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by Olga Ilyin
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  • Author:
    Olga Ilyin
  • ISBN:
    0030000785
  • ISBN13:
    978-0030000782
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Holt, Rinehart, and Winston; 1st edition (1984)
  • Pages:
    316 pages
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1905 kb
  • ePUB format
    1709 kb
  • DJVU format
    1897 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    768
  • Formats:
    rtf mbr doc lrf


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Books & Magazines. White Road: A Russian Odyssey, 1919-1923. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Co. & Winst, 1984.

WHITE ROAD" is an enthralling slice of personal history that chronicles the onset of the Russian Revolution, follows the path of retreat of the White army, and involves us in the chaos, disarray, and horrifying difficulties that beset the Whites and establish new lives as exiles abroad. Olga Ilyin was a young bride at the time the Revolution broke out her husband an officer in the White army. Their background recalls the world of Turgenev's novels moved forward into the twentieth century

Items related to White road: A Russian odyssey, 1919-1923. Ilyin, Olga White road: A Russian odyssey, 1919-1923.

Items related to White road: A Russian odyssey, 1919-1923. ISBN 13: 9780030000782.

The White Road : A Russian Odyssey, 1919-1923. WHITE ROAD" is an enthralling slice of personal history that chronicles the onset of the Russian Revolution, follows the path of retreat of the White army, and involves us in the chaos, disarray, and horrifying difficulties that beset the Whites and establish new lives as exiles abroad.

Olga Ilyin was a Russian-born American poet and novelist. Ilyin was born into the Russian nobility in Russia. She went to school in Europe, and returned to Russia as a young adult. Her works were published in Russia and Europe

Olga Ilyin was a Russian-born American poet and novelist. Her works were published in Russia and Europe. Ilyin tried to flee Russia during the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917. She was arrested in Siberia in 1918, but she was eventually able to emigrate to the United States. She settled in San Francisco, California, where she became a novelist.

There are Olga's periodic emotional outbursts: ""But happiness, what is it. .

There are Olga's periodic emotional outbursts: ""But happiness, what is it indeed?. Could it be that such a glow broke through to me now, just because I could lie down and stretch ou.Toggle navigationMENU. The author, now in her 80s, is one of a dwindling band of White Russian ÉmigrÉs with cherished memories of pre-Revolutionary Russia-subject of her 1951 autobiographical novel, Dawn of the Eighth Day-and undimmed belief in Red ""savagery"" and ""the irrefutable rectitude of the White cause.

White Road : A Russian Odyssey, 1919-1923. By (author) Olga Ilyin. Close X. Learn about new offers and get more deals by joining our newsletter.

"WHITE ROAD" is an enthralling slice of personal history that chronicles the onset of the Russian Revolution, follows the path of retreat of the White army, and involves us in the chaos, disarray, and horrifying difficulties that beset the Whites and establish new lives as exiles abroad. Olga Ilyin was a young bride at the time the Revolution broke out her husband an officer in the White army. Their background recalls the world of Turgenev's novels moved forward into the twentieth century. Members of the upper class and the intelligentsia not unaware or undesirous of social change, they were supporters of the Provisional Government. But as Lenin and the Bolshevik forces triumphed whether one was a moderate or a monarchist no longer mattered. This was class war with a vengeance. The Whites had no choice but to flee for their lives-literally-and the story Mrs. Ilyin tells is utterly fascinating and sometimes horrifying. The zigzag journey across Siberia is brought alive in all its hardships and unexpected brief pleasures. WHITE ROAD is altogether a mixture of heroism, fear, and nostalgia recollections. The author is a woman in her eighties of indomitable spirit and innate intelligence and must be one of the last living witnesses to the events she describes so vividly. -from dust jacket flap, 1984

Ishnllador
I have to give this book a five star review because I will always remember it. It does start rather slowly, but once we are introduced to all the characters it picks up speed and excitement. The writing is purely lyrical. This book was written in 1984, and, while reading it, I remembered what is was like to read a book by a truly intelligent and literate author, something I haven't seen for quite awhile. I had to keep reminding myself that English was not her first language. What I most enjoyed about this novel was the spiritual journey the author traveled along during her odyssey. She takes what might be ordinary incidents and illustrates quite clearly why they were important to her and how they enhanced her faith in God and life, not in a preachy way but in an inspired way. The difficulties she encounters seem almost insurmountable, but as she writes, she always seems to be pulled through somehow at the last moment. This is the essence of faith in the midst of sacrifice, violence, and much bloodshed. It gives a grisly picture of the early years of the U.S.S.R, and it also presents a clear picture of everything Russia lost culturally through the Bolsheviks. I had never really considered the artistic history of Russia until I read this book, all the authors and musicians. I purchased this book because of the resounding recommendations in the other reviews, and I would also recommend that you read it. You will learn something and be touched by a woman now long dead.
Mozel
Olga Ilyin was a happy young woman of the Russian gentry when the revolution broke out. Her family is separated, and some are killed in battle or coldly executed by the Bolsheviks. In love with a counter-revolutionary whose forces are gradually beaten eastward into Siberia, she arranges to cross from St. Petersburg, then Moscow, across the Siberian plains, all the way to China. This is the story of her unbelievably hard journey battling the freezing winter and fleeing from the Bolsheviks. Part of her journey is by train, some on foot. All this with an infant son. The suffering, the starving, the loss of life, the hideous violent cruelty of the Bolsheviks comes forth in this true narrative like no history book can deliver. Ilyin (a pen name) and her close friends trudge deadly night by deadly night through the dangerous and killing cold across a gigantic continent, turning back, hiding, and detouring, in order to reach the free city of Harbin in China.

This narrative started slowly for me. Ilyin at first seemed complacent about her very comfortable social and financial status, and she could not carry off the glamor and pure gorgeousness of Russian society as Tolstoy and Pasternak could. But once her odyssey began, her writing, which had to have imprinted on her mind in vivid and indelible memory, pulled her reader with her into the horror of the Russian people. All suffered: upper class, middle class, those already in poverty, and peasants in the outlying areas. The war reached them all. They all suffered unspeakably. The Bolsheviks were indiscriminately harsh and cruel. Ilyin makes this horrible time more vivid than any other book I have read on the subject.
There are deeply personal relationships in this story, and there is hope, love, and triumph, but not at the expense of the stark and unspeakable circumstances these people live through (times millions in history). No sentimentality or romanticism here. Yet--as in all stories of the inhumanity of man to man, there is still found the greatest compassion, loyalty, and courage. The writer and some of those she loves are successful in their escape. And with her new husband, for whom she crossed Siberia, she eventually immigrates to the United States. Well worth the read. Engrossing, horrifying, and triumphant all at the same time.
Hurus
Sad story of Russia being destroyed by the Bolsheviks financed by Wall Street .
Iriar
well written. A great insight as to what was happening in Russia at the start of the Revolution.
deadly claw
I consider the day I found this book in a used book store as perhaps the luckiest "book finding" day of my life. Written in almost lyrical prose, this is a heart stopping, gut wrenching, life-affirming adventure in real life. If you think you understand what the Russian people went through during and after the Bolshevik revolution, you don't. This is history written firsthand; enduring love for country, fellow man, and most of all husband and child; this is heroism, and triumph over appalling fear; and most of all, a story of enduring and unquenchable spirit.