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by Sue Townsend
Download The True Confessions of Adrian Albert Mole, Margaret Hilda Roberts and Susan Lilian Townsend fb2
  • Author:
    Sue Townsend
  • ISBN:
    0413624501
  • ISBN13:
    978-0413624505
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Methuen Publishing Ltd; First Edition edition (August 31, 1989)
  • Pages:
    112 pages
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1327 kb
  • ePUB format
    1356 kb
  • DJVU format
    1449 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    102
  • Formats:
    azw doc lrf mobi


The True Confessions of Adrian Albert Mole, Margaret Hilda Roberts and Susan Lilian Townsend. Margaret Hilda Roberts. These diary entries were found between the pages of The Be-Ro Cook Book for Girls at a car boot sale in Grantham on a Bank Holiday Monday in 1988.

The True Confessions of Adrian Albert Mole, Margaret Hilda Roberts and Susan Lilian Townsend. Adrian Mole: From Minor to Major. Adrian Mole: The Wilderness Years. Adrian Mole: The Cappuccino Years. Adrian Mole and the Weapons of Mass Destruction. Nothing (unfortunately) is known about Margaret Hilda Roberts or what became of her. The diary is believed to have been written in the 1930. The Secret Diary of Margaret Hilda Roberts Aged 14. Friday May 6th.

Sue Townsend, with The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole Aged 13¾ (1982) and The Growing Pains of Adrian Mole (1984), was Britain’s bestselling . of Adrian Albert Mole, Margaret Hilda Roberts and Susan Lilian Townsend.

Sue Townsend, with The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole Aged 13¾ (1982) and The Growing Pains of Adrian Mole (1984), was Britain’s bestselling author of the 1980s.

The Sue Townsend and Margaret Roberts sections are much shorter than the Mole section - though the .

The Sue Townsend and Margaret Roberts sections are much shorter than the Mole section - though the Sue Townsend section follows a similar format to what has come before. The Margaret Roberts slot, on the other hand, follows the 'traditional' Mole diary format. I had the feeling, as I settled in to reading True Confessions of Adrian Albert Mole, that Sue Townsend had a number of ideas for sequences, but none of them quite fit into a full-length novel.

True Confessions of Adrian Albert Mole, Margaret Hilda Roberts and Susan Lilian Townsend.

Sue Townsend- An Obituary 1946 - 2014. Sue Townsend was one of Britain's most popular, and most loved, writers with over 10 million copies of her books sold in the UK alone. The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole aged 13 3⁄4has sold over 20 million copies worldwide and has become a modern classic. Born in Leicester in 1946, Sue left school at 15 years of age. She married at 18, and by 23 was a single parent with three children. She worked in a variety of jobs including factory worker, shop assistant, and as a youth worker on adventure playgrounds.

Mobile version (beta). True Confessions of Adrian Albert Mole, Margaret Hilda Roberts and Susan Lilian Townsend. Townsend Sue. Download (mobi, 197 Kb). EPUB FB2 PDF TXT RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

of Adrian Albert Mole, Margaret Hilda Roberts and Susan Lilian Townsend. The diary is believed to have been written in the nineteen thirties. Susan Lilian Townsend.

Start by marking True Confessions of Adrian Albert Mole . The book also has diary entries from the author Sue Townsend, and from someone called Margaret Hilda Roberts, which appears This is the 3rd book in the Adrian Mole series, about a hapless teen in the UK in the 80s.

Start by marking True Confessions of Adrian Albert Mole, Margaret Hilda Roberts and Susan Lilian Townsend as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. He writes a series of letters and diaries that are often very funny.

Townsend, Sue. Publication date. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by ttscribe24. hongkong on February 9, 2018. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

The True Confessions of Adrian Albert Mole, Margaret Hilda Roberts and Susan Lilian Townsend is the third book in the Adrian Mole series, written by Sue Townsend. It focuses on the worries and regrets of a teenage (supposed) intellectual. The title is long and often shortened to the more convenient The True Confessions of Adrian Albert Mole but the three names are part of the full title and represent fictional (or otherwise) actual content of the book.

THE TRUE CONFESSIONS OF ADRIAN MOLE is the third in the series to be part of Penguin's Sue Townsend repackaging programme. A chance to sell Sue Townsend to a whole new audience! Adrian Mole has grown up. At least that's what it says on his passport. But living at home, clinging to his threadbare cuddly rabbit 'Pinky', working as a paper pusher for the DoE and pining for the love of his life Pandora has proved to him that adulthood isn't quite what he hoped it would be. Still, intellectual poets can't always have things their own way...

TheFresh
You can't but help love Adrian Mole, as well as Sue Townsend for creating him.
Envias
Always a pleasure to see my friend Adrian Mole again. I've been an avid follower of Mole since the late eighties and these books never get old.
Samutilar
I loved the two first books of this series, but i really havent felt this way about the other ones. i dont know if is me or Adrian who grow up.
fetish
How this can be considered a funny book is quite beyond me. What a letdown! What a waste of money!
BeatHoWin
This addition to the Adrian Mole canon is entirely different from the first two books. This is not a diary, but as Sue Townsend writes in her ‘Author’s Preface’ – ‘This book is a collection of some of the articles and essays I have written over the years.’

There are three parts – A variety of material supposedly by Adrian Mole; four essays by Townsend, and then a fictional diary, ‘The Secret Diary of Margaret Hilda Roberts Aged 141/2 and ‘Correspondence with a Queen in Waiting’ also by ‘Roberts.’

Most of the material shows Townsend’s light satiric touch and some of it in Part Two as well.
Kekinos
The Mole section takes up the bulk of the book and covers a five-year period. It begins in December 1984, when he's 16years old and is studying for his A-Levels. (He's obviously been reasonably successful in his O-Levels and CSEs, then). However, it's a little different in style to the 'The Secret Diary' and 'The Growing Pains' - it's only partly written in diary format, and it also includes a spot of poetry, his talks given on radio and a couple of letters between Adrian and Barry Kent. (Barry is, for a spell, residing at Her Majesty's Pleasure and has now learnt how to read and write. He's now writing some poetry and - unlike the crap Adrian produces - it's actually quite promising. He's even known as Baz the Skinhead Poet in certain circles). Adrian is also still corresponding with his American penpal, Hamish Mancini - at one point, he has ask Hamish for the return of his diaries. While the book sees some big changes in Adrian 's life, some things have remain constant : he still enjoys reading 'The Beano', is still obsessed with the Norwegian Leather Industry and his love for Pandora Braithwaite. (Pandora, on the other hand, is possibly starting to catch herself about Adrian . Where Adrian deludes himself that he's an intellectual, Pandora is academically gifted...so, the pair's post A-Level life might just prove a little strained).

The Sue Townsend and Margaret Roberts sections are much shorter than the Mole section - though the Sue Townsend section follows a similar format to what has come before. There's a diary from a two week holiday in Majorca, a brief report covering a trip to Russia with a group of other writers and a couple of pages on why she likes England. The Margaret Roberts slot, on the other hand, follows the 'traditional' Mole diary format. (While nothing is officially known of what happened to Ms Roberts, it can only be a coincidence that Margaret Thatcher's maiden name was Roberts). Our heroine is obscenely hard working at school and - like her father, a hard working grocer - she frowns upon socialists. (She particularly despises two disgusting working-class oiks called Ginger Shinnock and Roy Batterfree). She doesn't have many friends - only, really, a renegade boyfriend called Cecil Parkhurst - and she frowns upon Edwina Slurry, her main rival at school. (She also has some trouble with a horrible, working class cyclist with shifty eyes called Tebbit). While a fortune teller claims Margaret is going to be most powerful woman in the land, there is also trouble ahead.

I've slightly mixed feelings about this book...more from Adrian Mole is always a good thing, but somehow cramming five years into half a book seems a bit of a waste. I also would have preferred another Adrian Mole diary - the change in style didn't really work so well for me. (The Margaret Roberts diary, on the other hand, I did enjoy a great deal). Strangely, it was Townsend's own section I liked the least, although I'm not entirely sure why...Recommended overall, but not in the same league as the first two Mole books.
Renthadral
Firstly I wanted to clarify for people that might want to know, exactly how this series runs. I have bought and read all the books in the Adrian Mole series and I was dissappointed not to find anywhere to tell me which ones to get. So as a result I have them all.

US Versions
The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole Aged 13 3/4
The Growing Pains of Adrian Mole
Adrian Mole: The Lost Years
Adrian Mole: The Cappuccino Years
Adrian Mole and the Weapons of Mass Destruction

British Versions
The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole Aged 13 3/4
The Growing Pains of Adrian Mole
True Confessions of Adrian Albert Mole
Adrian Mole: From Minor To Major
Adrian Mole: The Wilderness Years
Adrian Mole: The Cappuccino Years
Adrian Mole and the Weapons of Mass Destruction

So, as for the review these books are great. I love the entire series and I just couldn't stop reading them all the way to the end. The one thing I might suggest is to keep in mind that with most series of books the first is always the best, which is probably the case here too, but if you like it and are a fan of Adrian Mole, there is no reason why you wouldn't want to read the rest.

I like the fact that is it written in diary form for easy reading and it is very clever how the story is told from the point of view of Adrian himself but you can see things about his life that he cannot.

Overall an excellent read for all ages from teen to adult.
I had the feeling, as I settled in to reading True Confessions of Adrian Albert Mole, that Sue Townsend had a number of ideas for sequences, but none of them quite fit into a full-length novel. Thus this entry. That's not a complaint, but the book is not entirely Adrian, and Adrian's sequences skip spaces of time.

The book starts just about where the second one left off, and then segues into essays set up as radio broadcasts, permeated with Adrian's trademark self-delusion. Then Sue Townsend offers several pieces based on her own life, the most amusing being about her love of England. The final segment consists of a "newly-discovered" set of diary pages from one Margaret Hilda Roberts. The conceit is that they are undated, but are suspected to be from the early years of WWII. This is the weakest portion of the book, because Margaret is tremendously unlikeable and the writing lacks the humor that infuses Adrian's sequences.