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by Sarah Challis
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  • Author:
    Sarah Challis
  • ISBN:
    0755356810
  • ISBN13:
    978-0755356812
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Headline Review (January 3, 2013)
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1750 kb
  • ePUB format
    1797 kb
  • DJVU format
    1502 kb
  • Rating:
    4.9
  • Votes:
    390
  • Formats:
    lit docx doc lrf


The Lonely Desert book. Sarah Challis, whose father is the distinguished cinematographer, Christopher Challis, travelled widely with film units as a child

The Lonely Desert book. Sarah Challis, whose father is the distinguished cinematographer, Christopher Challis, travelled widely with film units as a child. She has since lived in Scotland and California but is now happily settled in a Dorset village with three rescued dogs and three chickens. She is married with four sons. Books by Sarah Challis. Mor. rivia About The Lonely Desert.

Select Format: Hardcover. ISBN13: 9780755356799.

Clemmie stayed behind to begin a new life in the Mali desert, but now Emily fears for her cousin's safety. Returning to Africa with her new husband and two friends, she is determined to find out why Clemmie seems so desperately to need her help. Divinity is travelling to Mali to satisfy her curiosity about the land her father came from, and to source new materials for her design company.

ISBN: 978-0-755-35681-2; Издательство: Hodder & Stoughton. Emily and Clemmie's lives changed for ever when they took their great aunt's ashes to rest in a strange and exotic land. Clemmie stayed behind to begin a new life in the Mali desert, but now Emily fears for her cousin's safety. Похожие книги: ASH, SARAH. The Divine Origin of Christianity, Essay.

com's Sarah Challis Page and shop for all Sarah Challis books. Check out pictures, bibliography, and biography of Sarah Challis.

Title : The Lonely Desert. Product Category : Books. Sarah Challis has lived in Scotland and California. She now lives in a Dorset village and is married with four sons. There is no-one in the office at the Weekend. List Price (MSRP) : . 9. Condition : New. Read full description. Country of Publication.

Written by Sarah Challis, Audiobook narrated by Deryn Edwards. Emily and Clemmie's lives changed forever when they took their great aunt's ashes to rest in a strange and exotic land.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Sarah Challis books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. Showing 1 to 30 of 72 results. Most popular Price, low to high Price, high to low Publication date, old to new Publication date, new to old. 1. 2. 3. 35% off.

Sarah Jio weaves past and present in this eminently readable novel about love, gratitude, and forgiveness. ABOUT THE BOOK: Born during a Christmas blizzard, Jane Williams receives a rare gift: the ability to literally see true love. Jane has emerged from an ailing childhood a lonely, hopeless romantic when, on her twenty-ninth birthday, she receives a card from a mysterious woman. Jane must identify the six types of love before sunset on her thirtieth birthday, or face grave consequences. When Jane falls for a science writer who doesn’t believe in love, she fears that her fate is sealed.

Divinity, a designer, is also travelling to Mali to explore the lands of her father, and to source new designs for her business. The three women meet with chaos and adventure in the Mali desert. No current Talk conversations about this book.

Sometimes, the end of a journey is just the beginning...Emily and Clemmie's lives changed for ever when they took their great aunt's ashes to rest in a strange and exotic land. Clemmie stayed behind to begin a new life in the Mali desert, but now Emily fears for her cousin's safety. Returning to Africa with her new husband and two friends, she is determined to find out why Clemmie seems so desperately to need her help. Divinity is travelling to Mali to satisfy her curiosity about the land her father came from, and to source new materials for her design company. She doesn't expect the chaos and adventure she finds - nor the danger that seems to grow as her little group begin to make its way across the desert towards Clemmie...

Zeus Wooden
I honestly find Sarah Challis a bit hit and miss, and although I loved the first book in this series Footsteps in the Sand, I wasn't taken with this one. It doesn't have the spark that Footsteps has, and the characters seem wooden and definitely not as energised as in the first book. I thought it came across as a bit of an afterthought - 'oh, I should follow up on these girls and write about what happens to them', and they all got bogged down (metaphorically) in the desert. I was disappointed with this as a sequel, and the ending was left hanging - so you didn't really know what happened in the end anyway.
Sagda
I enjoy this author
Foiuost
Emily, Hugh, Divinity and Will travel to Mali, West Africa. All four have different agendas: Hugh, an anthropologist, wants to do some field work with the Dogon people; Divinity seeks to source wonderful fabrics for her design business; Will is researching a documentary about the rise of Islamic schools and intends to visit some madrasas; and Emily is on a mission to discover what has happened to Clemmie, her best friend. The latter, on a previous visit to Mali, took up with a Tuareg tribesman and elected to stay there and throw herself into nomadic life. Yes, really!

From their arrival in Mali, the story moves at a rattling pace and is just interesting enough to keep the reader’s attention as the four get themselves into some pretty hairy predicaments and discover that Clemmie is, indeed, in a very sticky situation. No surprises there. To be honest, the storyline is probably the best thing about this novel, even though it stretches credibility to its limit and the ending is pure fairytale. Call me an old cynic, if you will, but are we really being asked to accept that a young woman with everything going for her is going to cast in her lot with a camel riding nomad who is going to abandon her for weeks on end and leave her to sweep sand and chase flies with the other tribeswomen who don’t welcome her and with whom she doesn’t even share a common language? That’s without even mentioning the nefarious business her husband, Chamba, and his brother are involved in or the ever-present threat of Islamic terrorists behind every sand dune.

The novel has three different narrators – Emily, Clemmie and Divinity and unfortunately Challis doesn’t differentiate the first two sufficiently. Both of them, most of the time, sound like something out of a romantic novel from a hundred years ago. “At midday on a bright, chilly Saturday in April, I tucked my cold and trembling hand through the crook of my father’s arm and prepared to walk down the aisle of the little grey stone church …” – Emily describing her marriage to Hugh. Or, Clemmie, “There is so much I didn’t understand that went on between the men of the family, and Chamba never told me. He said there was no need for me to know.” And then, as if she has just remembered that she’s writing a novel set in the twenty first century, Challis bungs in the odd colloquialism which jars unpleasantly, like Clemmie speculating that she might be suspected of “grassing” on her husband.

The third narrator, Divinity, thankfully, is refreshingly unpleasant and her speech is securely grounded in the present day. She’s also no shrinking Victorian heroine and takes a dim view of Clemmie’s “wafting about the desert with some sort of chieftain”.

Challis does provide the reader with a fairly clear picture of Mali, although it’s not an attractive one. She describes the experience of being beleaguered by beggars with their “beseeching little faces” and she certainly doesn’t underplay the dangers and difficulties of visiting this country. When the group visit Djenne, a World Heritage Site, she details the dirt, the drains and the dead rats without sparing.

All in all, she makes Mali sounds like the kind of place you should leave off your travel agenda, just as this novel should be left off your book list.
Gaxaisvem
This book is the sequel to Footprints in the Sand which I thought was brilliant, well written with a good story line.
Her research for these two books are spot on.