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  • ISBN:
    0919568386
  • ISBN13:
    978-0919568389
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  • Publisher:
    Alive Press
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Lobsticks are traditional markers found in the Boreal Forests of Canada created by removing the middle (or lower) branches of a coniferous (pine) tree. The lobstick was created by cutting off most of the lower branches of tall pine or spruce trees. The remaining tuft on the top would make the tree conspicuous from a distance. Occasionally other trees surrounding the lobstick would be cut down to further improve its visibility.

The lobstick was created by cutting off most of the lower branches of tall pine or spruce trees. In some instances, the bark was removed and names were carved on the wood. The usages could be both practical and symbolic. Lobsticks would mark trails or portages, sources of food, or hunting grounds

et a. Lobsticks Close. Are you sure you want to remove Lobsticks from your list? Lobsticks. lobstick, a spruce tree trimmed of all but the top branches : [poems. Published 1970 by Alive Press in Guelph, Ont. 188 p. ; Number of pages.

Occasionally other trees surrounding the lobstick would be cut down to. .

Occasionally other trees surrounding the lobstick would be cut down to further improve its visibility. Lobsticks would mark trails or portages, sources of food, or hunting grounds. They were also used as cultural markers, to signify meeting places, burial grounds, ceremonial sites, personal totems or to honour someone. Caroline Podruchny, in her book Making the Voyageur World: Travelers and Traders in the North American Fur Trade (University of Nebraska Press, 2006), documents the physical creation and the symbolic meaning of the lobstick tree for voyageurs in Canadas north. Indian tracking past lobstick near the Hayes River Canada, taken circa 1910. Lobsticks are traditional markers found in the Boreal Forests of Canada created by removing the middle (or lower) branches of a coniferous (pine) tree. Canada's Boreal forest comprises about one third of the circumpolar boreal forest that rings the Northern Hemisphere, mostly north of the 50th parallel.

Lobstick (or lopstick) is a tall, conspicuously situated spruce or pine tree with all but its topmost branches stripped or lopped off. This was done by northern Aboriginal people, and later by voyageurs, to turn trees into talismans, landmarks or memorials.

The shaped tree is both natural and culturally modified – rather like Canada . A tuft at the top made the tree easy to spot. There was a lobstick tree north of Prince Albert, Sask. where I grew up, near what is now the village of Paddockwood.

The shaped tree is both natural and culturally modified – rather like Canada itself. Nearby trees would be cut and hauled away, leaving the lobstick in rather lonely splendour. Story continues below advertisement. Lobsticks were both practical and symbolic. Pictures and stories from the earliest Euro-Canadian settlers describe a huge evergreen sitting in a field of grass, visible for miles in every direction.

also lobstick, n. Canadian. a tree trimmed of all but its topmost branches to serve as a landmark or marker.