» » Death in Five Boxes

Download Death in Five Boxes fb2

by Carter Dickson
Download Death in Five Boxes fb2
  • Author:
    Carter Dickson
  • ISBN:
    0553203738
  • ISBN13:
    978-0553203738
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Bantam Books; First edition (1982)
  • Pages:
    192 pages
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1961 kb
  • ePUB format
    1115 kb
  • DJVU format
    1989 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    478
  • Formats:
    lrf doc mbr mobi


John Dickson Carr) is certainly the master of the locked-room mystery, a category which might as well be named after him. In "Death in Five Boxes," Carr presents not a locked-room mystery but a nonetheless apparently impossible crime. A gathering of five people ends when four of them are found unconscious and nearly dead from atropine poisoning. The fifth faired far less well; he was dead, stabbed

Eligible for FREE super saving shipping.

John Dickson Carr) is certainly the master of the locked-room mystery, a category which might as well be named after him. In Death in Five Boxes. Eligible for FREE super saving shipping.

Death in Five Boxes is a mystery novel by the American writer John Dickson Carr, who published it under the name of Carter Dickson. It is a whodunnit and features the series detective Sir Henry Merrivale and his associate, Scotland Yard's Chief. It is a whodunnit and features the series detective Sir Henry Merrivale and his associate, Scotland Yard's Chief Inspector Humphrey Masters. Dr. John Sanders, a serious young forensic scientist, is stopped by a pretty young girl late at night.

Death in Five Boxes book. See a Problem? We’d love your help.

Here's another greatly under appreciated book in the Sir Henry Merrivale series. This has - flat out - the best opening of any of the books in the series

Here's another greatly under appreciated book in the Sir Henry Merrivale series. This has - flat out - the best opening of any of the books in the series. The first three chapters whiz by and are as action-filled as one of the dizzying comic book hero movies that are flooding the cinemas these days. A young girl runs out of the rainy darkness into the arms of a passing doctor, pleading with him to go inside the building across the street and rescue her father only to discover a roomful of drugged people and one stabbed corpse.

Download (epub, 216 Kb). FB2 PDF MOBI TXT RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format. Last updated September 14, 2019. John Dickson Carr writing as "Carter Dickson". The fifth faired far less well; he was dead, stabbed

Published by Dell, New York, 1946. Condition: Very Good. Items are returnable within 5 days for any reason. Books will be sent via USPS.

Published by Dell, New York, 1946. From Mordida Books (Houston, TX, . Price: US$ 3. 0 Convert Currency.

Carter Dickson (a.k.a. John Dickson Carr) is certainly the master of the locked-room mystery, a category which might as well be named after him. In "Death in Five Boxes," Carr presents not a locked-room mystery but a nonetheless apparently impossible crime. A gathering of five people ends when four of them are found unconscious and nearly dead from atropine poisoning. The fifth faired far less well; he was dead, stabbed. As the room in which the five were found was not locked, the crime should be an easy one. But there's a slight catch; it seems impossible that anyone, whether a member of the group or an outsider, could have put the poison into the drinks. Sir Henry Merrivale, Carr's best character, is determined to solve the crime, though, and he naturally does so. Along the way, we learn that the five people who were at the table have many secrets, all of which only serve to cloud the mystery. "Death in Five Boxes" is an excellent novel for those who would like to be able finally to solve one of Carr's puzzles. The solution is perhaps the most obvious of any of his novels or short stories, though it should be pointed out that "obvious" and Carr's name do not lend themselves to use in the same paragraph. The novel might be better for aspiring mystery novelists. With such a (relatively) obvious solution, the book becomes an exercise in the mastery of hiding the obvious. Though the novel is far from Carr's best, either as a simple story or as an impossible mystery, the way in which this undisputed master goes about hiding the truth while playing entirely by the rules is something to behold.

Aria
Great.
Goktilar
Dr. John Sanders is walking home through Bloomsbury, having stayed on past midnight analyzing arsenic-laced ice cream in the laboratory of the Harris Institute of Toxicology. The street seems deserted, until a young woman speaks to him. She's not the kind of girl you see out this late alone, and she's very upset. She's a sketch artist, and has recognized the young doctor from his court appearances as an expert witness in poisoning trials . She's worried about her father, a prominent surgeon, who acted strangely today before going out to keep a late appointment. He even made a new will, as if he might have expected danger. She has found the house where her father should be, but is afraid to go in alone. Will he go in with her?

Inside the unlocked apartment at the top of an 18th century house, its lower floors occupied by various offices, they find her father and three others seated around a large table, limp as melting waxworks. The three guests are unconscious but breathing, apparently drugged by something in the cocktails they were drinking. The host, an investment broker, is unmistakably dead, run through by a narrow blade like that of a swordstick. Dr. Sanders thinks, given prompt treatment, the guests will survive, to the relief to the surgeon's daughter. An old clerk working late in one of the downstairs offices identifies the other two. One is his employer, a dealer in Egyptian antiquities, the other, the only woman, an art dealer and consultant.

After warning the young people that everyone in that apartment was a criminal (even the surgeon!) and they should try to forget what they saw there, the clerk disappears. Someone, it seems, murdered the broker while the others were unconscious, but the three survivors are unanimous in saying that no one had a chance to tamper with their drinks. They could hardly have intended to commit mass suicide (though the atropine would have been deadly, had they emptied their glasses), and no one else was there. All three insist none of them is guilty of anything at all, but it's always possible they don't know each other quite as well as they pretend to. Or even themselves.

This is sort of an old-fashioned gothic romance tinged mystery, more reminiscent of Austin Freeman or J.S. Fletcher than the average mystery of the thirties. The chance meeting on a dark street, the emotional tone, the creepy old house, the swordstick, and even the mummy (!) all evoke the Victorian novel of sensation. Still, I enjoyed it more than some other Carr/Dickson novels since story line and puzzle plot are more or less integrated, there's a bit more emphasis on story than puzzle, and the characters behave and interact more credibly than usual in this series.. The writing is good. The Falstaffian Sir Henry Merrivale, however, always strikes me somehow as a character out of a different story.
Beydar
Carter Dickson (a.k.a. John Dickson Carr) is certainly the master of the locked-room mystery, a category which might as well be named after him. In "Death in Five Boxes," Carr presents not a locked-room mystery but a nonetheless apparently impossible crime. A gathering of five people ends when four of them are found unconscious and nearly dead from atropine poisoning. The fifth faired far less well; he was dead, stabbed. As the room in which the five were found was not locked, the crime should be an easy one. But there's a slight catch; it seems impossible that anyone, whether a member of the group or an outsider, could have put the poison into the drinks.
Sir Henry Merrivale, Carr's best character, is determined to solve the crime, though, and he naturally does so. Along the way, we learn that the five people who were at the table have many secrets, all of which only serve to cloud the mystery.
"Death in Five Boxes" is an excellent novel for those who would like to be able finally to solve one of Carr's puzzles. The solution is perhaps the most obvious of any of his novels or short stories, though it should be pointed out that "obvious" and Carr's name do not lend themselves to use in the same paragraph. The novel might be better for aspiring mystery novelists. With such a (relatively) obvious solution, the book becomes an exercise in the mastery of hiding the obvious. Though the novel is far from Carr's best, either as a simple story or as an impossible mystery, the way in which this undisputed master goes about hiding the truth while playing entirely by the rules is something to behold.