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by Alan Furst
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Thrillers & Suspense
  • Author:
    Alan Furst
  • ISBN:
    0375758585
  • ISBN13:
    978-0375758584
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Random House Trade Paperbacks; Reprint edition (January 8, 2002)
  • Pages:
    268 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Thrillers & Suspense
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1909 kb
  • ePUB format
    1138 kb
  • DJVU format
    1227 kb
  • Rating:
    4.3
  • Votes:
    886
  • Formats:
    docx doc mobi azw


The World at Night" is the fourth volume in Alan Furst's loosely connected tales of espionage in World War II, and it. .Considering the first book, Night Soldiers, was a robust 519 pages, I have to call him out on this money-grab. A good story, but not great.

The World at Night" is the fourth volume in Alan Furst's loosely connected tales of espionage in World War II, and it marks a bit of departure from the previous books. Focusing on an ordinary citizen rather than intelligence operatives or soldiers, the story instead shows us a different kind of wartime experience - one that will be more familiar to most readers, and therefore, in some ways, more impactful.

The World at Night: A Novel (Night Soldiers Book 4. Alan Furst was unknown to me until my local newspaper ran a story about his current novel, A Hero of France, since he was to appear in person at the next meeting of the paper's book club

The World at Night: A Novel (Night Soldiers Book 4). Alan Furst. Kingdom of Shadows: A Novel (Night Soldiers Book 6). Alan Furst was unknown to me until my local newspaper ran a story about his current novel, A Hero of France, since he was to appear in person at the next meeting of the paper's book club. Most of the spy stories I've read were told from the Western point of view, but this glimpse into the Stalin-era Russian operation was eye-opening.

The World at Night: A Novel. A thoroughly compelling read, I will be reading the entire series.

From Alan Furst, the author of such spy novels as Dark Star, Night Soldiers, and The Polish Officer, comes The World .

From Alan Furst, the author of such spy novels as Dark Star, Night Soldiers, and The Polish Officer, comes The World at Night. Set in Paris just following the fall of France to Germany in 1940, the book tracks film producer Jean Casson, a hard-core denizen of Paris nightlife. The Nazi occupation brings with it shortages, travel restrictions, and the petty humiliations of life under the German occupiers.

Praise for Alan Furst and The World at Night. is the world of Eric Ambler, the pioneering British author of classic World War II espionage fiction. Jean Casson is a reluctant and almost-accidental double agent, an ordinary man caught up in extraordinary circumstances. Furst’s work is full of the kind of irony that is both universal and specifically French. Richard Dyer, The Boston Globe. What is engaging is the idea of the unintentional secret agent, the amateur who has read Eric Ambler. Herbert Mitgang, Chicago Tribune.

The World at Night book. It's an intelligent novel with authentic detail, moments of humour and terror, and a sting in the tail

The World at Night book. It's an intelligent novel with authentic detail, moments of humour and terror, and a sting in the tail. In these dark Trumpian days it's instructive to see how people of an earlier age dealt with an even greater There was a slow build-up and the novel didn't really catch fire for me until the final third, but that is maybe as it should be.

The World at Night (1996) is a novel by Alan Furst. The story takes place in and around Paris between May 1940 and June 1941

The World at Night (1996) is a novel by Alan Furst. The story takes place in and around Paris between May 1940 and June 1941. Jean Casson is a French motion-picture producer who specializes in gangster films and who possesses no political views to speak of. When the Germans defeat and conquer his country, Casson at first tries to continue his life and career as if nothing had happened.

Электронная книга "The World at Night: A Novel", Alan Furst. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The World at Night: A Novel" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

However, the 1988 publication of Night Soldiers inspired by a 1984 trip to Eastern Europe on assignment for Esquire revitalized his career. It was the first of his highly original novels about espionage in Europe before and during the Second World War. Born in New York on February 20, 1941, he lived for long periods in France, especially Paris where he was awarded a Fulbright teaching fellowship. ALAN FURST is widely recognized as the master of the historical spy novel. Casson is mystified and terrified as he is slowly sucked into the vortex. First-rate reading-vivid, compelling, and rich with authentic detail about clandestine battles and battlegrounds. No one evokes World War II behind the lines better than Alan Furst does. He is the author of Night Soldiers, Dark Star, The Polish Officer, Red Gold, Kingdom of Shadows, Blood of Victory, Dark Voyage, and The Foreign Correspondent.

Paris, 1940. The civilized, upper-class life of film producer Jean Casson is derailed by the German occupation of Paris, but Casson learns that with enough money, compromise, and connections, one need not deny oneself the pleasures of Parisian life. Somewhere inside Casson, though, is a stubborn romantic streak. When he’s offered the chance to take part in an operation of the British secret service, this idealism gives him the courage to say yes. A simple mission, but it goes wrong, and Casson realizes he must gamble everything—his career, the woman he loves, life itself. Here is a brilliant re-creation of France—its spirit in the moment of defeat, its valor in the moment of rebirth.

Hidden Winter
In the Paris of 1940, Jean Casson is a French motion-picture producer with a relatively prosperous life. He has made some decent films, he has work coming in, he is well-liked by the ladies of the city, and he has a steady circle of upper middle class friends. When the Nazis invade Belgium, it is, of course, the talk of the entire nation, but the French are confident that, having been victorious over Germany in 1918, they will blacken Hitler's eye if he pivots toward France.

The sheer speed and efficiency of the invading German forces, however, quickly puts the lie to that notion, and France surrenders with barely a whimper, divided into an occupied territory and the Zone Non-Occupee (ZNO) - Vichy France, under the control of the puppet, Marshall Pétain. Like every other Parisian, Casson struggles to adjust to his new reality, convinced that the invaders are simply one more thing with which they must cope.

And it against this backdrop that the reader is introduced to life under foreign military occupation: the bureaucracy, the monitoring, the rationing, the sudden loss of status, and the struggle to lead something close to a normal existence. Casson at first tries to continue his life and career as if nothing had happened - shopping a script for a new film and pursuing the beauiful Citrine, perhaps the only woman he has ever truly loved - but the fatalistic idea that life will simply go on gradually becomes impossible, and Casson must choose between submission or resistance.

"The World at Night" is the fourth volume in Alan Furst's loosely connected tales of espionage in World War II, and it marks a bit of departure from the previous books. Focusing on an ordinary citizen rather than intelligence operatives or soldiers, the story instead shows us a different kind of wartime experience - one that will be more familiar to most readers, and therefore, in some ways, more impactful. It is a story not of glory or heroics, but of adaptation, determination, tragedy and small victories often rooted as much in chance and survival instinct as in forethought and bravery.

"The World at Night" is not at the same elite level of literature as Furst's "Night Soldiers" or "The Polish Officer," but that's an incredibly difficult level of achievement to maintain, and it is nonetheless a compelling work. As the author continues to paint a picture that spans a universe of experiences during the second world war, the story of Jean Casson is a worthy addition.
Cells
This, the 4th book in the series, does not live up to the levels of the first 3. The story just isn't as good, and didn't leave me with anticipation as the others did. What I mean by that, is that when I finished a chapter or came to a point where I could stop for a while in the first 3 books, I would think of what situation the character was in and how he would proceed during the day(s) when I wasn't reading it. That didn't happen with The World at Night. And, to add a Spoiler Alert, the next book in the series is just a continuation of the 4th book, and I felt insulted by this. Just as when a movie producer decides to make TWO movies out of ONE book (Part 1 and Part 2) just to maximize the profit, Furst produced 2 books but could easily have released one long book. He chose to release a 324 page book (this one), followed by a "Part 2" book (Red Gold) of 272 pages. Considering the first book, Night Soldiers, was a robust 519 pages, I have to call him out on this money-grab. A good story, but not great. I'll take an extra star off my review of Red Gold for this, for sure.
Snake Rocking
First, a general comment on Furst's WW2 era novels. This is the sixth Furst novel I've read. I have loved reading WW2 history for most of my 60 years but the emotional connection to the time and events always seemed distant, elusive, just out of reach. Furst's novels (and Pillip Kerr's 'Bernie Gunter' novels, too) have finally let me 'live in the moment' more than any experience I've had through any other medium, like movies, or TV, no matter how well made they are. Furst conveys the culture, the fashions, the very atmosphere (literally, weather, temperature, sky), sounds and smells of this world of Europe on the brink of war. His characters become real because the gives them context, motivations, character and abilities that make them believable within their times and places. You can actually learn the geography, climate and character and cultural quirks of major European cities, particularly the Paris of this era. These books are literally paper time machines.
This novel is a typically good evocation of Paris as the Battle of France happens and its aftermath. The ending is not satisfactory, as others have pointed out and you should read the sequel, Red Gold to tie it up. Still, if you ever wondered what it was like for the French living in occupied France, this is as close as you will get to feeling it.
ALAN
It’s May 1940 as Hitler’s forces are about to invade France. Film producer Jean-Claude Casson is in need of money and a script to make his next movie but both are in short supply. There is a pervading gloom around Paris but, as Casson observes, one must survive. Children would be born, bakers would make bread, lovers would make love, dinner parties would be given, and, in that way, France would go on being France.
The situation becomes even worse when the Germans easily defeat France and occupy Paris. Furst is a master in describing the suffocation which the French feel and the compromises they must make just to live a simple life. Even the idealistic Casson is recruited to take part in a British secret service operation but soon discovers it’s a lot harder and more dangerous than it was ever portrayed on the silver screen.
Furst builds tension quite slowly, giving the reader realistic details of how it must have been during that dark period of France’s history. Casson walks a narrow and dangerous path trying to elude German spies but they are meticulous record keepers and seem to have more than enough manpower to investigate everyone in all possible locales. To make matters even worse, Casson is kept from being with the actress Citrine, the love of his life.
The book’s ending seemed ambiguous, one which Furst might have written in such a way to allow the reader to arrive at his or her own conclusion.