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by Tim van de Vall,David Greelish
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  • Author:
    Tim van de Vall,David Greelish
  • ISBN:
    0615538126
  • ISBN13:
    978-0615538129
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Classic Computing Press; 3rd edition (April 28, 2014)
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1204 kb
  • ePUB format
    1191 kb
  • DJVU format
    1175 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    709
  • Formats:
    lit docx doc azw


Classic Computing is like getting the history of computer history nostalgia, all in one book! All ten issues of the groundbreaking computer history zine (newsletter, magazine) Historically Brewed & Classic Computing in one professionally bound volume.

Classic Computing is like getting the history of computer history nostalgia, all in one book! All ten issues of the groundbreaking computer history zine (newsletter, magazine) Historically Brewed & Classic Computing in one professionally bound volume. It also includes the personal background story of David Greelish.

David Greelish is raising funds for Bring a great computer history zine back to a new audience! on Kickstarter! . I published my story, plus all nine issues of the computer history nostalgia zine "Historically Brewed" into a high quality book.

David Greelish is raising funds for Bring a great computer history zine back to a new audience! on Kickstarter! I want to publish the nine issues of the computer history nostalgia zine "Historically Brewed" into a high quality book. It's also since been updated to include the one and only issue of "Classic Computing.

Historically Brewed was published from 1993 to 1997. We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you.

The Complete Historically Brewed book. Published November 30th 2011 by Classic Computing Press. Historically Brewed was published from 1993 to 1997. It grew to a respectful 500+ subscription b Finally, all nine issues of the groundbreaking computer history zine (newsletter, magazine) Historically Brewed - in one professionally bound volume.

His book, Classic Computing: The Complete Historically Brewed contains all of his computer history zines, plus his personal story. He has written extensively about computer history, created and participated in numerous podcasts, plus conducted both audio and written interviews with notable people in the industry, like: Ed Roberts, John Sculley, Alan Kay and more. He has also presented at numerous vintage computing conventions. Find out more at Dave’s web site, Classic Computing, and follow him on Twitter.

Classic Computing: The Complete Historically Brewed. Format:Perfect Paperback. Select Format: Perfect Paperback. Release Date:April 2014. Publisher:Classic Computing Press.

This was essentially Historically Brewed issue ten. The book and magazine are both truly wonderful. Thanks for sharing your creative work with a new generation of fans. Phenomenal work and much, much appreciated. It grew to a respectful 500+ subscription base and was even sold at the Smithsonian, American Computer Museum in Bozeman, Montana and The Computer Museum in Boston, MA (now the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, CA). Nine issues were published, with a tenth never completed (having changed the name to Classic Computing).

David Greelish is known to many in the computing community as an evangelist of classic computing. As a result David generously offered to send me The Complete Historically Brewed for my own personal collection

David Greelish is known to many in the computing community as an evangelist of classic computing. The extent of his interest has garnered such projects as the Classic Computing blog, Retro Computing Roundtable podcast, Stan Viet’s History Of The Personal Computer podcast, and the Classic Computing Show podcast. As a result David generously offered to send me The Complete Historically Brewed for my own personal collection.

COM: You recently published your book The Complete Historically Brewed

COM: You recently published your book The Complete Historically Brewed. How did that project come about, and how has it been received? I published nine issues of Historically Brewed and then changed the name to Classic Computing, but I never got another issue out, so I always wanted to publish all of the issues into one volume. They were very good newsletters, zines and history doesn’t get old, no pun intended. So in early 2011, I became aware of Kickstarter and decided to launch a campaign to publish my book.

He has published all of his computer history zines along with his own story in the book, The Complete Historically Brewed.

David Greelish has studied computer history and collected old computers for over 20 years now. He is a computer historian, writer, podcaster and speaker. He was the founder of the original Historical Computer Society, publisher of the zine Historically Brewed and is currently the founder of the Atlanta Historical Computing Society. He has published all of his computer history zines along with his own story in the book, The Complete Historically Brewed. He is currently the director of the Vintage Computer Festival Southeast . being held the weekend of April 20-21 in the greater Atlanta area.

Classic Computing is like getting the history of computer history nostalgia, all in one book! All ten issues of the groundbreaking computer history zine (newsletter / magazine) Historically Brewed & Classic Computing in one professionally bound volume. It also includes the personal background story of David Greelish, Publisher and Editor (writer for many of the stories too). The entire run of issues are accurately reproduced in their original format. Also, now IN the book, is the never before released first (and last) issue of Classic Computing with original content (stories acquired and covers designed in 1997). This was essentially Historically Brewed issue ten. Historically Brewed was published from 1993 to 1997 and it grew into a small, but very respectful 500+ subscriber base. It was eventually sold at the American Computer Museum in Bozeman, MT, Computer Museum in Boston, MA (now the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, CA) and the Smithsonian Institution. Originally nine issues were published, with a tenth never completed (having changed the name to Classic Computing). Like history itself, the stories of the zines don't age, and the other content from readers and contributors of the time have become interesting time capsules themselves.

Foginn
The printing quality is very low (it's like draft). It's a pity, because some adverts are really interesting. That's the only bad aspect.
Mr.Twister
David Greelish is my younger brother, so obviously I'm not going to have any critical words to say here. Not that any are called for!

The publishing of this hardbound collection of his wonderful "Fanzine", "Historically Brewed", is just yet another chapter in his long lasting love affair with all things computer... as long as they are old! The older the better it seems! I'm constantly amazed that he carries a iPhone! maybe because his Apple Newton doesn't do 4G? :-)

Seriously, this magazine was fresh, entertaining, and informative when it first debuted. Now that we are nearing the 10th anniversary of that first issue, those just discovering it will find it just as fresh, as entertaining, and that much more informative as now most of what it contained is truly historical, and nostalgic to boot! In 1993, the computers discussed within were, to many people , just old... now they are vintage! The people discussed within were, like many of us, still young. Now, not so much! In the end, for me, reading thru this hardbound edition was a joy of recollection. I think anyone that has even the slightest interest in the beginnings of this thing we call "Personal Computing" and we now take for granted, will enjoy this book as well.

Really, read through this fine collection and then just wait for that first episode of "Antique Roadshow" when a Altair or Apple One appears! it could happen...
Moonshaper
If you like computer history, you will like this book. This book would also be educational for those into computers, but unaware of computer history. This book consists of reprints of a 1990's computer history fanzine with articles on various subjects by the author and many others, such as Larry Anderson and Kevin Stumpf. For anyone actually interested in computer history, the wide variety of articles make the book of interest. There are also book reviews, letters to the editor, and interviews. One of the interviews is with Ed Roberts, known for the Altair computer.

What I liked about the book was the something-for-everyone articles which covered topics such as various computer companies, the earliest home computers and kit computers, and collecting arcade machines and computers. The articles about early Apple Computer were particularly interesting. "The Computer That Cracked The Enigma" is an article that goes all the way back to WW2, and What other book has a picture of the front panel of an Altair? (Page 164) The article about Gary Kildall also makes "Historically Brewed" deserve respect.

Those interested in computer history or retrocomputing will find this book an interesting read with various tidbits of information and as entertainment. If you like to learn about the PDP-8, the Apple LISA, or Kaypro computers, then you will enjoy this book. This is the kind of leisure reading that is fun to relax and look through with a glass of ice tea and a couch.

One might venture to say that this kind of book is not for the mainstream computer user, because of popular attitudes towards technology. However, the discerning reader can not only make parallels between the past and present products being produced, but he can often utilize the past to make predictions about the future of computing. Computer history is a subject which is overlooked and under-rated.

David Greelish should be rewarded for his dedication to his passion for computer history and commitment to the retrocomputing community. He took 2 basically inactive podcasts, and found a way for these pioneering community members to have a platform convenient and viable enough to maintain their regular output for the listeners. He has been involved in the community over the years in podcasting and in writing, and has written interesting and well-written articles for other fanzines such as 300 baud. Check out that magazines' 3 issues as well. Look up the Retrobits Podcast, 1 Mhz Podcast, Retrocomputing Roundtable Podcast, and David's first old 3 episode podcast, "Classic Computing".

[...]
Burilar
A wonderful look back at the early days of the computer age. Those were the days when every tech company in the world was making computers. They were all incompatible with each other. All the operating systems were different. Word processor software was like religion. It was a wild time. Once I was in our R&D facility and was commenting about the "new" 3.5 inch 400K disk that the Macintosh used. One of the engineers started yelling that those disks were TOYS and "real" computers used 5.25 disks! And he wasn't kidding either! Those were the days! This is a great book and brings back some great memories.
RuTGamer
I was there. My kids weren't. Today, with the help of David's book, I can show my kids (and others) a glimpse of some landmarks in my own *personal* computing journey.

Sitting on a coffee table, THE COMPLETE HISTORICALLY BREWED is a beckoning cornucopia of pictures and articles. More accessible than a rummaging tour through my basement. Whenever I pick it up to browse again, it reminds me of how much fun I've had exploring, learning, and collaborating with others along the way. My kids are amused by the "old school" ads.

I backed David's Kickstarter project, and it turned out nicely! Now, through Amazon, you can buy a copy of David's book and begin scheduling your own tours through his printed treasure trove of personal computing history. Enjoy!
Dominator
I was a sponsor of this project on Kickstarter and I couldn't be happier. This labor of love helped me connect with my own personal golden age of computing. The style is authentic and enjoyable and the production quality is great.
Dodo
My husband was amongst the "kickstarters" for this project. And not only is the author a nice and entertaining person, but this book is a magical journey into the past, for those who knew this era and stumble into good memories pages after pages, like my husband.

For those interested in computing history and are too young to have memories, this will serve as a gateway to an era they would have loved. I'm in that second category.