» » Nova Scotia Shaped by the Sea : A Living History

Download Nova Scotia Shaped by the Sea : A Living History fb2

by choyce-lesley
Download Nova Scotia Shaped by the Sea : A Living History fb2
  • Author:
    choyce-lesley
  • ISBN:
    1895900948
  • ISBN13:
    978-1895900941
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Pottersfield Press; New Revised Edition edition (2007)
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1170 kb
  • ePUB format
    1692 kb
  • DJVU format
    1692 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    712
  • Formats:
    rtf mobi docx lit


English News Lesson on Living By The Sea: Living by. .

English News Lesson on Living By The Sea: Living by the sea makes us happier - FREE worksheets, online activities, listening in 7 Levels. Try the same news story at these easier levels: Living By The Sea - Level 0, Living By The Sea - Level 1 or Living By The Sea - Level 2. Sources. Multiple choice quiz.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and .

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. The history of Nova Scotia is an amazing story of a land and people shaped by the waves, the tides, the winds and the wonder of the North Atlantic. Lesley Choyce weaves the legacy of this unique coastal province, piecing together the stories written in the rocks, the wrecks, and the record books of human glory and human error. Lesley Choyce's writing captures the ebb and flow of Nova Scotia seafaring, from its Golden Age of Sail to disasters and crimes at sea. - The Chronicle-Herald (Halifax).

Atlantic Books Today. Lesley Choyce is a novelist and poet living at Lawrencetown Beach, Nova Scotia. He is the author of more than 80 books for adults, teens and children. There is a kind of Zen peacefulness to this cyclical interpretation of history. - The Edmonton Journal. He teaches in the English Department and Transition Year Program at Dalhousie University. He is a year-round surfer and founding member of the 1990s spoken word rock band, The SurfPoets.

Shaped By The Sea. A Living History. Pottersfield Press at Smashwords. Lawrencetown Beach, Nova Scotia, Canada.

The history of Nova Scotia is an amazing story of a land and people shaped by waves and tides, the winds and the wonder of the North Atlantic.

The history of Nova Scotia is an amazing story of a land & people shaped by the waves, tides, winds, & wonder of the North . I left in 1959 and have lived in Montreal,New Jersey and since 1975,in Mississauga,outside Toronto.

The history of Nova Scotia is an amazing story of a land & people shaped by the waves, tides, winds, & wonder of the North Atlantic. The cover of this book immediately caught my attention;particularly the name of the author,Lesley Choyce. It is a surname I'd never come across and certainly not to be associated with Nova Scotia. Both sides of my family were Scottish and Irish immigrants.

This is a bibliography of major works on Nova Scotia. The Government of Nova Scotia University of Toronto Press, 1957, the standard history. Nova Scotia: Shaped by the Sea. A Living History

This is a bibliography of major works on Nova Scotia. Toronto: Penguin Books Canada, 1996. 305 pp. Girard, Philip; Phillips, Jim; and Cahill, Barry, ed. The Supreme Court of Nova Scotia, 1754-2004: From Imperial Bastion to Provincial Oracle U. of Toronto Press 2004.

The history of Nova Scotia is an amazing story of a land and people shaped by the waves, tides, winds, and wonder of the North Atlantic. The first people arrived after the retreat of the glaciers, and over thousands of years the highly civilized Mi'kmaq culture evolved. The arrival of European settlers disrupted their life. Then came the power struggle between France; as England emerged the Victor, the Acadians were driven from the land they loved. The sailors and shipbuilders led the province into a flourishing trade. During WW1, it was again thrust into military activity

Used availability for Lesley Choyce's Nova Scotia Shaped By the Se. January 1996 : USA Hardback.

January 1996 : USA Hardback. October 2007 : Canada.

The history of Nova Scotia is an amazing story of a land & people shaped by the waves, tides, winds, & wonder of the North Atlantic. The first people arrived after the retreat of the glaciers, & over thousands of years the highly civilized Mi'kmaq culture evolved. The arrival of European settlers disrupted their life. Then came the power struggle between France; as England emerged the Victor, the Acadians were driven from the land they loved. The sailors & shipbuilders led the province into a flourishing trade. During WW1, it was again thrust into military activity. At the end of the 20th century, it is unclear whether the way of life along this coast will survive.

MrCat
Well written, insightful and a touch of tongue in cheek here and there. A good read!
Ginaun
The words of Thomas Jefferson are never more appropriate than when applied to Nova Scotia.
I was born in 1935 and grew up in Nova Scotia. I left in 1959 and have lived in Montreal,New Jersey and since 1975 ,in Mississauga,outside Toronto.The cover of this book immediately caught my attention;particularly the name of the author,Lesley Choyce.It is a surname I'd never come across and certainly not to be associated with Nova Scotia.Both sides of my family were Scottish and Irish immigrants who came to Nova Scotia in the late 1700's, mainly to get away from the oppression of the British and and in search of a life where a man's worth came from his own efforts ,not from his position,religion or privilege.
Choyce has written a good book describing the history of Nova Scotia;trying to make sense out of what happened along the way and why things are the way they are today.
He covers the early history where Nova Scotia was nothing more to England and France than land to occupy for its resources or military significance.The people,other than military,were conned in every way possible ,all with only one purpose,spread of empire.
The forms of government,oppression,prejudices,religious descrimination and all the rest of social systems ,that were so bad in Europe were transported and installed here.While governments fought ,the rule and influence moved back and forth with wins and losses.It was the people themselves that were the real losers.The key when looking at the development of Nova Scotia is to remember there was never a Revolution as there was in the United States.Hence, the mentality of being masters of their own destiny has never replaced the reliance on big government ,mother country,King or Crown to direct and control the lives of the people.
Nova Scotia was a British colonly like the other 13 colonies in 1776 when the American Revolution succeeded in driving out the British and creating a country founded on the principles of Life,Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness ,Justice ,their own Constitution,Laws and government. That did not happen with Nova Scotia.As the author correctly shows,Nova Scotia had more in common with the American colonies,but nearly 100 years later in 1867 was virtually forced into union through Confederation.The driving force being the Tory Government and greatly supported by England.Certainly there was no wide support of the people as most of them were, or were descendents of, the French,Scottish and Irish who had known the heavy hand of British rule.There never was a vote by the people ;simply the application of Peace Order and Good Government...
Canada has been existing ,more or less,under this arrangement for 139 years and is probably less united than in 1867. While the central government continues to control,the provinces are forever squabbling and even fanning flames of separation in Quebec,Alberta,BC,and the Maritimes.
The author doesn't really get into it too much;but as you read this book ;keep asking yourself what did the English or the French do that was in Nova Scotia's interest. Then, what has been the result in Nova Scotia of having joined into Confederation.Unfortunately,the mindset is not really there to change the arrangement,but to keep hoping that Government will solve it.
Another thing that the author skips over is that the total population of Nova Scotia has changed little in the last 100 years. The reason is that so many young people have seen the stagnation and simply did what their forefathers from Ireland and Scotland did;its called dispora,they got the hell out of there for greener pastures.
The author has found himself a place there,he loves the landscape ,the people and the culture.Great,and all the more power,success and happinessto him .But remember he works in the secure enviroment of a university,not in the mines,in the fisheries,lumbering ,steel industries or a host of other occupations which have had a continuing history of small successes and crushing disasters.
Another reviewer mentioned that the lack of maps was a problem in following this history;but I kept a highway map handy and had no problem.Another, mentioned visiting Nova Scotia.It is a wonderful place to visit,loads of history,excellent roads and an endless number of spots to discover anywhere along the coast or inland.If the Nova Scotia Tourist Information Bureau is contacted;they will send loads of information to you.
Jay
Lesley Choyce is a novelist, not a historian -- something that shows through in Nova Scotia: Shaped by the Sea. The book is well written and gives a compelling portrait of this corner of Atlantic Canada, but at times the history seems to barely dent the surface.
Arranged in 45 short (usually four- to five-page) chapters, Choyce covers Nova Scotia from the geologic prehistory of the land through European colonization and into the fish wars of the 1990s. Throughout it all he manages to strike a nice balance between veneration of important historical figures and lamentation of the wrongs imposed upon the environment, Native Americans and others.
Although Choyce obviously doesn't love everything that has been done by the people of Nova Scotia over time, he does love the province -- something that shines through in the brief historical vignettes of this book.
Jozrone
While the history covers the full length of Nova Scotia's history, it is very anecdotal in nature. As a result I found it very disjointed. The lack of a map was also keenly felt. Even though Choyce often supports his theme of the great influence of the sea on Nova Scotia, the gaps in the narrative greatly weaken the impact. If you want a series of short excerpts of Nova Scotia's history, I can recommend this book. However, it is not up to giving much insight into the why of the province's history.