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by Stephen Brook
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  • Author:
    Stephen Brook
  • ISBN:
    0241111145
  • ISBN13:
    978-0241111147
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Hamish Hamilton Ltd (January 1984)
  • Pages:
    256 pages
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1289 kb
  • ePUB format
    1286 kb
  • DJVU format
    1762 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    420
  • Formats:
    lrf lrf lit doc


Start by marking New York Days, New York Nights as Want to Read .

Start by marking New York Days, New York Nights as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Oct 29, 2018 Matthew rated it it was amazing.

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- Description - 1981-. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on July 16, 2013.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for New York Days, New . Good Condition: A book that has been read, but is in good condition.

Good Condition: A book that has been read, but is in good condition. Minimal damage to the book cover eg. scuff marks, but no holes or tears. If this is a hard cover, the dust jacket may be missing. Binding has minimal wear.

New York, Like Paris and London, is a city where writers switch on their propfessional noticing and recording. A good proportion of novelists seem to want to live there.

New York Days, New York Nights Paperback – 1985. But though Stephen Brook's journey through New York's unique experience is nothing less than encyclopedic, his experience seems to remain that of the outsider, the committed but still detached tourist

New York Days, New York Nights Paperback – 1985. by. Stephen Brook (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central. But though Stephen Brook's journey through New York's unique experience is nothing less than encyclopedic, his experience seems to remain that of the outsider, the committed but still detached tourist.

David Brooks, a New York Times Op-Ed columnist, writes about politics .

David Brooks, a New York Times Op-Ed columnist, writes about politics, culture and the social sciences. He is the author of Bobos in Paradise: The New Upper Class and How They Got There and On Paradise Drive: How We Live Now (And Always Have) in the Future Tense. In March 2011 he came out with his third book, The Social Animal: The Hidden Sources of Love, Character, and Achievement, which was a No. 1 New York Times best seller. Mr. Brooks also teaches at Yale University, and is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Show artist insights. Show artist insights.

New York Nights is a 1929 American pre-Code crime film, directed by Lewis Milestone, and based on the 1928 play Tin Pan Alley by Hugh Stanislaus Stange. The film is known for being leading actress Norma Talmadge's first sound film. Jill Deverne is a chorus girl married to alcoholic composer Fred. She wants to show Fred's latest song, A Year From Today, to racketeer Joe Prividi. Prividi is the producer of the musical show in which she is working, and agrees to use his song

Metro North Trains only travel from Grand Central and go to Upstate New York and Connecticut.

Client John Treacy Egan. Metro North Trains only travel from Grand Central and go to Upstate New York and Connecticut. When Michael travels back to New York alone, he is seen on a Metro North Train, again. When the characters are seen exiting the train into "Philadelphia", they are still in Grand Central Station.


Beanisend
I have just done another tour of New York. It's a city whose streets I have walked, whose life I have encountered, whose people I have known. But I have never been there. New York, Like Paris and London, is a city where writers switch on their propfessional noticing and recording. A good proportion of novelists seem to want to live there. It's a city where journalists apparently never have to travel far for a story and where social commentators uncover endless lines of interest. And in the early 1980s Stephen Brook, an English visitor, took his turn at plodding the streets, buttonholing the affluent and dabbling with low life in order to generate his book, New York Days, New York Nights.

It was a task he took seriously. His mission covered the city's politics, food, shopping, sexuality, power, social structure, ethnic relations, commerce, crime and apparently every other aspect of its existence, but with only scant regard for its history. We learn how on Manhattan air space can be traded, how the city's craving for constant change means that there is little sense of permanence. We visit late night bars and clubs, experience the gay-scene low-life at first hand, then at second hand and eventually at the level of the mutual anonymous grope. We visit jails, courts, police beats and other arresting areas. We talk to mayors, ex-mayors and would-be mayors. We feel debt and wealth in unequal measure. Stephen Brook appears not to want to leave any concrete block unturned.

But though Stephen Brook's journey through New York's unique experience is nothing less than encyclopedic, his experience seems to remain that of the outsider, the committed but still detached tourist. As each of the book's many chapters runs to its close and another opens, we can almost hear the writer begin with, "And here's another thing..." Well before the end we feel that the author is on a mission to collect in order to exhibit. In the end, we feel we have been on a city tour bus and listened to the commentary, but that we still have to walk the streets to begin the real experience.

But like all impressionistic descriptions of contemporary life, it becomes both less relevant and more interesting as it ages. It becomes irrelevant because its original concept is superseded, rendered mere whimsy by the passing of time. Its intention is to be contemporary, after all, and that quality is soon lost. But twenty-five years on, having been reminded that the city remains eager for constant change, it becomes fascinating to reflect on what has or might have changed. In 2009, we have a financial crisis, rich man's crime, an economy laden with unemployment and debt, recession and portent of doom and gloom. We also have celebrity, overt riches and conspicuous consumption alongside poverty, near-destitution, drug addiction and poor man's crime. So what's new?

One major change is that during Stephen Brook's journey, the existence of AIDS deserves mention, but little more. During visits to bath houses, the author experiences at first hand the workings, insertions, thrusts and suspended machinations of gay promiscuity - sorry, there is no other word - and the scenes he describes seem better fitted to a fantasy porn movie than any reality. A dimension we don't feel in all of this is the contrast with attitudes that one would expect to be prevalent in middle America. Surely it is that contrast that illustrates the difference between New York and the rest of the country?

But New York Days, New York nights remains a rich and rewarding trip. (The city's drug scene, but the way, is such an aspect of daily life that it deserves frequent but only passing comment.) Though the reader may occasionally tire of Stephen Brook's lengthy trek through the city, it is an account that has endured and that still interests, perhaps because the place itself and its people remain interesting.
Akinonris
1983 another era? Probably. 1983 New York another era? Definately. Hence, if you weren�t likely to find this title in the cheap bins before 9/11, then you are now. It and every other book written about New York before that date, in fact. Not that I think the author in this instance would mind too much. NEW YORK DAYS, NEW YORK NIGHTS isn�t a book that takes itself too seriously. There aren�t tracts of socio-economic theory to get bogged down in � in fact, only if granted a generous concession would NEW YORK DAYS, NEW YORK NIGHTS even licitly assume the guise of travel literature (at least, it�s not congruous with my perhaps stubborn understanding of what constitutes literature). The prose is light and casual, which reflects the manner in which Brook engages New York the subject, i.e., drink in hand, ever alert for the free ride. He touches on subjects as disparate as lawyers, the Chelsea hotel, Greenwich Village, sushi, the Met, Bellevue Hospital, newsanchors, zoning bylaws, gay bath houses, educational institutions, Rikers Island, the judicial system, the Left, the Right, immigrants and the green card, Harlem, City Hall, the NYPD, the South Bronx, the festive season, and as well those usual suspects; cabbies and the subway. Observations run from the obvious (�It struck me how in New York the population unwittingly leans toward a jewishness as a kind of cultural norm�) to the not so (�It really seemed to be true that in New York you raise your hat to a lady and she responds with the story of her life.�)
Probably not worth sniffing out a signed first edition, but likely worth whatever it�s going for in the cheap bins.
***stars
(An interesting footnote: Brook speaking with New York Mayor of the time, Ed Koch � �There�d been a group of bombings on New Year�s Eve, and I asked the Mayor whether he felt that New York, as the financial centre of the world, was particularly vulnerable to urban terrorism. He looked astonished. �Vulnerable? In england you had 27 people killed by a bomb, blowing up the horses in the park the other day! And in Belfast? More people are killed in Britain than in New York!��)