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by Peter Malanczuk
Download Humanitarian intervention and the legitimacy of the use of force fb2
  • Author:
    Peter Malanczuk
  • ISBN:
    9073052564
  • ISBN13:
    978-9073052567
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    M. Nijhoff International (distributor) (1993)
  • Language:
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    1250 kb
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  • DJVU format
    1882 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    762
  • Formats:
    lit lrf mobi docx


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the Law of Humanitarian Intervention in i. . 24; P. Malanczuk, Humanitarian Intervention and the Legitimacy of the Use of Force 91993); B. Simma, NATO, the UN and the Use of Force& in 10 EJIL (1999), p. 1; and (semi) official reports by inter alia the Danish Institute of International Affairs, Humanitarian Intervention: Legal and Political Aspects (1999). 1 Humanitarian Intervention and Article 2(4) of the UN Charter Most proponents of humanitarian intervention contend that the prohibition of the use of force is not incompatible with the concept of humanitarian intervention.

Peter Malanczuk, Humanitarian Intervention and the Legitimacy of the Use of Force, Amsterdam: Het . Foreign Policy, Lexington Mass.

Peter Malanczuk, Humanitarian Intervention and the Legitimacy of the Use of Force, Amsterdam: Het Spinhuis, 1993Google Scholar. Adam Roberts, ‘Humanitarian War: Military Intervention and Human Rights’, International Affairs, vol. 69, no. 3, pp. 429–50CrossRefGoogle Scholar. Nigel Rodley (e., To Loose the Bands of Wickedness: International Intervention in Defence of Human Rights, London: Brassey’s, 1992. Lexington Books, 1979, pp. 199–213.

Malanczuk Peter, Humanitarian intervention and the Legitimacy of the Use of Force, Het Spinhuis-University .

Malanczuk Peter, Humanitarian intervention and the Legitimacy of the Use of Force, Het Spinhuis-University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, 1993. Sovereignty and Intervention. The author concludes, however, that tempering the harshness of the law of war with human rights values alone will be limited by the present parameters of humanitarian law and the prevailing societal values.

This fine book is good at destroying illusions, but . As she notes, "the opposition between collective humanitarian intervention and inactivity is a false one.

This fine book is good at destroying illusions, but short on proposals for changing things. During the 1990s, advocates of humanitarian intervention promised a world in which democracy, self-determination and human rights would trump national interests and imperial ambitions. Indeed, intervention in the name of humanitarianism too readily provides an alibi for the continued involvement of those interested in exploiting and controlling the resources and people of target states.

Malanczuk, Peter, Humanitarian Intervention and the Legitimacy of the Use of Force (Het Spinhuis, Amsterdam, 1993). Mandelbaum, Michael, Foreign Policy as Social Work, 74 Foreign Affairs (1996), 16–32. Mapel, David . Military Intervention and Rights, 20 Millennium: Journal of International Studies (1991), 41–55.

Humanitarian Intervention has been defined as a state's use of military force against another state, with publicly stating its goal is to end human rights violations in that state. This definition may be too narrow as it precludes non-military forms of intervention such as humanitarian aid and international sanctions.

2 While the subject has been part of the Just War discourse for centuries, and many important works on humanitarian intervention were published during.

Humanitarian Intervention and the Responsibility to Protect: Who Should Intervene? .

Humanitarian Intervention and the Responsibility to Protect: Who Should Intervene? By James Pattison. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010. 2) While the subject has been part of the Just War discourse for centuries, and many important works on humanitarian intervention were published during the later Cold War years (. Lillich, ed. 1973; Bull, ed.

Humanitarian Intervention

Humanitarian Intervention. The United Nations, formed in the aftermath of World War II to promote peace and stability, recognizes the importance of sovereignty, especially for newly independent nations or those seeking independence from colonizers. The willingness to use armed force is also inevitably influenced not only by the desperation of the affected population but also by geopolitical factors, including the relevance of the country to the world community, regional stability, and the attitudes of other major players, say experts. role as standard bearer for the R2P concept remains a question.