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by Albert O. Hirschman
Download Shifting Involvements: Private Interest and Public Action - Twentieth-Anniversary Edition (Eliot Janeway Lectures on Historical Economics) fb2
Business & Finance
  • Author:
    Albert O. Hirschman
  • ISBN:
    0691092923
  • ISBN13:
    978-0691092928
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Princeton University Press; 20 edition (January 27, 2002)
  • Pages:
    168 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Business & Finance
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1746 kb
  • ePUB format
    1943 kb
  • DJVU format
    1651 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    262
  • Formats:
    doc lrf rtf lrf


Series: Eliot Janeway Lectures on Historical Economics. Paperback: 168 pages.

Series: Eliot Janeway Lectures on Historical Economics. The author's premise that the general public is given to mass swings from seeking private gain to seeking public benefit, both driven by disappointment, is interesting; but the argument is never quite proven. For starters, there is offered no empirical evidence that this occurs.

Shifting Involvements can be read over and over again, with each reading disclosing new subtleties, so cunning is its . This interesting essay contains a wealth of ideas.

Shifting Involvements can be read over and over again, with each reading disclosing new subtleties, so cunning is its construction and so original its standpoint. -Michael Banton, Times Literary Supplement. Mr. Hirschman, one of our most distinguished economists, is no ordinary writer. even his offhand ruminations have always been interesting. There is a surprising freshness in the treatment of such a well worn topic as the relation between public and private concerns. Intellectually stimulating. -David Berry, Times Higher Education Supplement. Literate, reflective, and sophisticated.

Albert O. Hirschman is a member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton.

Common terms and phrases. Albert O. He is the author of many books, including Exit, Voice, and Loyalty and The Strategy of Economic Development. Robert H. Frank is Godwin Smith Professor of Economics, Ethics, and Public Policy at Cornell University. He is the author of Luxury Fever (Princeton).

Shifting Involvements Private Interest and Public Action Eliot Janeway Lectures on Historical Econom.

Shifting Involvements book

Shifting Involvements book. Why does society oscillate between intense interest in public. Start by marking Shifting Involvements: Private Interest and Public Action as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. In this classic work, Albert O. Hirschman offers a stimulating social, political, and economic analysis dealing with how and why frustrations of private concerns lead to public involvement and public participation that eventually lead back to those private Why does society oscillate between intense interest in public issues and almost total concentration on private goals?

Shifting Involvements : Private Interest and Public Action. The author's premise that the general public is given to mass swings from seeking private gain to seeking public benefit, both driven by disappointment, is interesting; but the argument is never quite proven

Shifting Involvements : Private Interest and Public Action. by Albert O. Hirschman.

The Eliot Janeway Lectures on Historical Economics in Honor of Joseph Schumpeter, Princeton University, 1979. The Description for this book, Shifting Involvements: Private Interest and Public Action, will be forthcoming. Published by: Princeton University Press. I started to work on this essay in June 1978 and in Paris, where a spate of articles and even books marked the tenth anniversary of the demonstrations, student uprisings, strikes, and other public actions in which large masses of citizens in Western Europe, North and South America, and Japan had participated in 1968.

The description for this book, Shifting Involvements: Private Interest and Public Action, will be forthcoming. About the Author: Albert O.

by Albert O. Why does society oscillate between intense interest in public issues and almost total concentration on private goals? In this classic work, Albert O. Hirschman offers a stimulating social, political, and economic analysis dealing with how and why frustrations of private concerns lead to public involvement and public participation that eventually lead back to those private concerns.

Why does society oscillate between intense interest in public issues and almost total concentration on private goals? In this classic work, Albert O. Hirschman offers a stimulating social, political, and economic analysis dealing with how and why frustrations of private concerns lead to public involvement and public participation that eventually lead back to those private concerns. Emerging from this study is a wide range of insights, from a critique of conventional consumption theory to a new understanding of collective action and of universal suffrage.


Bundis
I am a Hirschman admirer. He is one of our country's best (and underrated) economists. I wish more people were reading him especially in Washington -- but perhaps it should be required reading for all future economists. Sadly, Hirschman died recently. His thinking to economic thought have been too long neglected.
Friert
The author's premise that the general public is given to mass swings from seeking private gain to seeking public benefit, both driven by disappointment, is interesting; but the argument is never quite proven. For starters, there is offered no empirical evidence that this occurs. (The only historical review given is in support of the narrower point that a growing level of wealth generates disappointment in various affected classes.) Secondly, the explanations for why such swings *might* happen, or be expected to happen, never quite explain why these swings would happen *en masse*.

Nevertheless, I recommend reading this book -- it briefly introduces a range of provoking ideas. These include: that potential for disappointment varies by type of good, that there are multiple responses to disappointment (including postponing response by ignoring problems or internalizing dissatisfaction), that consumers do not have perfect knowledge nor only a single set of preferences, that "comfort is the enemy of pleasure," that public involvement could disappoint for providing too much *or* too little opportunity for participation.

The book is more marketing/psychology than economics, but its arguments could help explain, for instance, our modern shift to disposible goods and possible methods for understanding voters by understanding second-order volitions. It gets you thinking, even if the primary argument of the book is less than convincing.