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Download The Art of Splitting Stone: Early Rock Quarrying Methods in Pre-industrial New England 1630-1825 fb2

by Mary Gage
Download The Art of Splitting Stone: Early Rock Quarrying Methods in Pre-industrial New England 1630-1825 fb2
  • Author:
    Mary Gage
  • ISBN:
    0971791023
  • ISBN13:
    978-0971791022
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Powwow River Books; 2nd edition (2005)
  • Pages:
    88 pages
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1154 kb
  • ePUB format
    1969 kb
  • DJVU format
    1936 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    875
  • Formats:
    docx rtf lit lrf


FREE shipping on qualifying offers.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. The Art of Splitting Stone is a detailed study of the history, tools, and methods used to split, hoist. It is an invaluable resource for historians, archaeologists, and stone masons interested in identifying, dating, or experimenting with early stone splitting and quarrying methods.

The book shows every tool and covers every imaginable technique for quarrying, splitting, finishing, hoisting . For anyone interested in the history of stone cutting or splitting, this is about the only book providing 200 years of its history.

The book shows every tool and covers every imaginable technique for quarrying, splitting, finishing, hoisting or transporting stone prior to the advent of railroads and steam power. Great for scholars and amateurs alike.

Start by marking The Art of Splitting Stone: Early . Many illustrations and footnotes.

It is an invaluable resource for historians, archaeologists, and stone masons interested in identifying, dating, or experimenting with early stone splitting and quarrying methods.

A total of 11 different stone splitting methods are documented in New England for the time period. Some were transferred from Europe, while others were developed here. All are discussed in the book, which includes illustrations. Powwow River Books, 163 Kimball Road, Amesbury, MA 01913-5515.

Powwow River Books, AmesburyGoogle Scholar. Goedicke H (1964) Some remarks on stone quarrying in the Egyptian Middle Kingdom (2060–1786 . J Am Res Cent Egypt 3:43–50Google Scholar. Gómez-Heras M, Smith BJ, Fort R (2006) Surface temperature differences between minerals in crystalline rocks: implications for granular disaggregation of granites through thermal fatigue. Geomorphology 78:236–249CrossRefGoogle Scholar.

book by Mary E. Gage. Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover.

Fire has long been recognized as an agent of rock weathering. Our understanding of the impact of fire on stone comes either from early anecdotal evidence, or from more recent laboratory simulation studies, using furnaces to simulate the effects of fire.

Amesbury: Powwow River Books. Delmar’s standard book of electricity (3rd e. United States: Thomson Learning, Inc. Hewitt, P. G. (2002). Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Prentice Hall. Standards for technological literacy.

or experimenting with early stone splitting and quarrying methods

It is an invaluable resource for historians, archaeologists, and stone masons interested in identifying, dating, or experimenting with early stone splitting and quarrying methods.

"The Art of Splitting Stone" is a detailed study of the history, tools, and methods used to split, hoist, and transport quarried stone in pre-industrial New England (1630-1825). It is an invaluable resource for historians, archaeologists, and stone masons interested in identifying, dating, or experimenting with early stone splitting and quarrying methods. The amateur researcher and avid outdoors person will find the book useful as a field guide to identifying split boulders and stone quarries abandoned in the woods.

Qus
I am researching a book, and I was looking for some information on building bridges in the late 18th and 19th centuries. This book gives enough detail to the technique
of stone masonry that its principles can be applied to building structures in the U.S. in the 1700-1800s. A personal reference once told me that early America looked like
Europe back then due to the stone masons that immigrated to the U.S. This book gives easy to understand methods of the basic principles of early construction. Alas, most of this
construction was gone in this country by the early 1900s, but here is a source to see how some of it was accomplished.
Mmsa
Reading and enjoying it. Appreciate the history. I recommend anyone to buy this if you are interested in how it was done and can be done
Xtreem
This details how the job was done before all of those million dollar tools. Great book for someone learning to do the job in a simple way.
Coidor
Gift
Karg
Well researched and beautifully presented, just what I was looking for.
Unnis
great book in good condition
Coiwield
As a mason and a rock lover I've always wanted to know how it was done back in the day when there were no jackhammers, power drills or cranes. I also spend a lot of time in the woods and this book is a great way to help date some of those old rocks and crumbling stone foundations in the abandoned and overgrown farms and fields of New England. A great companion to Wessels "Reading the Forested Landscape". Indepth research and detailed illustrations give the how, when and why different techniques were utilized and developed with time and technology. The reprinted illustrations date from the 17th through the 19th centuries and really show what a few well leveraged poles and pulleys can move. The book shows every tool and covers every imaginable technique for quarrying, splitting, finishing, hoisting or transporting stone prior to the advent of railroads and steam power. Definitely a one of a kind book due to the limited research on the topic. Great for scholars and amateurs alike.
For anyone interested in the history of stone cutting or splitting, this is about the only book providing 200 years of its history. In many portions of the book, the authors reference other sources of information with the comment that it provides great detail of the process, but the authors fail to provide the detail. Therefore, if you do need details on technique, you still must try to find the older referenced source, leaving a lot of research to the reader. Overall, it is a good source of cutting techniques and provides enough information to allow the reader to experiment with the various techniques.