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by Chris Pierson
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  • Author:
    Chris Pierson
  • ISBN:
    0786926767
  • ISBN13:
    978-0786926763
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Wizards of the Coast (November 5, 2001)
  • Pages:
    344 pages
  • FB2 format
    1737 kb
  • ePUB format
    1807 kb
  • DJVU format
    1403 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    962
  • Formats:
    mbr lrf rtf txt


The Dragonlance short story collections are mainly divided into the two publishing lines Tales and Dragons Anthologies. Chosen of the Gods (November 2001), by Chris Pierson

The Dragonlance short story collections are mainly divided into the two publishing lines Tales and Dragons Anthologies. With most recent collections the dividing line has been somewhat erased. Chosen of the Gods (November 2001), by Chris Pierson

Chosen of the Gods book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Chosen of the Gods (Dragonlance: Kingpriest, as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Chosen of the Gods book.

Its marketplace bustled with noise and laughter and a riot of trade riches: spices and satin, wine and pearls, brightly hued songbirds and the skulls of long-dead dragons

Chapter One. Chapter Two. Chapter Three. Its marketplace bustled with noise and laughter and a riot of trade riches: spices and satin, wine and pearls, brightly hued songbirds and the skulls of long-dead dragons. Even in such a marvelous city, some wonders stood out. In the western quarter was the School of the Games, a vast arena draped in banners of silk, where gladiators had once fought and died and mummers now played out tales of wars long won, kingdoms long since conquered.

Chris Pierson has written numerous short stories set in the world of Krynn, as well as the Dragonlance novels Spirit of the Wind, Dezra's Quest, and Chosen of the Gods, the first volume in the Kingpriest trilogy. Pierson lives in Massachusetts. Series: Kingpriest Trilogy (Book 1). Mass Market Paperback: 320 pages. Publisher: Wizards of the Coast (November 2001).

Part of the Dragonlance Universe Series and Dragonlance: Kingpriest ( Series). After the Kingpriest fortells his own death, dark forces converge on the Temple and a priestess of the god Paladine enters on a quest to find the Lightbringer, chosen by the gods to bring light to battle the coming darkness.

Dragonlance:Kingpriest, Kingpriest . Paladine, the supreme god of Good, loomed above the others, a long-bearded warrior in armor shaped like dragon-scales.

Dragonlance:Kingpriest, Kingpriest /. Pierson . книга Chosen of the Gods. Eleventhmonth, 922 IA. The Lordcity of Istar was the center of the world around which A all else revolved. Kurnos genuflected to the idol, kissing the platinum medallion that hung at his throat then pressing it to the god’s glistening feet. A door opened as he knelt there, and an old, bald cleric in a white cassock emerged. Kurnos recognized the man: Brother Purvis, the Kingpriest’s chamberlain.

Chosen of the Gods Pierson, Chris Random House (USA) 9780786919024 : After the Kingpriest fortells his own death, dark forces converge on the Temple and a. .Chosen of the Gods, Pierson, Chris. Варианты приобретения.

Chosen of the Gods Pierson, Chris Random House (USA) 9780786919024 : After the Kingpriest fortells his own death, dark forces converge on the Temple and a priestess of the god Paladine enters o.

ELEVENTHMONTH, 922 IA. Half a million souls-more than mighty Palanthas and Tarsis to the west combined-dwelt within that embrace.


lubov
Chris Pierson is a masterful writer. I have no issues or complaints with his writing. It’s smooth and easily apprehended by anyone who loves books and enjoys learning. That said, the novel is not without its flaws. Although they aren’t numerous, the are quite conspicuous and end up making the experience less epic than it otherwise could have been.

I’ll start by pointing out its status as the first tome in a 3-part trilogy. As such, there will be a considerable amount of foreshadowing and scene-setting to be explored and delved into late in the series. I don’t count this against the book or the author, as I started reading this book knowing what I was getting into in this regard. The plot of the first book is complete though simple at its core (a corrupt usurper acquires the mantle of Kingpriest, gaining unquestioning control over a sprawling empire. The more he struggles to keep things balanced, the more plates he has to keep spinning, and the outcome isn’t surprising). The characters aren’t very well developed, but that’s understandable in a novel meant to be viewed and enjoyed from a historical perspective. In a very real sense, the different factions and provinces are characters in their own right, and it is easier to differentiate people and places based on the events that surround them than to attempt a rote-memorisation struggle.

The second flaw that stands out is the use of the church tongue. Like Tolkien’s Elvish, it gets in the way of the story, and forces the reader to either slow down or skim ahead (I did the latter). Although this does not ruin things overall, it does slow down the journey, especially when the characters are talking in two languages at the same time. It's superfluous in most cases and does end up to be an irritant overall.

The descriptions of the cities and characters I found particularly well-done. The reader does not encounter massive walls of text to describe a patch of grass or small hovel, as Tolkien fans are no doubt familiar with. Pierson reveals just enough to allow readers to get an adequate idea of the setting and location, while still allowing them to fill in the blanks and utilise their imagination. The likely events of the latter two books do appear to be foreshadowed, although the veil is quite opaque and you won't notice it unless you're looking for them (or you always parse through your novels as though you were aspiring to be Sherlock Holmes).
Swiang
Finally a book about one of the most hated men on the face of Krynn, The Kingpriest. He is mentioned thru out many DL books about how HE was the one who brought on the fall of the greatest city on Krynn, Istar. How HE demanded too much of Paladine and brought on the Cataclysm. Being this is book 1, you are reading about the rise of a new Kingpriest and a great evil coming to power. There are others who make an appearance in the book who are also well known in future DL books. The reading is good and allows you to see a person greed get the better of him. If your a DL fan you will like this book.
cyrexoff
Great trilogy
Vudomuro
I have read a great many Dragonlance novels, and I've never felt the need to write a review for any of them. The reason for this depends on the books: the Weis/Hickman books need no review because the books speak for themselves; as for the others, most are neither amazing nor terrible, and even the mediocre ones are still enjoyable enough because they are afterall still Dragonlance. This trilogy is different.

To begin with, I've come to expect a certain amount of superfluity and a general disappointment in those novels whose endings are already known; this was the case, of course, with Lord Soth and virtually all of the Preludes sextet. The fact that Peirson manages to hold the reader's interest and give us an ending worthy of the Dragonlance name despite the subject matter was, to me, an amazing feat. These novels were probably the only DL books not writtten by Weis and/or Hickman that really moved me (there were parts that brought me to tears).

Secondly, I tend to be a stickler for detail when it comes to series fantasy. Don't get me wrong- I don't care so much about the minor details, like the location of Raistlin's school (different whether you read the Meetings sextet or the Raistlin chronicles, and for that matter, are we to believe Margaret Weis or the author of the earlier book?)- and at any rate, I view these contradictions as a normal occurence I would encounter if I were traveling across Krynn: the details of the same tale would be different hearing it from a citizen of Palanthas than from a peasant from Lemish, of for that matter from a Silvanesti elf or a kender. But the major details should agree: there should be no vallenwoods in Solamnia, 'Missing City' should not be on the mainland if there is in fact a city there at all, etc. Pierson took a great deal of care in researching the facts for his novels. I even cross-referenced with the Legends trilogy and could not find the slightest problem. Superbly done.
Yanthyr
Dragonlance has some huge hits and misses with their peripheral books that branch off and build on the myth of the original 1st Story Level of Dragonlance. But I'd have to say this is a huge miss, which is surprising, because Chris Pierson's other books Spirit of the Wind and Dezra's Quest, were pretty good.
This book, however, is moribund in pretty much every way. It's not that it's *spectacularly* bad, it's just that it's so rote, so paint-by-numbers, that 80% of the people reading this review could have written a better account. For some reason, a lot of Istar-era Dragonlance books seem to flop (like The Dark Queen, one of the worst Dragonlance books, for example).
This book took place during a fascinating time, and chronicled the rise of the last Kingpriest during a tumultous era. But the book isn't exciting at all. It has no spark, no energy. I like to get a sense of wonder and excitement when reading fantasy. Not to be cruel, but this is like reading a bicycle assembly manual. It's not horrible, it's just bland and dull, and evokes nothing from the reader. With all the other great books out there to read, I would avoid this one.