» » The Search for Anna Fisher

Download The Search for Anna Fisher fb2

by Florence Fisher
Download The Search for Anna Fisher fb2
  • Author:
    Florence Fisher
  • ISBN:
    0525630015
  • ISBN13:
    978-0525630012
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    A. Fields Books; 1st edition (1973)
  • Pages:
    270 pages
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1689 kb
  • ePUB format
    1733 kb
  • DJVU format
    1623 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    516
  • Formats:
    docx txt lit azw


tight gutters throughout the book.

New York, A. Fields Books. tight gutters throughout the book. Canon EOS 5D Mark II.

More by Florence Fisher.

Florence Fisher began to comb the labyrinths of official birth and death records, newspaper morgues, and created her own genealogy chart of a family she'd never met. Aided only by her ingenuity and persistence, she finally succeeded in assembling the vital parts of the puzzle. The moment when she finally comes face to face with her natural mother is as dramatic as it is heart-clutching. A reunion totally different from the moment, a year later, when she completed the circle and found her father.

You must be logged in to Tag Records.

New York : A. Australian/Harvard Citation.

com's Anna Fischer Page and shop for all Anna Fischer books. Check out pictures, bibliography, and biography of Anna Fischer.

The Reader's Digest Condensed Books were a series of hardcover anthology collections, published by the American general interest monthly family magazine Reader's Digest . Mrs. Starr Lives Alone - Jon Godden.

The Reader's Digest Condensed Books were a series of hardcover anthology collections, published by the American general interest monthly family magazine Reader's Digest and distributed by direct mail. Most volumes contained five (although a considerable minority consisted of three, four, or six) current best-selling novels and nonfiction books which were abridged (or "condensed") specifically for Reader's Digest  .

270 pp. Arthur Fields. The story of an adopted girl obsessed with finding her real parents. Her child hood had been something out of Dickens-a possessive moth er and distant father who re fused to admit that she was adopted.

View the profiles of people named Anna Fisher.

These three books between them nearly cover the whole effective range of British archaeology, from the gropings and fumblings of medieval monks to the era of pollen analysis and radio-carbon.

Mrs. Starr lives alone, by Jon Godden. These three books between them nearly cover the whole effective range of British archaeology, from the gropings and fumblings of medieval monks to the era of pollen analysis and radio-carbon. There is a gap of nearly a century, however, between the death of Stukeley in 1765 and the beginning of Dr Daniel's hundred years. That is the unfortunate but inevitable result of adopting the rigid. yard-stick of a century for measuring what in fact is the growth of living knowledge.

From jacket: The document lay in the bottom of the bureau drawer. Written in longhand was a name: Anna Fisher. "Who is Anna Fisher?" seven-year-old Florence asked her mother. The woman yanked the paper out of her hands and told her never again to mention that name. But the incident haunted the little girl. Who is Anna Fisher? Who is Anna Fisher? So begins the heart-wrenching story of a woman's search for identity. For what Florence had discovered-and it would be years before anyone admitted it-was that though she was raised Florence, she was born Anna. As an infant she had been given up for adoption. Her attempt to raise the curtain, cloaking something to which she felt no one had a greater right-her past, a sense of continuity-exposed her to the censure, indignation, even the fury of those determined to wall off her identity. Over and over she heard: "You have no right to know." No right? What about the right of the adopted child? The search for Anna Fisher, a search that took over twenty years, is like an enormously complex, highly-dramatic detective story. Florence Fisher began to comb the labyrinths of official birth and death records, newspaper morgues, and created her own genealogy chart of a family she'd never met. Aided only by her ingenuity and persistence, she finally succeeded in assembling the vital parts of the puzzle. The moment when she finally comes face to face with her natural mother is as dramatic as it is heart-clutching. A reunion totally different from the moment, a year later, when she completed the circle and found her father. Since that meeting, which changed her life forever, Florence Fisher has been active in helping others in their search. As president and founder of ALMA-Adoptees' Liberty 'Movement Association (P.O. Box 154, Washington Bridge Station, New York 10033) -she has appeared on radio and TV shows, and numerous articles by and about her view on adoption have been published.

Taun
Florence Fisher is an Adult Adoptee, adopted at birth, who searched and found both of her first parents, and who founded the Adoptees' Liberty Movement Association (ALMA Society). ALMA is one of the first Adoptee Rights organizations to fight for the rights of Adult Adoptees to gain legal entitlement to the first chapter of their lives: their life pre-adoption.

Published in the early 1970's, this book is still relevant today. Although time and increased education over the decades has assuaged some of these issues, the misunderstandings, stereotypes, and assumptions Fisher faced are still faced by Adoptee Rights Activists and searching members of the adoption constellation (often called "triad") today. Additionally, only 6 states in the U.S. allow Adult Adoptees the same access to their own factual birth documentation as the non-adopted receive. Adult Adoptees are the ONLY individuals in the United States who cannot see their Original Birth Certificates. The same laws Fisher fought decades ago are still, yes still, being fought by adoptees and their families, loved ones, and allies today.

It is hard not to be drawn into Fisher's story of her devotion to activism and search for her family. She is extremely transparent and honest about her journey and feelings--something the reader grows to know is important to her as part of Fisher's life was held in secret, and she desired no secrets any longer.

This book is an important piece of adoption and Adoptee Rights history.
Dolid
I had read this book about 30 years ago and had lost my copy. It was as compelling as it was the first time I read it. I'm realizing how great it is to order used books. Huge money saver and this company was excellent.
spacebreeze
An amazing, heartbreaking, and heartwarming story! So much of what others take for granted - knowledge of parents, siblings and relatives, feeling connected, and having a sense continuity of blood and heritage - is missing from the life of an adopted child. The reader is quickly caught up in Florence's search for her mother and father, and Florence tells the story directly from her heart.
Pumpit
I finally read this book after years of adoption research and activism. It is still relevant and is a quick and easy read. The book also illustrates how little has changed in some of the entrenched popular and even professional views of adoption as unexceptional.
Gavirgas
This is an extremely interesting book, detailing one woman's search for her birth mother at a time when ALL adoption records were sealed. This gives the story a lot of drama, as Florence must become her own private investigator while unearthing clues about her history over resistance from her adopted family. It's a story of perseverance with a great payoff. The book unfolds like a classic mystery, with the reader becoming as interested as the heroine is in her origins, the circumstances of her adoption, and her birth mother's whereabouts. One also sympathizes a great deal with the writer as she diligently calls government office after office, simply trying to find the name of the woman who gave birth to her. She knows the office employees have the name and file right in front of them, and that her fate is literally in their [disinterested] hands...yet they are precluded by law from sharing information with her. I do take exception to the idea, posted elsewhere, that all parties involved in an adoption need to consent before information is shared. If I gave up a baby some day, I can see how I might not want to discuss it or necessarily made public...but I don't have a right to cut another person, and perhaps their children, off from their family history. Everyone has the right to know who their family was and where they came from. It has a great deal to do with our identity.
Danrad
I read the Reader's Digest Condensed version of this book in their Volume 4 1973 edition. What a service the author provided to adoptees wondering about their birth parents! The book is very well written with the author describing vividly both the physical places and her emotions.
How times have changed! I kept thinking how much time she could have saved in her search if the Internet had been available to her at the time. She was also limited by huge charges for long distance telephone calls at the time. However, she was sometimes able to get information about a person's employment or change of address that would be more limited now.
The author went on to begin an organization to help adoptees in their searches for their birth parents and was therefore able to steer many people in the right direction. One web site I found contained information from an interview with Florence saying her mother had done a complete turn around, but she did not say whether or not she had been able to meet her half siblings.
This is a book that will stay with me for a long time, and I now understand better how adoptees must feel when they have no idea who their birth parents are. Many adoptees have recently turned to DNA tests in the hopes of finding birth relatives. I wish them all the best outcomes.
Arthunter
This was the first book I read about an adoptee searching for "someone who looks like me" and it made me viscerally understand the yearning most adoptees have, despite the most loving adoptive parents and most fulfilling lives. They are always aware that there is someone out there with a truly vested interest in what became of them. This beautifully written addictively readable autobiography of a search made me realize that some form of open adoption is the healthiest adoption for the child and both sets of parents, even if they do not fully accept this at the beginning. Consciously ignoring one of life's basic assumptions, that of knowing the people who led to one's very creation, should never be attained without the full knowledge and consent of ALL parties, and most especially the one who is the focus of the new family.
I loved this book i read it between 10-13 very strong impact on me searched for years for this book found it for a $1 at a local used bookstore!!!