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by Kenneth R Clew
Download The Somersetshire Coal Canal and railways, (Inland waterways histories) fb2
  • Author:
    Kenneth R Clew
  • ISBN:
    0678056609
  • ISBN13:
    978-0678056608
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    A. M. Kelley (1970)
  • Language:
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    1202 kb
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    4.4
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Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Somersetshire Coal Canal and Railways by Kenneth R. .Place of Publication. Inland Waterways History S. Subject. Unclassifiable: No Bic.

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Canals and inland waterways, natural or artificial waterways used for navigation, crop irrigation, water supply, or drainage. Despite modern technological advances in air and ground transportation, inland waterways continue to fill a vital role and, in many areas, to grow substantially. Canal along a street in Colmar, France. The Oudegracht (Old Canal), Utrecht, The Netherlands.

The Somersetshire Coal Canal was originally a very profitable canal . It was finally abandoned in 1904 when it was sold to The Great Western Railway.

The Somersetshire Coal Canal was originally a very profitable canal, providing a means of transport for the coal from the Somerset mines, and feeding traffic to the Kennet & Avon and Wilts & Berks canals. Only a very small portion of it now remains in water, at its junction with the Kennet & Avon Canal, where it is used as private moorings. The SCC is a narrow canal and we were shown pictures of the once broad lock at Dundas (junction with the K&A Canal) that was later narrowed to prevent wide boats from the K&A taking the trade.

Aqueduct on the Somerset Coal Canal at Dunkerton. a b "History of Somerset Coal Canal". Clew, Kenneth R (1970). The Somersetshire Coal Canal and Railways. The first railway to affect the canal was the Bristol and North Somerset Railway's Frome to Radstock line completed in 1854 which took traffic away from the tramway. It finally closed in 1874 with the Somerset and Dorset Railway's extension to Bath, built along its route from Radstock to Midford. Jim Shead's Waterways Information. Archived from the original on 20 February 2012. Retrieved 9 October 2006.

Book Description David & Charles, 1971. This is an ex-library book and may have the usual library/used-book markings inside. This book has hardback covers. In fair condition, suitable as a study copy.

Library descriptions. No library descriptions found. LibraryThing members' description.

The Somerset Coal Canal (originally known as the Somersetshire Coal Canal) was a narrow canal in England, built . Clew, Kenneth R. (1970). Archived from the original on 20 February 2012

The Somerset Coal Canal (originally known as the Somersetshire Coal Canal) was a narrow canal in England, built around 1800 starting in basins at Paulton and Timsbury to nearby Camerton, over two aqueducts at Dunkerton, through a tunnel at Combe Hay, then via Midford and Monkton Combe to Limpley Stoke where it joined the Kennet and Avon Canal. Newton Abbot: David and Charles.

As the railways overtook the inland waterways in the transportation of coal, the canal’s final cargo was .

As the railways overtook the inland waterways in the transportation of coal, the canal’s final cargo was raw sugar from Liverpool, which was carried to the Sankey Sugar Works at Earlestown. The sugar trade ceased in 1959 and the last navigable section of the canal closed in 1963. The canal soon fell into disrepair, with a drainage scheme removing an entire section. Sutton Stop was celebrated in a book called A Canal People by Robert Longden, and is still seen by many as a window into the history of those who lived and worked on Britain’s canal boats. Visit ww. analjunction.

April 25, 2011 History. Inland waterways histories. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove The Somersetshire Coal Canal and railways from your list? The Somersetshire Coal Canal and railways. Published 1970 by A. M. Kelley in New York.