Download The bookshop fb2

by Penelope Fitzgerald
Download The bookshop fb2
  • Author:
    Penelope Fitzgerald
  • ISBN:
    0715613200
  • ISBN13:
    978-0715613207
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Duckworth; F First Edition Used edition (1978)
  • Pages:
    118 pages
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1798 kb
  • ePUB format
    1414 kb
  • DJVU format
    1661 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    628
  • Formats:
    doc lit lrf mobi


Электронная книга "The Bookshop", Penelope Fitzgerald. PENELOPE FITZGERALD (1916–2000) was one of the most elegant and distinctive voices in British fiction

Электронная книга "The Bookshop", Penelope Fitzgerald. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Bookshop" для чтения в офлайн-режиме. PENELOPE FITZGERALD (1916–2000) was one of the most elegant and distinctive voices in British fiction. She won the National Book Critics Circle Award in fiction for The Blue Flower, the Booker Prize for Offshore, and three of her novels - The Bookshop,The Gate of Angels, and The Beginning of Spring - were short-listed for the Booker Prize.

This, Penelope Fitzgerald’s second novel, was her first to be shortlisted for the Booker Prize. It is set in a small East Anglian coastal town, where Florence Green decides, against polite but ruthless local opposition, to open a bookshop

This, Penelope Fitzgerald’s second novel, was her first to be shortlisted for the Booker Prize. It is set in a small East Anglian coastal town, where Florence Green decides, against polite but ruthless local opposition, to open a bookshop. She had a kind heart, but that is not much use when it comes to the matter of self-preservation

The Bookshop is a 1978 novel by the British author Penelope Fitzgerald. It was shortlisted for the Booker Prize.

The Bookshop is a 1978 novel by the British author Penelope Fitzgerald. The novel, set mainly in 1959, follows Florence Green, a middle-aged widow, who decides to open a bookshop in the small coastal town of Hardborough, Suffolk (a thinly-disguised version of Southwold). The location she chooses is the Old House, an abandoned, damp property said to be haunted by a "rapper" (a poltergeist).

Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. by. Penelope Fitzgerald.

Books by Penelope Fitzgerald: The Means of Escape. 10. The Blue Flower.

Penelope Fitzgerald was one of the most highly-regarded writers on the English literary scene. Apart from Iris Murdoch, no other writer has been shortlisted so many times for the Booker. Her last novel, ‘The Blue Flower’, was the book of its year, garnering extraordinary acclaim in Britain, America and Europe. This superb collection of stories, originally published in anthologies and newspapers, shows Penelope Fitzgerald at her very best. A collection of Penelope Fitzgerald’s short stories.

One of the most admired of all Penelope Fitzgerald's books, The Blue Flower was chosen as Book of the Year more than any other in 1995.

Save bookmarks and read as many as you like. One of the most admired of all Penelope Fitzgerald's books, The Blue Flower was chosen as Book of the Year more than any other in 1995. Her final book, it confirmed her reputation as one of the finest novelists of the century.

First edition. Florence Green opens a bookshop in an English seaside town and finds the nasty local people make her life a nightmare. 118 pages. cloth, dust jacket.. 8vo..

Thoginn
This is a well written and engaging book. I journeyed with Florence (the main character) throughout her efforts. And I hated it. But here’s why... the people in the book are largely awful, the main character clueless and naive, the townspeople mostly despicable in character... and it’s just too much like real life!! No happy endings here!! So sad!! However, you feel every bit of Florence’s puzzlement, her genuine effort, and in the end her shame as she internalizes the failure of the bookshop that is not entirely her fault (though she certainly contributed to it). Sigh. Poor Florence!
Cordabor
Interesting characters and compelling story, but ultimately the reader is left feeling duped. Every last hope is crushed underfoot in a way that makes you want to go to bed for at least 3 weeks. Would not recommend.
Welahza
A beautifully told tale of an ordinary but courageous woman who perseveres quietly in the face of adversity and betrayal. The end is sad but at the same time hopeful. I'll be thinking of this for a long time, which is what we want of books after all.
Ienekan
This is a very short tale but both interesting and remarkably well written about a strong minded and courageous woman. Certainly not at all a likely heroine. Not an ounce of romantic drivel here. These days, it is an absolute pleasure to read the English language so well constructed and with not a word wasted or out of place. When I had finished it, which was all too soon, I truly experienced a feeling of disappointment that it was ended so quickly. One of the very few books which kept me up one night reading without pause, until the bitter, sweet finish. For sheer enjoyment of language alone, I urge book-lovers to buy it. It really represents good value.
LiTTLe_NiGGa_in_THE_СribE
Independent bookshops have never had it easy. Although these days we are more likely to blame their downfall on e-book readers, online bookstores, and superstore saturation, there has always been one obstacle consistently standing in the way of a local retailer: a lack of readers. And in 1959, when Florence Green sets up shop in an English town that doesn't even have a fish-and-chips, a launderette, or a cinema, she discovers too late that what it also doesn't have is a market for books.

"The Bookshop" is, at once, a concisely comic lark and a scathing social commentary. The novel calls to mind the satire of Waugh and Forster and the entertainments of Graham Greene and Muriel Spark. And, in ways I suspect the author only somewhat intended, the story also echoes Conrad and Kipling; Penelope Fitzgerald brings the imperial mission back to the home front. After all, in spite of the greeting cards and travel books on display in the shop, Florence Green's objective smacks of a desire to bring culture to the natives, in the face of the resistance of the village's tribal hierarchy and caste system. And that culture arrives, comically and unexpectedly, in the form of a book by a "foreign-sounding" author named Nabokov.

Of course, to Florence Green, the motivation is less about fostering culture ("Culture is for amateurs," she insists) than it is about proving to herself, after her husband's death, that "she existed in her own right." When she sets up her shop in a long-abandoned, drafty old house, however, she meets the resistance of several aggravated local citizens, starting with Mr. Deben, who had been trying to sell his fish shop and who doesn't understand why she didn't take his property off his hands. But the chief opposition comes from Mrs. Gamart, the town's self-appointed doyenne, who simply resents that an upstart has the affront to take on a prominent role in the area's social scene without her guidance and approval. Suddenly, that leaky old house is essential to the development of Mrs. Gamart's latest venture: an arts center. Yet the problem isn't that Florence has opened her business in the wrong place but that she has set up shop at all.

What ensues is a battle Florence Green has little chance of winning, in spite of the aid offered by a precocious ten-year-old schoolchild (who turns out to be the most winsome presence of the novel) and by a reclusive widower who reminisces about the township's previous bookshop, which closed during his great-grandfather's day, before the last installments of "Dombey and Son" had arrived. Fitzgerald's novel is less about plot and character (most of the townsfolk are little more than types) than it is an incisive dissection of the backbiting, politics, and parochialism of a village resenting the intrusion of a relative newcomer. It's a story that's been told often enough, but it's very rarely told this well.
Winawel
Florence Green spends her husband's insurance policy starting a bookshop in a haunted house. All of the town know about the "rappers" who haunt the house. She does her best to assimilate into the town but runs afoul of the self-proclaimed grand-dame of the town, Violet Gamart. Violet wants Florence's property for her own purposes and is willing to stop at nothing to get it. Florence is a nice woman who is unwilling to believe that even Violet would stoop so low.

The writing is quite nice in this book but we are left with lots of questions at the end of the book.
Anayajurus
This book is probably one of the best, yet criminally underrated, works of literature I have read in a long time. SPOILER ALERT: The synopsis is basic: Widow decides to open bookshop in community that has none. Bookshop struggles, does well briefly, then falls in popularity. High Society Doyenne finds way to evict bookshop lady, and crushes her dream. Sounds pretty bland, right? However, Fitzgerald is one more masterful writer, along with possessing a keen insight into human nature. She also understands how small towns, particularly those of the more isolated variety that the story is set in, tick. The bookshop is received fairly well by some, not so well by others, and on the whole, everybody works, whether consciously or unconsciously, to undermine the bookshop. Penelope Fitzgerald demonstrates that failure in life is not the greatest injustice one can endure; in fact, failure is an incredibly minor happenstance to the greatest injustice in life, which Florence Greene endures. That greatest injustice is living in a community, thinking you have a place in it, and finding out, when the floor vanishes beneath ones' feet, how truly unwanted you are in the place you have called home. This novel definitely doesn't have a happy ending, but it is very satisfying, but also very sad, so keep a box of tissues nearby for the last couple of chapters. I highly recommend this book.
The plot got lost somewhere. Kept reading, thinking it would get better. It just went downhill. Not sure what the author was trying to go with the story. I was disappointed. Thanks