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by David Lyon
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  • Author:
    David Lyon
  • ISBN:
    0877845786
  • ISBN13:
    978-0877845782
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  • Publisher:
    InterVarsity Press (1976)
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68) He concludes, "by 'Christian sociology' we do not mean a sociology that is utterly oblivious to all 'non-Christian' sociology, but rather one which develops its distinctive sociological presuppositions, and uses these to criticize or modify other sociologies.

68) He concludes, "by 'Christian sociology' we do not mean a sociology that is utterly oblivious to all 'non-Christian' sociology, but rather one which develops its distinctive sociological presuppositions, and uses these to criticize or modify other sociologies. that our Christian presuppositions have any relevance to our lives as sociologists. Thus we would defend the qualified use of the term 'Christian sociology.

Born in Edinburgh, Scotland, Lyon received a . c. in social science and history at the University of Bradford in Yorkshire, UK, fueling a fascination with driving forces behind and social consequences of some major transformations of the modern world.

One of the challenges is to those who engage in Surveillance Studies. A sociology of cyberspace is proposed that is at once historical, material, and ethical

Queen's University QueensU · Department of Sociology, Faculty of Law. 2. 4. One of the challenges is to those who engage in Surveillance Studies. A sociology of cyberspace is proposed that is at once historical, material, and ethical. That is to say, cyberspace is viewed as much in terms of its continuities as its disjuncture with the past, with physicality, and with normative approaches View.

Christian Social Critique. Questions of the information society, globalization, secularization, surveillance, and debates over post- and digital modernity feature prominently in his work. He brings a sociological perspective to bear on the issues raised by personal data processing in a database-dependent world.

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Pagan and Christian: Sociological Euhemerism Versus American Sociology of Religion. Much sociology continues to rest upon an anti-spiritual positivistic base that has blinded sociologists to understanding the orthodox religious believer

Pagan and Christian: Sociological Euhemerism Versus American Sociology of Religion. Much sociology continues to rest upon an anti-spiritual positivistic base that has blinded sociologists to understanding the orthodox religious believer. The worldview of the charismatic Christian believer is used as a case study to illustrate the illuminative potential of the Christian perspective.

Christians and Sociology book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Christians and Sociology.

Question: "What is sociology? Should a Christian study sociology?". Answer: Sociology is the study of social behavior, norms, origins, and development. It deals with the behavior of man-made institutions and organizations and how people behave when organized into groups, as opposed to individually. Since God is a relational Being, human beings are also relational. Part of being created in God’s image (Genesis 1:27) is that we are social creatures who naturally organize into societies. Sociology, then, can be seen as part of a broader study of human nature.

As we will necessarily discuss the biology and sociology of homosexuality, we will first .

As we will necessarily discuss the biology and sociology of homosexuality, we will first ask, in advance, the pardon of any who are made uncomfortable by hearing medical-especially, gy, which will figure in certain sections. And this is our challenge as Christians, that we not allow ourselves to be conformed to this age, but to the will for us of our loving Lord.

Book by Lyon, David

Nilador
At the time this book was published in 1975, David Lyon was a lecturer at Bingley College of Education in England. He now directs the Surveillance Studies Centre, is a Professor of Sociology, holds a Queen's Research Chair and is cross-appointed as a Professor in the Faculty of Law at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario. He has written many other books, such as Surveillance Studies: An Overview,Electronic Eye: The Rise of Surveillance Society,Postmodernity, etc.

He wrote in the Preface, "[Many] Christians ... are quite unprepared for the subtle and persistent tendency of sociology to erode faith and raise doubts. Very few have any idea of how a Christian might approach sociology. Some... manage to hold on to their 'faith,' but not always in a healthy way. They may just create separate compartments in their lives for faith and study, thus sacrificing their integrity. Others... discard [Christianity], feeling that sociological enlightenment and Christian faith are incompatible... This book is intended to help anyone who... is facing the challenge of sociology. It aims to show how the subject itself is based on certain assumptions, how Christians can learn from its challenges and deal creatively with them, and how, in time, they might contribute usefully as sociologists." (Pg. 7-8)

He points out, "Although, as Christians, we must often disagree with sociologists over basic assumptions, this does not mean that all sociological research is therefore invalid. Much excellent work in sociology has been done by non-Christians, and has achieved many God-pleasing results in society... there is a new chance today for Christians to make their contribution from a distinctive biblical position." (Pg. 29-31)

He asks, "WHAT do we believe to be true, and WHY do we believe that certain things are true? It is clearly not that Christian ideas are socially acceptable---because the majority do not believe them! ... It is really impossible to account fully in sociological terms for a change in belief, especially in a case such as that of Paul the apostle." (Pg. 42) He adds, "As Christians, we believe that there is knowledge which is undetermined by any social context, since it has been given, as it were, from outside... The self-disclosure of God yields principles and criteria for evaluating all ideas which originate from a purely human, social source." (Pg. 47-48)

He observes, "as Christians we will find that our sociology, all too often, is an examination of the effects of sin on society." (Pg. 65) He argues, "Man IS a slave to society, NOT because he is malleable, because he is a social pawn, but because he us fundamentally a slave to sin, and therefore to a sinful society." (Pg. 68) He concludes, "by 'Christian sociology' we do not mean a sociology that is utterly oblivious to all 'non-Christian' sociology, but rather one which develops its distinctive sociological presuppositions, and uses these to criticize or modify other sociologies... To talk merely of Christians IN sociology... denies... that our Christian presuppositions have any relevance to our lives as sociologists. Thus we would defend the qualified use of the term 'Christian sociology.'" (Pg. 87-88)

This is an interesting examination and discussion of a topic that is seldom addressed by evangelical Christians, and [despite the fact that this book is nearly forty years old] will be of considerable interest to any Christians concerned with sociology and its implications.
Fesho
At the time this book was published in 1975, David Lyon was a lecturer at Bingley College of Education in England. He now directs the Surveillance Studies Centre, is a Professor of Sociology, holds a Queen's Research Chair and is cross-appointed as a Professor in the Faculty of Law at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario. He has written many other books, such as Surveillance Studies: An Overview,Electronic Eye: The Rise of Surveillance Society,Postmodernity, etc.

He wrote in the Preface, "[Many] Christians ... are quite unprepared for the subtle and persistent tendency of sociology to erode faith and raise doubts. Very few have any idea of how a Christian might approach sociology. Some... manage to hold on to their 'faith,' but not always in a healthy way. They may just create separate compartments in their lives for faith and study, thus sacrificing their integrity. Others... discard [Christianity], feeling that sociological enlightenment and Christian faith are incompatible... This book is intended to help anyone who... is facing the challenge of sociology. It aims to show how the subject itself is based on certain assumptions, how Christians can learn from its challenges and deal creatively with them, and how, in time, they might contribute usefully as sociologists." (Pg. 7-8)

He points out, "Although, as Christians, we must often disagree with sociologists over basic assumptions, this does not mean that all sociological research is therefore invalid. Much excellent work in sociology has been done by non-Christians, and has achieved many God-pleasing results in society... there is a new chance today for Christians to make their contribution from a distinctive biblical position." (Pg. 29-31)

He asks, "WHAT do we believe to be true, and WHY do we believe that certain things are true? It is clearly not that Christian ideas are socially acceptable---because the majority do not believe them! ... It is really impossible to account fully in sociological terms for a change in belief, especially in a case such as that of Paul the apostle." (Pg. 42) He adds, "As Christians, we believe that there is knowledge which is undetermined by any social context, since it has been given, as it were, from outside... The self-disclosure of God yields principles and criteria for evaluating all ideas which originate from a purely human, social source." (Pg. 47-48)

He observes, "as Christians we will find that our sociology, all too often, is an examination of the effects of sin on society." (Pg. 65) He argues, "Man IS a slave to society, NOT because he is malleable, because he is a social pawn, but because he us fundamentally a slave to sin, and therefore to a sinful society." (Pg. 68) He concludes, "by 'Christian sociology' we do not mean a sociology that is utterly oblivious to all 'non-Christian' sociology, but rather one which develops its distinctive sociological presuppositions, and uses these to criticize or modify other sociologies... To talk merely of Christians IN sociology... denies... that our Christian presuppositions have any relevance to our lives as sociologists. Thus we would defend the qualified use of the term 'Christian sociology.'" (Pg. 87-88)

This is an interesting examination and discussion of a topic that is seldom addressed by evangelical Christians, and [despite the fact that this book is nearly forty years old] will be of considerable interest to any Christians concerned with sociology and its implications.