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by Robert B. Parker
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Thrillers & Suspense
  • Author:
    Robert B. Parker
  • ISBN:
    0440203430
  • ISBN13:
    978-0440203438
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Dell (April 2, 1989)
  • Subcategory:
    Thrillers & Suspense
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1525 kb
  • ePUB format
    1719 kb
  • DJVU format
    1318 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    963
  • Formats:
    docx azw doc lit


Shelve Robert B. Parker: The Spenser Novels 28-33.

Shelve Crimson Joy. Want to Read. Shelve Robert B.

Robert Brown Parker (September 17, 1932 – January 18, 2010) was an American writer of fiction, primarily of the mystery/detective genre. His most famous works were the 40 novels written about the fictional private detective Spenser

Robert Brown Parker (September 17, 1932 – January 18, 2010) was an American writer of fiction, primarily of the mystery/detective genre. His most famous works were the 40 novels written about the fictional private detective Spenser. ABC television network developed the television series Spenser: For Hire based on the character in the mid-1980s; a series of TV movies based on the character were also produced. His works incorporate encyclopedic knowledge of the Boston metropolitan area.

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FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Spenser joins Lieutenant Quirk and Sergeant Belson in pursuing a serial killer of Black women and their investigation points to one of Susan's patients.

Crimson Joy (Spenser 15) By Robert B. Parker CHAPTER 1 Sheridan Street in Jamaica Plain goes uphill from Center Street for about two hundred yards, crests, and heads down . Crimson Joy. (Spenser 15). By. Robert B. Parker. Parker CHAPTER 1 Sheridan Street in Jamaica Plain goes uphill from Center Street for about two hundred yards, crests, and heads down toward. CHAPTER 1. Sheridan Street in Jamaica Plain goes uphill from Center Street for about two hundred yards, crests, and heads down toward Chestnut Avenue.

Crimson Joy s-15 (Spenser Year Published: 2004. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading. Year Published: 2004.

Author Robert B. Books by Robert B. Parker

Author Robert B. 9/10 8. Parker: Back Story. 10., 10. Small Vices.

Born and raised in Massachusetts, Robert B. Parker completed a PhD in English at Boston University. He began writing his Spenser novels in 1971 while teaching at Boston's Northeastern University. Little did he suspect then that his witty, literate prose and psychological insights would make him keeper-of-the-flame of America's rich tradition of detective fiction. He was named Grand Master of the 2002 Edgar Awards by the Mystery Writers of America. Библиографические данные. Crimson Joy (A Spenser Mystery) The Spenser Series.

almost impossible to put down. Sacramento Union In the city of the Red Sox and the Red Line someone. almost impossible to put down. In the city of the Red Sox and the Red Line someone is leaving roses-red ones, of course-on the bodies of women he kills. For a psychologist named Susan Silverman and a . named Spenser, the case is personal. But Spenser knows it's the wrong man. Because the right one has come calling on Susan-with a red rose in hand.

A serial killer is on the loose in Beantown and the cops can't catch him. But when the killer leaves his red rose calling card for Spenser's own Susan Silverman, he gets all the attention that Spenser and Hawk can give.Spenser plays against time while he tracks the Red Rose killer from Boston's Combat Zone to the suburbs. His trap is both daring and brave, and gives the story a satisfying climax.

Uleran
A violent, sadistic serial killer is stalking the women of Boston and the first four victims are all black. Naturally the residents of this fair city assume the violence is race based but readers of this unique tale are in for a major lesson in psychiatry as the solution to the case is revealed. Moreover, early indications are that the killer is in fact a cop (*gasps*) which justifies the strong and long term roles played by Quirk and his uniformed associates right throughout the tale.

This story is unique in the Spenser series as it is without the trademark cynicism and humour normally found when reading of the adventures of Spenser and Hawk. In this book, Boston is a cold, wet city lost in the grip of fear. As a bonus Mr Parker has taken the liberty of providing the reader with some singularly beautiful pieces of dialogue ...

"...it was one of those deceptive days in April when it seems like spring and the wind is a velvet conceit on the lingering reality of winter..." (Taken from location 865 of the kindle version)

And pertaining to the status of our modern day lovers...

"...because I love you," I said. "Because you are in my life like the music at the end of silence."

(Taken from location 1772 of the kindle version)

Susan's role in CRIMSON JOY is her standard one. That is, not only does she present her stunningly beautiful persona but her intellectual inputs to the reading experience are worth the price of admission alone.

The solution is completely satisfying and the suspense is high quite near the end when a much loved character becomes the assumed target of the story's villain. Spenser saves the day, once again.

But the real hero of the story is Robert B Parker.
Llathidan
Robert B. Parker. The absolute master of dialogue in this genre. If you're a Spenser fan, this one won't let you down. If you haven't read Parker, this is as good a place to start as any (unlike many authors nowadays, it is not necessary to read Parker's novels in any particular order.) I am close to being able to say I've read them all and I've never read one I didn't like. Same goes for his Jesse Stone novels and those two or three amazing westerns. Oh, and yes, Hawk is in this one.
Iphonedivorced
The first thing I noticed and liked about this "Spenser" book was that it was 292 pages, one of the longer ones. Then I was delighted that Hawk played an active role in the story--always a plus.
A severely psychotic serial killer, a white man, is killing Black women in Spenser's hometown of Boston, and Quirk and Belson of the Boston PD request Spenser's help. Conveniently, Spenser is not bound by the rules required of a police officer. He can break into places without a warrant, harass people, exchange favors with mobsters, all kinds of fun things.
When the serial killer gets too interested in Susan Silverman, Spenser's girlfriend, the job becomes personal. Yet before the story ends the killer is eliciting Spenser's pity, and probably the readers' as well.
Susan Silverman, the woman Spenser puts so high on a pedestal she probably needs to wear an oxygen tank, is detestable. She is vain, self-centered, insensitive and materialistic, with a Ph-D from Harvard, which she never lets Spenser forget. She says degrading things to him which are supposed to be taken as jokes, daintily picks at her food, sips and nibbles in such an affected way, that it makes me wish I could reach into the book and smack her upside the head. In several stories her pigheadedness and determination to have her own way have put Spenser and Hawk in life and death situations for which she never seems to feel any guilt. I would be delighted if she did not exist.
I've read most of the thirty-something Spenser novels. I've not read one I did not thoroughly enjoy--some a little more than others. Crimson Joy may be one of the better ones.
There is an enigmatic thread in regard to Spenser and Hawk's relationship that runs through all the stories. It becomes more profound, or at least is emphasized more as the stories progress. Crimson Joy is one of the stories in which this unfathomable connection is particularly noticeable. They appear to be more than friends, more than brothers, lack the physical connection to be lovers, yet they seem to be a combination of all these things. They trust each other unconditionally. Their respect for each other borders on idolatry. They would die for each other, and have proven their willingness to do so any number of times. Hawk almost always calls Spenser "Babe" (in A Catskill Eagle he even called him "Honey"), Susan once made a snide remark about them eloping together, and in Crimson Joy when Hawk made a remark that a woman was falling in love with him, Spenser said, "I don't blame her." There are many other such examples. Yet they are both wild about women. The undefinable bond between them is one of the important reasons I have been drawn to the Spenser novels.
Kelenn
It started out ok and seemed like it would be one of the better entries in the series but halfway through Parker just got stupid. He turned a decent crime story into a stupid, childish romance story between Spenser and his whiny girlfriend, Susan. It was just a ton of high schoolish crap. I've read a about 10 in the series. They're starting to get really lousy. I think I need to take a long break before, if or when, I read another.