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by John Calvin Batchelor
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  • Author:
    John Calvin Batchelor
  • ISBN:
    038527811X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0385278119
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Dial Press; 1st edition (1983)
  • Pages:
    401 pages
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1279 kb
  • ePUB format
    1644 kb
  • DJVU format
    1272 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    954
  • Formats:
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If Batchelor intended Birth of the People's Republic of Antarctica to be satire, then I consider it a work of genius. Birth was published in 1983.

If Batchelor intended Birth of the People's Republic of Antarctica to be satire, then I consider it a work of genius. But I don't think he intended it to be satire. I have no idea how long Batchelor spent writing it, but in 1982 the brief but apparently long in the imagination Falklands War took place, and Birth sort of took its legacy in hand, extrapolating a few stray ideas into a future crisis and how Fiddle came to represent it.

John Calvin Batchelor (born April 29, 1948) is an American author and host of The John Batchelor Show. Based at AM 770 WABC radio in New York for five years from early 2001 to September 2006, the show was syndicated nationally on the ABC radio network. On October 7, 2007, Batchelor returned to radio on WABC, and later to other large market stations on a weekly basis.

John Calvin Batchelor (Author). The title belies the text. The People's Republic of Antarctica itself is no more than a footnote- it more is the story of the life of Grim Fiddle, taking place mostly on the Atlantic Ocean in various places. I enjoyed the descriptions of life on the waves, for I enjoy the waters of the deep. But I picked up the text hoping to hear about a Republic in Antarctica, as there is so little future history or imaginations that continent.

1983) A novel by John Calvin Batchelor. Awards John W Campbell Memorial Award Best Novel (nominee). In this book the author has written a stunning lament about the beastliness in man and the violence in nature, about the darkness of hope abandoned and the blood-price of hope regained. The power of his novel is its informed irony for what has been, and its measured fury for what may yet be. It is bewitching work of profound and prophetic vision. Genre: Literary Fiction. Similar books by other authors.

In overall design, the book does have grace

In overall design, the book does have grace. Batchelor, employing a character named Charity Bentham, a Nobel Prize winner, pegs much of this barbarity on the steady rise of a new utilitarianism: pleasures taken, pains discounted, charities hypocritical. But the republic of the title, headed by Grim, is a deplorably murky affair-because Batchelor has by this time so wrapped himself in the resonances of political essay and Norse mythological parallel that he's unable to deliver anything like a clear, vivid narrative.

Bibliographic Details  .

Bibliographic Details Publisher: New York: The Dial Press, Binding: Hardcover. Please be assured: All of our packages are padded thoroughly and packed with care! Note: Foreign customers, please indicate a shipping preference where possible-charges will reflect the method chosen.

Henry Holt & Co. Book Format. John Calvin Batchelor.

The Birth of the People's Republic of Antarctica: A Novel Format: Paperback Authors: John Calvin Batchelor ISBN10: 0805037861 Published: 1995-04-01 The Birth of the People's Republic of Antarctica: A Novel. Henry Holt & Co.

by John Calvin Batchelor. Select Format: Hardcover. ISBN13:9780140071511.

Dive deep into John Calvin Batchelor's The Birth of the People's Republic of. .com will help you with any book or any question.

In Batchelor’s novel, the decline of twentieth century pluralistic states and other institutions creates a class of seaborne exiles. These exiles have adventures similar to those in Scandinavian sagas.

The birth of the People's Republic of Antarctica

Ffel
This book is prescient. Written in 1983, it manages to paint a near perfect picture of our world from the 1990s on. A world where the utter contempt - no, complete and total disregard - for the masses is raised to an institutional level. It is an indictment of globalization; the new world order; UN peace-keeping and so forth and so on.

As civilization teeters on collapse and national boundaries are closed with governments doing nothing more than annoucing "Traspassers Will Be Shot!," a group of disaffected malcontents who had lived on the fringe even in the good times undertake a voyage to escape a glorious socialism that excludes all but a select few from benefits. What begins as a voyage of salvation rapidly becomes a journey rivaling Dante's descent in to Hell. The group - idealistic anarchists who are joined by extended family members and an egomanic opportunist in the guise of "the clear thinker," sail from from Sweden west and south, eventually arriving in Antarctica. The trip sees them pass through the Baltic, the English Channel and out into the Atlantic. Along the way, they are assailed by various forces and threats; all of which treat xenophobia as a normal state.

Their final destination is reached only after a brief sojourn on South Georgia Island. This halt - at what may be the last place on the planet where life is normal - ends abruptly when the rot of jealousy and corruption overtakes them. Moving on, they land in Antarctica, which they find has become the dumping ground for the perceived riff-raff of the world. It is nothing less than a vast concentration camp administered by presumably earnest charities and aggressively pragmatic governments operating under the notion that liberal and progressive words can mask what is really underway. It is here that Grim Fiddle - the leader of the group - moves into the forefront of a rebellion that is more a response to certain death than political motivation.

Quarter is not asked for nor given. It appears - as combatants change sides at will and massacres are the standard - that no one has any firm beliefs they are defending. Instead, it is anarchy at the literal and figurative end of the world. When Grim Fiddle tricks hundreds into staying in an ice cave rather than seeking shelter, he is - in point of fact - representing exactly what the world had done in Dafur, in Somalia, in Tibet, in Uganda, in Syria...namely nothing. Eventually, Fiddle is betrayed by those most close to him as a sham entity, The Peoples' Republic of Antartica is established. This bastard creation - birthed and led by the aforementioned clear thinker - a man so twisted in his view of the world that he comes across as Gollum in the body of Tom Keefer from The Caine Mutiny - provides something with which the so-called civlized world can negotiate. And so, Fiddle - now the scapegoat for all that has occurred before, during and after his participation - bears the full and sole brunt of punishment for the world's misdeed. He is imprisoned for life. But, in the end, the "perpetrator" of these heinous crimes is simply let go because the so-called civilized world, the so-called intellectuals, the so called progressive thinkers are simply too weary from their own self-absorbed indulgent beliefs in forgiveness to do anything else.
showtime
I read this book when it first came out and it always stuck with me. Years later I knew I had to read it again. As I was re-reading it, I again thought this would make a great movie with someone like G. Lucas , Spielberg, C. Nolan or Bryan Singer directing. It has a potential for a lot of incredible action sequences and great character development. I highly recommend this book.
Mala
This is well written, but I can not recommend it. I should say that there are many parts that have the flashes of brilliance, and other sections that remain confusing and contradictory. Perhaps some might say this is because it is all told in the first person, the ravings of a mad man. Perhaps it is that I simply don't want to read the ravings of a mad man.

The title belies the text. The People's Republic of Antarctica itself is no more than a footnote- it more is the story of the life of Grim Fiddle, taking place mostly on the Atlantic Ocean in various places. I enjoyed the descriptions of life on the waves, for I enjoy the waters of the deep. But I picked up the text hoping to hear about a Republic in Antarctica, as there is so little future history or imaginations that continent. Instead we follow Grim as he lives in Norse legend from his birth in Scandinavia as an American-Swede, down the length of the Atlantic Ocean to the Falklands and other islands of the South. Throughout there is portent of greatness about Grim, and one expects much to come out of it. One ends up with disappointment.

This tale is dark, and one keeps hoping for some Joy, some recompense, but the desire are stifled. Yes, it goes in places you would not expect, and I commend Batchelor for his work and effort in that regard, and in others. But the lines between what one expects and what one ultimately receives are not clearly drawn. It may well be the revelation of the mind of a mass-murderer- but if so, we the readers come to identify and relate to a Grim, in his first thirty years, and he suddenly becomes an evil man and destroyer of peoples. Yes, there are some glimmers of this earlier on, but there truly is no transition to this change- you are suddenly presented with the new Grim, and the only explanation is a confused interlude tale told in epic Nordic style.

But I speak too harshly of this book. For Batchelor truly opens up the mind of the man, Grim. You move with him and the events that occurred. And it is a harsh tale, but realistic, of the depths of depravity of man. There is much to be said on the question of what *will* we do with all the refugees, the huddled masses on our teeming shores, that increase year after year in this new century.

I hold this against the story: it is told as confessional, but without real remorse. Better yet, there is remorse, but not real anguish, nor the repentance that can be seen in renewed Hope. It is depression, and I declare that depression is not Reality- Hope is present, and is powerful. The author would fashion in one's mind a falsehood that rings of Truth.

If this review was at all confusing, it was told in the same style as the book.