Power of Privilege" is a must read for anyone interested in the history of Yale University. This book also provides invaluable insights into the economic drivers that shape the admission's policies of our nation's elite universities. Highly recommended.