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by Margaret Legum
Download It Doesn't Have to Be Like This: A New Economy for South Africa and the World fb2
  • Author:
    Margaret Legum
  • ISBN:
    1919760377
  • ISBN13:
    978-1919760377
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Ampersand Press (2002)
  • Pages:
    119 pages
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1515 kb
  • ePUB format
    1538 kb
  • DJVU format
    1941 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    488
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Our famous political 'miracle' is in danger of being undermined by our dependence on world economic factors over which we have little or no control," she wrote in her book It Doesn't Have to Be Like This: a New Economy for South Africa and the World (2002). Without her passionate voice, it will be even more difficult for her persuasive ideas to gain a foothold in official circles. But once back home, Margaret became overly protective of South Africa and the ANC government. The Legums lived in the hillside cottage that Margaret had inherited from her mother, above Kalk Bay harbour, outside Cape Town.

Legum was a founder of the South African New Economics Network.

Legum was a founder of the South African New Economics Network She was well known for a 1963 book on the necessity of economic sanctions against South Africa, South Africa: Crisis for the West, which she co-wrote with her husband, Colin. a b Herbstein, Denis (16 November 2007). Retrieved 22 September 2016. Kharsany, Zahira (2 November 2007).

Connected to: South Africa Economics Apartheid. Her book, It Doesn't Have To Be Like This: Global Economics - A New Way Forward (2003), was written based on a series of lectures she gave at the University of Cape Town. Margaret Jean Roberts Legum (8 October 1933, Pretoria, South Africa – 1 November 2007, Cape Town, South Africa) was a South African/ British anti-apartheid activist and social reformer, who specialized in economics. Legum attended Rhodes University and Newnham College where she studied economics. Legum married Colin Legum in 1960 and they moved to London.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for It Doesn't Have to be Like This . The lowest-priced, brand-new, unused, unopened, undamaged item in its original packaging (where packaging is applicable).

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Margaret Jean Roberts Legum (8 October 1933, Pretoria, South Africa – 1 November 2007, Cape Town, South Africa) was a South African/British anti-apartheid activist and social reformer, who specialized in economics

Margaret Jean Roberts Legum (8 October 1933, Pretoria, South Africa – 1 November 2007, Cape Town, South Africa) was a South African/British anti-apartheid activist and social reformer, who specialized in economics.

Margaret Legum's last book, It Doesn't Have To Be Like This, was .

Margaret Legum's last book, It Doesn't Have To Be Like This, was published in 2002. It is based on our dependency on world economic factors over which we have no control". Margaret Legum died in 2007, aged 74, from cancer, survived by her three daughters and grandchildren. Colin Legum - (3 July 1919, Kestell, Orange Free State, South Africa – 8 July 2003) was, along with his wife, Margaret (), an anti apartheid activist and political exile.

Margaret Jean Roberts Legum (8 October 1933, Pretoria, South Africa – 1 November 2007, Cape Town, South Africa) was a. .

Margaret Jean Roberts Legum (8 October 1933, Pretoria, South Africa – 1 November 2007, Cape Town, South Africa) was a South African/British anti-apartheid activist and social reformer, who specialized in economics. Colin and Margaret Legum had three daughters. Widowed in 2003, Margaret Legum's latter days were spent in South Africa, where she campaigned tirelessly for a system of economic organisation that would reduce developing nations' dependence on world markets, writing, ""I am outraged at our appalling poverty in the midst of unbelievable wealth and potential of plenty for everyone.