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Download Amphibians and Reptiles of Texas: With Keys, Taxonomic Synopses, Bibliography, and Distribution Maps fb2

by James R. Dixon
Download Amphibians and Reptiles of Texas: With Keys, Taxonomic Synopses, Bibliography, and Distribution Maps fb2
  • Author:
    James R. Dixon
  • ISBN:
    0890963584
  • ISBN13:
    978-0890963586
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Texas A & M University Press; 1st edition (1987)
  • Pages:
    434 pages
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1358 kb
  • ePUB format
    1986 kb
  • DJVU format
    1573 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    982
  • Formats:
    azw lrf mobi docx


Map showing the distribution of areas that include sites proposed for monitoring of amphibians and reptiles of EU. .New distributional records of amphibians and reptiles from the Titus County, Texas.

Map showing the distribution of areas that include sites proposed for monitoring of amphibians and reptiles of EU Community Interest from Romania. Article January 1998.

Электронная книга "Amphibians and Reptiles of Texas: With Keys, Taxonomic Synopses, Bibliography, and Distribution Maps", James Ray Dixon

Электронная книга "Amphibians and Reptiles of Texas: With Keys, Taxonomic Synopses, Bibliography, and Distribution Maps", James Ray Dixon. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Amphibians and Reptiles of Texas: With Keys, Taxonomic Synopses, Bibliography, and Distribution Maps" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Описание: This book examines the means by which alien reptiles and amphibians are transported by.It focuses on the biology of amphibians and reptiles, and the rich folklore of New York State as it pertains to amphibians and reptiles, particularly rattlesnakes.

Описание: This book examines the means by which alien reptiles and amphibians are transported by humans. It provides the first comprehensive database of herpetofaunal introductions worldwide and the first globally comprehensive pathway analysis for alien herpetofauna.

JAMES R. DIXON is professor emeritus at Texas A&M University and curator emeritus of amphibians and reptiles at the . As a biologist in Texas I bought this book given the updated taxonomy and range maps. DIXON is professor emeritus at Texas A&M University and curator emeritus of amphibians and reptiles at the Texas Cooperative Wildlife Collection. However for those amateurs and casual naturalists, this is perhaps not the book you want. This is NOT a field guide, it is pretty academic.

New Biological Books. Amphibians and Reptiles of Texas: With Keys, Taxonomic Synopses, Bibliography, and Distribution Maps.

Dixon, James R. Published by College Station: Texas A & M University Press,. Complete keys to all species are provided. No ownership marks and no signs of use. Corner of front endpaper is clipped; a bright and clean copy in fine condition. Bookseller Inventory 6670. Ask Seller a Question. Bibliographic Details. Publisher: College Station: Texas A & M University Press,. Publication Date: 1987.

Amphibians and Reptiles of Texas: With Keys, Taxonomic Synopses, Bibliography, and Distribution Maps James R. Dixon.

Situated at the junction of four major physiographic divisions of North America, Texas provides many varied habitats for amphibians and reptiles.In this new edition of Amphibians and Reptiles of Texas, James R. Dixon adds to and updates the extensive information given in the highly valued first edition published in 1987. The many helpful features of this book include an updated listing of the literature on Texas amphibians and reptiles and a brief history of important herpetological publications, investigators, and authors.This volume covers more than 150 years of inquiry and is testimony to the careers of many distinguished herpetologists, including French botanist Jean Louis Berlandier, who encountered Texas herpetofauna during his travels from 1828 to 1834.More than 150 maps show the distribution records for Texas herpetofauna. The book also contains an identification key supplemented by drawings, photographs, a glossary, and scientific and common names to aid both professional and amateur herpetologists.For this new edition Dixon has added a section on conservation issues that highlights the threats to the continued survival of amphibians and reptiles, particularly commercial collecting and habitat destruction.Herpetologists, environmentalists, wildlife specialists, and all those who love the outdoors will find this guide invaluable for identifying and understanding the species they encounter.

BoberMod
This book is probably invaluable to someone with scientific knowledge of reptiles and has the subject in front of them so, that by the process of elimination, they can determine exactly what they have. If however you are looking for something with pictures (there are black and white pictures of some of the subject matter) so you can try to determine what just slithered or scurried under your car or into your flowerbed, this is not the book for you. I'm sure the author is an excellent authority on the subject and to the initiated, this looks like an excellent resource tool and should be rated five stars. But, for me, I found it difficult to determine, with certainty, what I was looking for.
Bumand
Book arrived in excellent condition and ahead of time. Great service. Would highly recommend the seller.
Lianeni
Dixon's book is an important research tool for professional and amateur herpetologists working with the amphibians and reptiles of Texas who need to 1) refer to a rich bibliography of about 3,500 references that is current as of April 1999 - more than half of which are new since the 1987 first edition, 2) have distribution maps for all the native Texas amphibians and reptiles based on more than 13,000 county records covering more than 110,000 localities, 3) keep current with taxonomic changes, 4) refer to identification keys, and/or 5) understand the problems facing the continued survival of these animals in the face of commercial collecting and habitat destruction.
The book is composed of four major sections - A) keys (40 pages covering salamanders, frogs and toads, amphibian larvae, turtles, lizards, and snakes), B) species accounts (115 pages), C) distribution maps (94 pages with 162 maps), and C) a bibliography (143 pages). There are also shorter sections covering an 86-term glossary, indices of common (about 425) and scientific (about 550) names, and a few (25) black and white photos.
While the book is not suitable, in my estimation, as a field guide; it is nonetheless an excellent, annotated, and comprehensive bibliographic reference for serious students of the full range of Texas amphibians and reptiles. Under each genus and species account, in addition to the comments and distribution maps, a sometimes lengthy list of bibliographic references from among the 3,500 cited in this book is shown for further look-up as desired. This is a very effective way of cross referencing, by species, a shelf of additional material that I grossly estimate to be perhaps ten feet or so wide. I suggest that the most effective use of this thorough and well-researched book is in conjunction with nicely illustrated and somewhat more self-contained guides to Texas herps such as Werler and Dixon's Texas Snakes, Conant's Field Guide to Reptiles & Amphibians of Eastern & Central North America (Peterson Field Guide Series), or Vermersch's Lizards and Turtles of South Central Texas - for any of which this book is a particularly excellent and useful companion.
As time goes on, the late-1990's content of Dixon's book will need to be updated again (the first edition of this work was released 13 years before the current edition) or it will cease to be as current and useful as it still is even today - some five years after its 2000 publication. On the other hand, even if not timely updated, this book will remain an excellent and vital snapshot in time of the literature and known distribution of the Texas herpetofauna. Anyone wishing to enhance or complete their knowledge of specific Texas herps should certainly refer to this book or consider adding this excellent, moderately priced book to their herp library depending upon how often they wish to refer to it.
As an afterword, it is interesting to note that most books - certainly those able to pass the rigors of marketing scrutiny that commercial publishers require today before a book is accepted for publication - don't need operating instructions; one just needs merely to read the book. Unfortunately, however, this book is different. Because of its rather unusual style and content, the appearance of the book is not "friendly", and at first blush it seems to contain a lot of arcane tabular data and mysterious code without adequate plain English text to "decode" it. Of course this is not the case. This tabular information and code is the meat of Dixon's book, being the wealth of the distribution data and the excellent, cross-referenced bibliographic references. One should try to visualize that with the use of this book there is a ten-foot long shelf of accompanying reference material stretched across a library table, and that this book is the codex that translates between that wealth of outstanding reference material and shorter, more user-friendly herp reference books. With this understanding, the true value of Dixon's book can be appreciated.
Just note that although the book has been in print for nearly four years as of the time of this writing, there has been only one short review of this book on Amazon.com, titled "Book Not For Amateurs", which states that "Unless you are a serious student of herpetology, do not buy this book. It does not contain photos or descriptions intended for the use of the general public, but tables and numbers that mean nothing to me. If you don't know what you are looking for, you are certainly not going to find it here. This was an expensive lesson for me to learn. I hope this prevents someone else from doing the same."
How sad to read that poor Amazon.com review: I can only hope it didn't discourage anyone who could have benefited from reading/using Dixon's fine book. Proof positive of the absolute need for this book review!
END
Shliffiana
Dixon's guide is far better than the Peterson, Texas Monthly and Audubon guides when it comes to narrowing down the species/subspecies of a specific county. With many reptiles and amphibians this information alone can decide a difficult identification. Also, the bibliography section has led me to many in-depth reports and studies. If you are only interested in looking at paintings or uncharacteristic photographs of these animals, I encourage you to consult the usual field guides. However, if you are a professional or an amateur willing to put this book to work, there is no other Texas resource like it.

My only complaint is that we could sure use a 2005 update. Also, Dixon's insightful comments under the species accounts (updated in the 2000 edition)would be even better if they were more extensive.
Pooker
Unless you are a serious student of herpetology, do not buy this book. It does not contain photos or descriptions intended for the use of the general public, but tables and numbers that mean nothing to me. If you don't know what you are looking for, you are certainly not going to find it here.
This was an expensive lesson for me to learn. I hope this prevents someone else from doing the same.