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by Ethan Canin
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  • Author:
    Ethan Canin
  • ISBN:
    0747597456
  • ISBN13:
    978-0747597452
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    BLOOMSBURY PUBLISHING PLC; First British Edition edition (2008)
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1424 kb
  • ePUB format
    1720 kb
  • DJVU format
    1974 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    346
  • Formats:
    mbr rtf lit mobi


America America book. Ethan Canin is a talent beyond his years. His writing style is calm and fluid. One of the best aspects of the book is the reflections that the narrator makes on his own daughters.

America America book.

Then he says, The Oaks. That’s what they’re calling i. .We’re coming down from our regular outing in the Shelter Brook Set-Aside, the land that Liam Metarey preserved. Every week, we take a meandering hike up the short slope that looks over the last stretch of undeveloped terrain between the old Silverton Orchards and Saline. Well, I say, I guess there’s nothing I’d put past them. Just surprised I hadn’t heard about i.

Ethan Canin: America America began for me as a smaller idea. Originally, it was only the story of Corey Sifter, a working-class boy, who falls in love with Christian Metarey, an aristocratic girl. I’d written about 250 pages of that novel when the attacks occurred on September 11, 2001; and that morning, as it turned out, was the last time I wrote fiction for close to two years. In creating the novel’s man of history, did you intentionally draw upon the 1969 Chappaquiddick affair and Senator Kennedy’s prominent career?

Ethan Canin's America America is just such a book, the satisfying, compulsively readable saga .

Ethan Canin's America America is just such a book, the satisfying, compulsively readable saga of a northeastern coal dynasty. B+. The Independent - James Urquhart. The rhythms of a great estate, and the dynamics of a landowning family, are captured with Tolstoyan exactitude.

Yet it is also touching: an epic lament for the loss of idealism, and brave enough to leave many of its mysteries unsolved.

Working class men - Fiction, Rich people - Fiction, Upper class women - Fiction, Character - Fiction, Large type books, New York (State) - Politics and government - Fiction, United States - Politics and government - Fiction.

As his earlier novels, like Carry Me Across the Water and For Kings and Planets, have demonstrated, this accomplished short-story writer has never seemed completely at ease with the long-distance form of the novel, and America America is no exception.

Ethan Andrew Canin (born July 19, 1960) is an American author, educator, and physician. He is a member of the faculty of the Iowa Writers' Workshop at the University of Iowa. Canin was born in Ann Arbor, Michigan, while his parents were vacationing from Iowa City, where his father, Stuart Canin, taught violin at the University of Iowa

Ethan Canin, who first made his name as a short-story writer, has turned his hand to a big, fat state-of-the-union novel. The subject matter is classical US fare, but Canin passes this literary test with flying colours.

Ethan Canin, who first made his name as a short-story writer, has turned his hand to a big, fat state-of-the-union novel. The narrator, Corey Sifter, is a 50-year-old Michigan newspaperman, who in his youth was co-opted by a powerful local family into Democratic politics. This epic narrative moves from Sifter's blue-collar childhood through to his involvement with presidential hopeful, Sen. Henry Bonwiller, whose campaign is undone in a moment.

Canin employs with great skill Corey’s double vision: the bedazzled loyalty of the teenager, the chastened worldview of the parent. Bonwiller’s campaign implodes; the consequences for the Metareys are brutal

Canin employs with great skill Corey’s double vision: the bedazzled loyalty of the teenager, the chastened worldview of the parent. Bonwiller’s campaign implodes; the consequences for the Metareys are brutal. The novel is not flawless (Liam, the central character, proves elusive) but the detail work is quite wonderful: The rhythms of a great estate, and the dynamics of a landowning family, are captured with Tolstoyan exactitude.


Enalonasa
A fictional account of politics in the Nixon era and the story of a young working class youth exposed to the political hypocrisies of doing socially good while exploiting the need for power and control. How this exposure influenced his development and the innuendos of what goes on behind closed doors is pertinent to today's political climate.
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This is a well-written story of political intrigue; historical fiction within my memory. It is also a coming-of-age story and here is where it is incomplete. The narrator is entwined with the daughters of his employer yet the author provides virtually no physical description of anyone outside of the male characters. We learn that the daughter that is his age has green eyes and that she has a sister but it is unclear if she is older or younger. The father is described and the candidate is described most fully. We know that the narrator is tall, like his father and the candidate (and the candidate's son). That's about it. Obviously, the narrator learned a lot about love and life from the two daughters but the treatment of those events is prudish - especially for a story built around an extra-marital affair. If the author had provided a description of the characters equal to that he provided for the physical setting, it would be a terrific book.
AfinaS
This quirky book presents a thought provoking reprise of the oft-times unbelievable details of recent American political history. The relationships of the foreground characters sometimes seem a little too precious for words, but the richness of the (true) background personalities and composites grounds the whole. A terrific book club choice, the reader is invited to add his/her own moral dimension to the flow of the action in ways that probe the essence of our citizenship in late 20th Century America. Especially timely in an National election year -- but then, hasn't running for election overtaken governing as the true work of our current political class. Shame on us, the American voter, for not paying attention while our democracy was sold to the highest bidders.
Hra
One of the best novels I have read. I found myself reading this book as a writer, paying attention how Canin developed the characters, stories, and scenery -- all visible in my minds'-eye. I have become quite a fan of his writing and will be reading more of his work in the very near future.
Malak
This novel would work better for me in diary format or as random reminiscences and without the bait of an important disclosure. Narrated mostly in first person, the episodes that compose the novel do not lead to a climax and do not fulfill expectations. As the story begins, Corey Sifter, the narrator sets the scene for a revelation ("That I would be the one to bring it back now, after all this time"), but also warns the reader that he only knows part of it and has had to guess at other parts. I was certainly willing to go along with him and a novel with such an ambitious title until I began to suspect that Sifter was an apt name for this narrator. He was indeed sifting through a mixture of events, storylines, and themes. Still, I kept expecting the novel to come together. Unfortunately for me, it did not, and I became more and more dissatisfied with the narrator, who like most of his major figures remains blurred. Let me add that the narrator is a newpaper reporter and publisher, so I expected a more definitive story.

Ethan Canin is certainly an important name in current fiction, and I do not mean to disagree with those readers who loved this book. I write more for other readers who perhaps chose not to quit even if they were not enchanted with the novel.

If pressed to give a plot summary, I could only say that the the book seems to set out to reveal a political scandal revolving around a Senator Henry Bonwiller, but meets up with a coming of age narrative, a narrative about the powerful immigrant Metarey family, and a father/son narrative. Themes of social class, economic status, ambition, ethics, and loyalty weave throughout these. First person sometimes gives way to third person, and the story, which is set mainly in a small New York State town, advances in episodic fashion. It starts in 2006, but immediately jumps back to 1971 and the era of the Vietnam War. Although Corey Sifter is around college age, he never mentions student anti-war unrest, demonstrations, or protests, so a portion of the social and political fabric of the time and of his generation is missing. The omission seems especially significant considering that part of this story is a coming of age tale. A young male in college at that time would surely have had to grapple with the politics of war and of the draft.

A major portion of the novel is devoted to the hazy story of Senator Bonwiller's attempt to run for President on the Democratic ticket and a scandal that gets in his way. Liam Metarey is a major supporter of Bonwiller, but young Corey Sifter is a sort of errand boy for the campaign, and politically innocent or ignorant. I do not understand why the author chose a person twice removed from the proceedings, by age and by involvement, to tell this tale, which in the end reveals more doubts than certainties. This narrator begins in doubts and ends in doubts. He also leaves major chinks in his story.

If you want a book that makes you think about what the author is trying to get across, this is the book for you. I am not a reader that demands that all ends be tied up or that does not want to read a challenging book, but this one I would not read again. I do demand that a book touch me in some way, and this one is just a ramble.
Fearlessdweller
In this era of political uncertainty and the seeming lack of moral fiber and personal integrity this book raises questions and issues that bring it all to the fore. So worth reading and pondering the what ifs of American politics and it's candidates.
Hawk Flying
i liked this book because i'm interested in authors who can tell a good story about people. i also enjoy long family sagas, and can really indulge in a voyeuristic journey into other people's lives....'downton abbey'? so this book seems to create an engaging historical novel through the story of its characters.
i would recommend this book to people who like character development and historical settings.
The story times flit back and forth and I had to keep readjusting my background thinking to put it all in place. It was a bit annoying to keep up.