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by William Butler
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  • Author:
    William Butler
  • ISBN:
    0345023668
  • ISBN13:
    978-0345023667
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Panther; First Paperback Printing edition (1967)
  • Pages:
    221 pages
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1777 kb
  • ePUB format
    1202 kb
  • DJVU format
    1522 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    548
  • Formats:
    mobi azw lrf doc


The Butterfly Revolution is a novel by author William Butler, first published in 1961. Set in an American spring camp for boys, Camp High Pines, the novel is written as the diary of thirteen-year-old protagonist Winston Weyn

The Butterfly Revolution is a novel by author William Butler, first published in 1961. Set in an American spring camp for boys, Camp High Pines, the novel is written as the diary of thirteen-year-old protagonist Winston Weyn. Winston, an educated and somewhat bullish boy, is sent to Camp High Pines as a gift for his birthday

The Butterfly Revolution book. In William Butler’s The Butterfly Revolution, some kids fed up with their summer camp’s strict rules and boring activities decide to have an innocent revolt.

The Butterfly Revolution book. Welcome to High Pines Summer Camp for Boys. But locking away the adults has consequences, with the kids falling under the reign of a persuasive teen dictator who may push their fun-loving revolution one step too far.

Cover art: Marvin Hayes. In his journal, Winston Weyn relates how the boys at his summer camp are drawn into a revolution, headed by a boy who calls himself General Frank. Even those boys who hate power for its own sake are drawn into General Frank's attractive web - as the revolution turns into a nightmare.

First published in 1961,The Butterfly Revolution by William Butler is an excellent book that is now forgotten by most readers. I found the book at my neighborhood thrift store for a quarter and went. You can purchase a used copy of The Butterfly Revolution here. First published in 1961,The Butterfly Revolution by William Butler is an excellent book that is now forgotten by most readers. I found the book at my neighborhood thrift store for a quarter and went in with minimal expectations. I was sucked into the story in an instant, enjoyed the entire book a great deal, and was satisfied with the conclusion.

Used availability for William Butler's The Butterfly Revolution. October 1975 : USA Mass Market Paperback. May 2008 : USA Library Binding.

Butterfly Revolution Teacher’s Guide. Butterfly Revolution Teacher’s Guide. Category: Literary Fiction Suspense & Thriller. Against the backdrop of normal camp activities, author William Butler sows the seeds of the trouble that will break out: the boys in Winston’s cabin resent his behavior as cabin leader, particularly the system of fines he imposes to deal with infractions of the rules (although Winston himself struggles with the problem of reporting other boys who pay an illegal visit to.

The film is based on the novel The Butterfly Revolution by William Butler.

Adult butterflies have large, often brightly coloured wings, and conspicuous, fluttering flight. The film is based on the novel The Butterfly Revolution by William Butler. Scouting in Puerto Rico has a long history, from the 1920s to the present day, serving both boys and girls. Troops, Venturing Crews and Sea Scouting units are part of the Boy Scouts of America, for both boys and girls, or the Girl Scouts of the USA, for girls. Several campsites are owned and maintained by these organizations.

The Butterfly Revolution is a novel written in 1961 by William Butler. Literature, The Butterfly Revolution.

The Butterfly Revolution William Butler Book by William Butler. There is hiking, swimming, canoeing-and a revolution led by General Frank. It's Lord of the Flies (which I loved ) only better. Number of Pages: 224 pages.


Iesha
It had been almost forty years since I read this book back in 1973. "The Butterfly Revolution" was given as an assignment by our 8th-grade teacher. I had absolutely loved the story. Its impact was so that I eagerly jumped at reading "The Butterfly Revolution" again these so many years later. Wow... I didn't recall it being so radical in challenging my Christian, small-town mindset. I can see why some people wanted it banned. If our conservative, religious parents had any idea about the contents of this book, they'd have probably burned our wonderful teacher at the stake. There is an occassional outburst of profanity, but it's pretty tame in comparison to today's mores. Mr. Butler addressed such sensitive topics as patriotism, religious intolerance, jingoism, morality and racism. This highly readable journal written through the eyes of a 13-year-old boy, Winston Weyn, is pure gold for introducing readers to think outside their limited view of the world. The bulk of the story is very male oriented. I'm not sure how well girls will relate to it. Mr. Butler's story probably laid the seeds of my evolution into becoming a critical thinker. I can't thank the teacher or the author enough for the gift they gave me.
Heri
I read this book in High School and was very intrigued by it. Compelling & riveting, I was surprised to learn from my teacher that the book at the time was no longer in print (it was subsequently reprinted).

If you like Lord of the Flies, you'll like this book (and I like this book even better). I didn't enjoy reading in High School, but this is one of the few reading assignments I willingly completed. I'd recommend it for those of Jr High age and above (younger, sensitive readers may be overly alarmed & dismayed at some of the fictional events of the story).

I purchased a used one from Amazon Prime to save a few bucks and was satisfied with the condition. A lot of the pages were dog-eared, but the spine & cover are in fine condition with no ripped pages. The very old copy I used to own fell apart (it was an earlier publishing not obtained from Amazon that had a white cover & butterfly). I'm very happy to have this replacement copy.
Brakora
I love watching Summer Camp Nightmare growing up in the 80s and I had no idea that there was a book which the movie was based around.. so I pick this up later in life in my thirties.. well it's a great read I just finished it tonight
Cerar
As a child, I'll readily admit that I abhorred reading. I avoided every reading assignment in school and couldn't grasp why people held books in such high esteem when movies were quicker and far more entertaining. I was ignorant. All that changed when I found this book decaying at a army housing book swap. This book made me realize that there is a far more intimate interaction that happens by reading a book. A slow dialog between the writer an the reader that allows for a full and satisfying digestion. It whet my appetite and I've been devouring ever since.
The plot is classic youth versus authority and it has a "be careful what you wish for" moral. It also works as a larger political allegory.
I highly recommend this book to book-hating, disaffected youth. If you have one in your life, buy this book and pass it on.
Kann
I read this one as a child. A lot of people mention the parallels between this and Lord of the Flies, but I think they have slightly different themes. Lord of the Flies was about the thin veneer of civilization, especially thin among children. The Butterfly Revolution is about the naivete of youthful politics. The Butterfly Revolution is reminiscent of idealistic communist revolutions that turned into dictatorships. LOTF is about children descending into savagery. TBR is about the childishness of revolutionaries.
Kriau
A co-ed "Lord of the Flies" first person tale. A gift for the dystopian reader.
Zehaffy
Had to read this book in high school and I enjoyed it. Bought for my son who is not an avid reader, and he liked it as well.
The Butterfly Revolution by William Butler is an excellent book that was first released in 1961 and is now forgotten by most readers. I found the book at my neighborhood thrift store for a quarter and went in with minimal expectations. I was sucked into the story in an instant, enjoyed the entire book a great deal, and was satisfied with the conclusion. The book tells the tale of a camper revolt and takeover at High Pines Summer Camp for Boys. The revolution is lead by one of the older campers, Frank Reilly. Reilly is intelligent, manipulative, and power hungry. He knows how to make the younger campers feel safe and appreciated. He understands what level of information he can share with the different age groups at the camp. He assigns different campers roles with specific objectives so they feel valued. As the story moves on, we discover that his master plan includes a much bigger takeover outside of High Pines.

The entire book is told through the journal entries of narrator and 13-year-old camper Winston Weyn. He is a well-read young man who struggles to connect with his peers because of his superior intelligence and fondness for rules and structure. He is a compelling storyteller and Butler succeeds in using the journal entry style as an effective storytelling mechanism without it ever feeling forced or unnatural. We see the events unfold through the eyes of someone who buys into the takeover, feels conflicted about it at various points, and realizes what a terrible idea the revolution is at the end of the book.

It's a well-worn theme, but I thought The Butterfly Revolution did an excellent job showing how large groups of people can be influenced by a charismatic, strong-willed leader. This book also resonated with me because I found the portrayal of Winston so believable. I work with teenagers and I've worked enjoyed working with students like him before. He is not a mean-spirited kid. He doesn't want to harm others. But he also has the normal desires to be liked and accepted and it is easy for the older campers to influence his behavior and thinking. He wants to believe that the world follows a logic and balance that can be learned through reading books. By the end of the book he realizes that some things in life happen without reason or justification.

I also found Mr. Warren, the camp's director, a cringe-inducing but believable adult figure in the book. He represents the out-of-touch adult all teachers/people who work with young adults fear turning into. He forces campers to do activities they have no interest in, becomes angry and upset when his authority is questioned, doesn't seem to have much empathy for the campers, and is disliked or treated with disinterest by most of them. There some scenes with Mr. Warren that made me groan because I've seen his behavior in other adults I've worked with, and, as much as I hate to admit it, acted that way myself on a few occasions.

Reading this book, which I had never heard of before, made me realize how many great books there are from years ago that don't have the audience to justify a reissue or an e-book edition. I hope this post sparks the interest of some Amazon users enough for them to buy this book or find it at their local library.