Download The Outlander fb2

by Gil Adamson
Download The Outlander fb2
  • Author:
    Gil Adamson
  • ISBN:
    0887847927
  • ISBN13:
    978-0887847929
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    House of Anansi Press (2008)
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1228 kb
  • ePUB format
    1708 kb
  • DJVU format
    1101 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    684
  • Formats:
    doc azw docx rtf


FREE shipping on qualifying offers. In 1903 a mysterious young woman flees alone across the West, one heart-pounding step ahead of the law.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. At nineteen.

PRAISE FOR THE OUTLANDER Gil Adamson’s The Outlander is, simply enough, a superb novel, and one . Adamson’s characters are fully formed, described with nuances and details that make us feel that we really know them.

PRAISE FOR THE OUTLANDER Gil Adamson’s The Outlander is, simply enough, a superb novel, and one senses in the fine writing the potential, or perhaps the eventuality, of a major writer. And her writing is beautiful - poetic, descriptive, lyrical. This is a book that lingers in the mind long after the final page has been read. In the tradition of Guy Vanderhaeghe, this is a dark novel with a long finish. The Sun Times (Owen Sound).

Gil Adamson has written two acclaimed books of poetry, Primitive and Ashland, and a collection of stories, Help Me. .Her work has also been widely published in magazines and literary journals. The Outlander is her first novel.

Gil Adamson has written two acclaimed books of poetry, Primitive and Ashland, and a collection of stories, Help Me, Jacques Cousteau. ca/Books in Canada First Novel Prize. It has also been shortlisted for the Commonwealth Writers' Prize and nominated for the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award. She lives with writer Kevin Connolly in Toronto.

Adamson, a Toronto-based poet, must possess either an impressive collection of reference books or a powerful imagination - or.

Adamson, a Toronto-based poet, must possess either an impressive collection of reference books or a powerful imagination - or both.

The text of The Outlander is followed by a conversation between the author, Gil Adamson, and the writer Michael Ondaatje.

In 1903 a mysterious young woman flees alone across the West, one. The text of The Outlander is followed by a conversation between the author, Gil Adamson, and the writer Michael Ondaatje. Ms Adamson describes an image that came to her unbidden, one which she set to paper. She saw a young woman in a black I love being drawn in and surprised by a great story. And when the writing is as beautiful as Ms. Adamson’s, a celebrated Canadian poet, it becomes an all-too-rare treat: a book I must tear myself away from as the clock ticks into the start of my work day.

She looked for buildings but there were none. No shadow of human presence. Nothing left of the enterprise but this orchard in its decayed, marching lines. Nothing left of the enterprise but this orchard in its decayed, marching lines avily and the widow slumped on its bare back. A perfume in the air, the ground around them poxed with fallen fruit that lay in layers of years, squelching beneath the horses’ hooves. The rotting apples seethed with drunken wasps

There are plenty of improbabilities in The Outlander, and yet it’s a great read. Adamson is an impressive stylist who knows how to keep an unlikely story moving at a swift and graceful pace. The Toronto Star - Philip Marchand.

There are plenty of improbabilities in The Outlander, and yet it’s a great read. Hearty breakfasts or not, normal lovemaking or not, the novel remains Gothic in tone, with many of the limitations of that genre, including starkly drawn characterization. We must not expect multi-faceted personalities in trolls and goblins.

Outlander, by Gil Adamson.

The Outlander keeps you engrossed with the story the whole book. lay about her but she starved'.


Mightdragon
This is so sad. This book/story-line had great potential. But it doesn't get anywhere. There's no dialogue...it's all narration. There's no direction to the story. I mean, what on earth?!? I read upwards of four books a week and never...NEVER have I not finished a book. It's an OCD thing...I gotta finish a book or I feel like I'm on the verge of falling off a cliff or something. Well folks...I'm cured! I'm proud to say I got to chapter six and I think I deserve a trophy...or at the very least, a standing ovation...but I'm so bored I cannot go any further. Sorry...but I'm bored reading about a bull standing in a field with stars shining off it's back...or a copse of trees...the density of the forest...the leaves floating in a stream. Good golly. Thank heavens this was a freebie. Now I know why.
JoJosho
Oh, this book. I don't like giving negative reviews or feedback because writing books is difficult. But reading this book was also difficult. Let me start by saying that I did not finish this book. Its still in my Kindle and I made it about less than half of the way in. The writing is great. The story...it was confusing to me.

Things that I liked about the book:
-strong images via tight writing which flowed nicely
-believable characters
-awesome time and setting of the story

Things I did not like:
-The main character being referred to simply as the "widow" instead of by her name. That actually really irritated me.
-Nothing exciting happening the entire time I read. The murder happened before the book's opening, but all we see is her running from her pursuers. She doesn't struggle. She doesn't think about what's happened. As a reader, I felt completely in the dark and it ruined immersion for me.
-It was difficult for me to keep going for the reasons mentioned above, so I stopped. I don't feel good about this. I like to give every book its fair shake. But this is one of few books that I just couldn't make it through.

*The thing about writing reviews is that it can sway people from buying/not buying a book. I'm not saying these things to keep anyone from purchasing it. It just wasn't for me. I like stories that captivate me from the beginning and never let me go. What I read was just lines upon lines of bla bla she's running away. There is nothing mentioned about why she killed her husband. No EMOTION shown of her lamenting the loss of him and that relationship. And how did his brothers know it was her? Without a clue is how this story left me. But a lot of other reviewers seemed to like it so perhaps its just me. Best wishes to the author for much success in writing anyway.
Snake Rocking
I am a member of a book club and as 'The Outlander' came highly recommended we chose it without hesitation. But what a disappointment. I couldn't believe that a book without a plot , a beginning , middle or end could possibly span six hundred pages. I did like the style of writing used by Gil Adamson in the book and in my opinion this was the only redeeming feature. The description of the wild open spaces and the natural beauty of remote Canada was excellent, but after about 100 pages of this it became boring in the extreme. I did not enjoy this book at all as it was grey, bleak and downbeat . I was very tempted to give up about half way through, but I thought it could only improve, so I persisted to the end . And what a stupid ending ... 'Find me' .It was probably the only book that we read in the club since we started two years ago, that got such a unanimous negative response.
Thozius
First of all, this is a fantastic story about a young woman surviving and becoming stronger in the process. The setting is in rugged country in the Northwest, U.S. and western Canada. The people she meets along the way are very interesting in their own right. There are miners, horse thieves, people supporting the mining community such as a rather unorthodox preacher and an owner of the local store, a man living out on the land for years, Native Americans, a somewhat strange and kind lady, and more. Their daily life is there for you to see. The environment is described beautifully. The detail of every aspect of life in that place and time is there, yet it is not a detraction or boring. There is always the story moving right along. A totally remarkable book.