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by Juliet E Mckenna
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  • Author:
    Juliet E Mckenna
  • ISBN:
    0356220931
  • ISBN13:
    978-0356220932
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Orbit (August 3, 2000)
  • FB2 format
    1265 kb
  • ePUB format
    1689 kb
  • DJVU format
    1356 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    180
  • Formats:
    doc lit azw mobi


Gambler’s Fortune An Imprint of ers This is a work of fiction.

Gambler’s Fortune An Imprint of ers This is a work of fiction. Names, characters, places, and incidents are products of the author’s imagination or are used fictitiously. For information address Eos, an Imprint of HarperCollins Publishers. First Eos paperback printing: August 2001.

demanded Jeirran, astonished. Keisyl squinted into the sun. Carts, lowlanders, smok. .A sound of hammering echoed around the smooth slopes of the valley. How dare they! reement. Eirys bent down from her rough-coated gray pony. Don’t let’s get involved, she pleaded. Let’s get to the fess. They’ll be sorting it out, won’t they? If they’ve any mettle in their bones. Doubt shaded Jeirran’s words. Keisyl pulled on the bridle of the pack mule he led. It followed him placidly, a string of others coming on behind.

Читать онлайн - McKenna Juliet .The Gambler's Fortune Электронная библиотека e-libra. ru Читать онлайн The Gambler's Fortune. The Gambler’s Fortune The Third Tale of Einarinn Juliet E. McKenna One Songs of the Common People Being gathered on travels throughout the Tormalin Empire in the reigns of Castan the Gracious and Nemith the Wily, by Maitresse Dyesse Den Parisot The House of Den Parisot has dwelt in the Nyme Valley since the days of the earliest Emperors.

Books related to The Gambler's Fortune. More by Juliet E. McKenna.

And since those of us who live the traveling life, masqueraders, confidence men, and gamblers, nearly always pitch up at the same big festivals, I reckoned I could put a decently minted silver penny on my chances of getting word of Sorgrad at very least.

The Gambler’s Fortune is Juliet Mckenna’s testing ground for developing strong characters from the enemy lines, such as a disillusioned highlander with high hopes, a beautiful woman craving for knowledge and happiness, as well as an unscrupulous and crafty Elietimm

The Gambler’s Fortune is Juliet Mckenna’s testing ground for developing strong characters from the enemy lines, such as a disillusioned highlander with high hopes, a beautiful woman craving for knowledge and happiness, as well as an unscrupulous and crafty Elietimm. Furthermore, the author delves more deeply into the magic system of artifice with some excellent description of intense battles.

The Gambler's Fortune : The Third Tale of Einarinn. Other books in this series. The Gambler's Fortune. By (author) Juliet E McKenna.

The Gambler’s Fortune The Third Tale of Einarinn Juliet E. McKenna One Songs of the Common People Being gathered on travels throughout the Tormalin Empire in the reigns of Castan the Gracious and Nemith the Wily. The Gambler’s Fortune. The Third Tale of Einarinn. One. Songs of the Common People.


Wenaiand
Bought this book for someone that loves this series. I was so pleased to find it and the others in the series all in one place and at such a great price!
catterpillar
Great story, different than others in its genre.
Light out of Fildon
I've gotten into this series. There are a number of interesting characters and an ongoing threat of danger
Kulasius
Get the whole set of books, you will not be able to put them down. I have my whole family reading them.
Yainai
With each new installment, McKenna's reason for subtitling her series as "tales of Einarinn" becomes increasingly evident: the world itself shares center stage with events and characters. There's ample action in The Gambler's Fortune, but like its predecessors it's best appreciated by readers whose taste for adventure includes a hunger to explore new places and cultures in addition to a thirst for intrepid exploits.
Livak has returned as first-person narrator, like a welcome breath of fresh air. She seems much more natural than currently-absent associate and lover Ryshad. Maybe that's the nature of her personality, or maybe a female point of view just comes more naturally to McKenna. Livak's storyline is intercut with three others told in third-person: an in-depth view of life among the Mountain Men, or Anyatimm, as they call themselves; the most revealing look to-date at the elusive Elietimm; and glimpses of Archmage Planir's ongoing machinations back in Hadrumal.
Livak has entered the pay of Messire D'Olbriot, Ryshad's patron prince, who continues to pool resources with Planir against the Elietimm. One thing they've learned is that the ancient magic now being called "Artifice" is deeply rooted in the oldest races still living on Einarinn. Livak has convinced D'Olbriot to send her on a fact-finding mission among two of those reclusive groups, with wizard Usara along to represent Planir. Figuring her mixed blood will gain entrée among the Forest Folk, she recruits a pair of old friends, brothers Sorgrad and Sorgren, to help with the Mountain Men. She's angling for a discovery big enough to net a fortune in bonus money from D'Olbriot and Planir. Incidentally, she expects her quest to take her well away from further confrontation with the Elietimm, but there she's proven abysmally wrong. In fact, while the most obvious "gambler's fortune" here is Livak's hoped-for bonus, the book's title applies equally well to her changing fortunes on the road.
The time among the Forest Folk is interesting, productive, and not without its tense moments, but the Mountain Men really drive The Gambler's Fortune. Livak has remarked in previous books on the strong resemblance between the Elietimm and her friends Sorgrad and Sorgren. The storylines here tie both peoples firmly together. Through the Anyatimm, McKenna also tells a tale with echoes common to aboriginal peoples of any time or place: heedlessly overrun and gradually supplanted by empire-building outsiders. She declines to let the blame be entirely one-sided, however; if the Anyatimm are indeed doomed, it's due as much to their own tradition-bound inflexibility as to outside influences.
As always, McKenna's writing is rich and colorful. Her characters continue to evolve. She's settled into a measured pace rather slower than some readers might prefer, but there's plenty to see along the way between crises. The incidence of minor basic writing glitches has increased slightly since McKenna's first book, but that's fairly common and not particularly noticeable here. The Gambler's Fortune leaves readers with much to think about and even more to look forward to.
Katius
I just finished this book, which I devoured very quickly, since all of Juliet McKenna's books cannot be put down.
The story now returns to Livak, the spunky female thief from the first book in the series. The Livak-Ryshad romance is put by the wayside, as they go their separate ways. One can only hope that we will see their relationship to fruition in future books.
Livak is again on a quest to find out more about aetheric magic, the new magic that we have been learning about since the very first book. The hope is that they will be able to use the magic against the Elietimm threat. However, Livak's simple goal is to make enough cash on this job so that she can settle down with Ryshad. I've always praised this series' character goals, which always seem realistic, not always altruistic. Some charming new characters are introduced - Sorgren and Sorgrad. In addition, there are some new "villains" on the scene. As usual, they are fleshed out so that we understand their motivations and we can almost sympathise with them.
The third book doesn't seem to conclude the story, although all of McKenna's books feel complete at the end. And so far, the characters and stories are staying fresh - something I cannot say of other writers who continue with the same characters and world for several books.
As usual, I am eagerly awaiting the next one. You may enjoy this book and series if you have enjoyed the work of Terry Goodkind or Robin Hobb.
Anarahuginn
I wasn't going to write a review but the first one on this page was so awful I felt I had to put in my two cents. I have really been enjoying this series and the third entry is no exception. I am very picky about writing and read different books for different reasons. I don't read this type of sf/f looking for inspiring literature- I read it for a rousing story and fun charactors. McKenna's series is just that: a lot of fun to read. I really enjoy her use of differing perspectives. At one point in the third volume, we actually switch to the villain's point of view during the last hours of his life, before his comeuppance. I anticipate that the fourth book will be back to Ryshad's viewpoint, dealing with his activities while offstage during this third book. I agree with an earlier reviewer that I prefer Livak's viewpoint, mainly because she is such a strong and interesting charactor. One of the enjoyable aspects of the third book is the chance to get to know her better as well as the chance to meet her friends Sorgrad and Sorgren and the mage Usara.
If you like a good, well written tale with practical, earthy charactors and a very detailed and believable world of magic and the mundane, you will enjoy this series. If you're looking for Guy Gavriel Kay, go elsewhere.