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by Richard Cuffari,Gregory Jaynes
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  • Author:
    Richard Cuffari,Gregory Jaynes
  • ISBN:
    0385115059
  • ISBN13:
    978-0385115056
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Doubleday; 1st edition (1977)
  • Pages:
    209 pages
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1100 kb
  • ePUB format
    1118 kb
  • DJVU format
    1566 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    274
  • Formats:
    txt mbr docx lit


Sketches from a Dirt Road Hardcover – 1977. The book is actually about a later time in Jaynes' life, when he moved his family from Atlanta to a rural Georgia farm, where he worked as a freelance writer and cultivated his natural aversion to jobs and work.

Sketches from a Dirt Road Hardcover – 1977. by. Gregory Jaynes (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central. Gregory Jaynes (Author), Richard Cuffari (Illustrator). And this guy knew virtually nothing about farming or rural stuff of any kind for that matter.

Sketches from a dirt road. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

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Select Format: Hardcover. ISBN13:9780385115056.

Author: Gregory Jaynes, Richard Cuffari. Category: No category.

by Jayne Anne Phillips. Having lived through World War II, Mitch and Jean Hampson struggle to keep their marriage intact in the decades of change that follow. Their son, Billy, dreams of airplanes and goes missing in action in Vietnam. Richard Yates was born in 1926 in New York and lived in California. His prize-winning stories began to appear in 1953 and his first novel, Revolutionary Road, was nominated for the National Book Award in 1961. Published in the United States by Vintage Books, a division of Random House, In. New York, and in Canada by Random House of Canada Limited, Toronto.

Richard Cuffari (March 2, 1925 – 1978) was an award-winning American artist. He is known for his illustrations for children's books and science fiction books. Specializing in historical and nonfiction topics, Cuffari illustrated over 200 books. Cuffari was born to immigrant parents in Brooklyn, New York. He attended James Madison High School, winning awards there for his artwork. During World War II, Cuffari served in the . He graduated from the Pratt Institute in 1949.

Florence; A Sketch-Book. One fee. Stacks of books.

Dirt Road Books Inc. is not another publishing house; it’s something else entirely. A Year in the Kitchen with . Emanuelle is a collection of recipes from the first year of newsletters from Dirt Road Books. It offers twelve delectable dishes, from hearty family fare to party take-alongs and fabulous cocktails. He is known for his illustrations for children's books and science fiction books Contents.


Buriwield
Greg Jaynes is a very funny guy. He is also a good writer. So how come I'd never heard of him? I found his book, Sketches from a Dirt Road, at a garage sale a couple weeks ago. I was slightly put off by the slight mildew stains along the edges of the cover, so I stood there and read a few pages. The first chapter, called simply "Past" told about various jobs he'd had in his youth. He cut brush along the Mississippi (remember how you learned to spell that in grade school, in that sing-song rhythm? "Em-Eye-ess-ess-Eye-ess-ess-Eye-pee-pee-eye") for a riverboat line one summer, which was a sweaty crappy job but he got to sleep on board and even had his own bunk on deck -

"In the night the water and the sky were black as used motor oil. A hundred watt bulb in the ceiling above the bunk shed light on Catcher in the Rye, Lord of the Flies, The Old Man and the Sea, Profiles in Courage, Moby Dick, The Naked and the Dead, and Candy. I particularly liked Candy."

After reading that passage, I was hooked. 'Cause hey, I read all those books too. And what teenage boy doesn't remember first discovering the forbidden delights of that porn classic, Candy.
And if that wasn't enough to hook me, on the very next page he tells of heading off to NYC to seek his fortune -

"I had a two-tone blue (and rust) 1950 Plymouth and I had forty-five dollars. I shared a garret with an unsuccessful actor and I slept on a lawn chair I bought at a five-and-dime. In the days I worked in the mailroom at Decca Records. In the nights I went to dirty movies."

And probably thought about Candy. And while working at Decca he actually met Ricky Nelson. Hey, man, if that had happened to me when I was 18, I probably never would have left Decca.

So I bought the mildewy old book. I think it mighta cost me fifty cents. But that night I was already chuckling and snorting over yet more witticisms, voiced in such a dry, perfect delivery that I literally scarfed this book up at a breakneck pace. The book is actually about a later time in Jaynes' life, when he moved his family from Atlanta to a rural Georgia farm, where he worked as a freelance writer and cultivated his natural aversion to jobs and work. And this guy knew virtually nothing about farming or rural stuff of any kind for that matter. He didn't even seem to know much about dogs, fer cripesakes, as evidenced in an hilarious anecdote about his chicken-chasing, chicken-killing dog, whom he tried to cure of these habits by tying a dead chicken around the dog's neck (a neighbor's suggested rustic rememdy).

"The dog grew dotty after a few days. He would come around the house and one or the other of us would say, 'Phew! Get that dog away from here!'"

Then the dog started chasing cars, until he caught one. "I took him in and spread him before the hearth and removed the smelly chicken. In two days the dog was up and about with a slight limp. Now he chases neither chickens nor cars. However, he is pregnant."

Funny? Hell, yes! And it just keeps getting better, with more stories, most only 3-5 pages long, about deer hunting, firewood, bike trips, Thanksgiving, buying a pony for his son, enjoying "quality time" with his wife (until she takes a job in town), and making a vacation trip back home to Memphis - a particularly hilarious segment in which Jaynes attends a kind of convention for old B-western buffs, where he meets Lash LaRue and Sunset Carson, and also tells of the ratty theater where he went to see all those old movies as a kid, until adolescence. "Then we learned there was a drive-in across the Mississippi River that was showing nudie movies. And we abandoned the Bristol Theater and its Westerns in favor of t*ts. And we never turned back."

It's not all funny stuff though. There are a few surprisingly sensitive stories, like on tender little tale about an aging farm couple called "Story, Made Up."

But why go on? Here's a book that's been out of print for over thirty years, so who's gonna seek it out and read it? Which I find kinda sad. But I'll say it again anyway. This guy is Funny. And as my old army sergeant might have said, "He writes real good." I'll probably tell people about this book, and how much I enjoyed it. And they'll probably say, "From 1977?!" Yeah, old stuff, I know. But still ... - Tim Bazzett, author of SOLDIER BOY: AT PLAY IN THE ASA
Flower
I accidentally picked this book up while in the library and have since read it over and over again. This book is about Jaynes' move to the Georgia countryside from his hectic life in Atlanta. Jaynes tells his adjustment simply and with incredible humor. Its a great book for anyone reflecting a simpler life in the country.