Download The Wrong Case fb2

by James Crumley
Download The Wrong Case fb2
Thrillers & Suspense
  • Author:
    James Crumley
  • ISBN:
    0394735587
  • ISBN13:
    978-0394735580
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Vintage Crime/Black Lizard; 1st Vintage Books ed edition (December 12, 1985)
  • Pages:
    288 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Thrillers & Suspense
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1305 kb
  • ePUB format
    1538 kb
  • DJVU format
    1775 kb
  • Rating:
    4.2
  • Votes:
    567
  • Formats:
    doc lrf mbr txt


James Crumley is a first-rate American write. yrotechnically entertaining, sexy, compassionate. The Wrong Case is in the tradition of the Dashiell Hammett of The Glass Key and does full honor to Hammett.

James Crumley is a first-rate American write. The corrupt town comes alive, the story is powerful, the writing is high calibre. If you like your detective fiction tough and tenacious, you will love James Crumle. o one does it better. the houston chronicle. Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler and Ross MacDonald have been looking for a successor. Now they have him. -the boston phoenix.

Only 15 left in stock (more on the way). The style invites comparisons to Raymond Chandler mostly due to the genre and the fact that Crumley has a certain way of presenting a sentence that is almost lyrical or poetic at times while still never letting the reader lose the sense that what is being read contains some greater secret about the harsh truth of life. 4 people found this helpful.

James Crumley was an American crime writer considered the "patron saint .

James Crumley was an American crime writer considered the "patron saint of the post-Vietnam private eye novel" and a literary. Seventy-nine years ago today in Three Rivers, Texas, James Crumley was born.

James Crumley was born in Three Rivers, Texas, and spent most of his childhood in South Texas. After serving three years in the . Army and completing college degrees in history (BA, Texas College of Arts and Industries) and creative writing (MFA, University of Iowa), he joined the English faculty at the University of Montana at Missoula. He was also a visiting professor at a number of other institutions around the country, including the University of Texas at El Paso, Colorado State University, Reed College, and Carnegie-Mellon

James Crumley's first detective novel isn't quite as good as "The Last Good Kiss," but it is very good indeed.

James Crumley's first detective novel isn't quite as good as "The Last Good Kiss," but it is very good indeed. Detective Milo Milodragovitch's neurotic wistfulness is less engaging than . Sughrue's manic rage and joy, but he can drink just as much and has just as keen an eye for the flaws and foibles of human nature.

see photo The book is signed a second time on the title page.

The dust jacket shows wear, please see photo. see photo The book is signed a second time on the title page.

None of the books that Crumley wrote ever became bestsellers, but he had a cult . The Wrong Case (1975) – novel, Milo Milodragovitch series. The James Crumley Papers are housed at the Wittliff Collections, Texas State University in San Marcos.

None of the books that Crumley wrote ever became bestsellers, but he had a cult following devoted to his writing and received frequent critical acclaim a compelling study of the gratuitous violence in me. . The Last Good Kiss (1978) – novel, . Dancing Bear (1983) – novel, Milo series.

The Wrong Case Crumley, James Random House (USA) 9780394735580 : An extraordinary detective story from .

The Wrong Case Crumley, James Random House (USA) 9780394735580 : An extraordinary detective story from one of the great American crime fiction authors. Milo once had a thriving. Milo once had a thriving divorce-case business in the small town of in the Pacific Northwest, but because of liberal new divorce laws he has taken to drinking and staring out the window. Hes up to his third drink of the morning when an attractive young woman walks into his office and asks him to find her brother. He takes on what seems a routine missing-person case in hopes of getting to know her better, but finds himself involved in what is most definitely the wrong case.

Detective Milo Dragovitch spends too much time boozing until he gets caught up in a case involving two-bit criminals and an old lady on the run. His friends call him Milo. No one has ever called him Bud except his father, long dead, and now Sarah Weddington, stirring painful memoires and offering him his first case since he abandoned his private practice and took a job marking time on the night shift for Haliburton Security. The case seems almost too easy, hardly worth the large fee, just to satisfy this old woman's curiosity.

Milo Milodragovitch is a once-successful divorce lawyer, who now prefers to spend his days drinking and staring out the window. That all changes when Helen Duffy walks into his office and asks him to find her missing brother

Milo Milodragovitch is a once-successful divorce lawyer, who now prefers to spend his days drinking and staring out the window. That all changes when Helen Duffy walks into his office and asks him to find her missing brother. Though it's not his usual line of work, Milo agrees to help - he needs the money, and he wants to spend more time with this beautiful woman. But this is far from a routine case, and whispers of a long-past crime haunt Milo's every move. As sweetly profane a poet as American noir could have asked for' Ian Rankin.

An extraordinary detective story from one of the great American crime fiction authors. Milo once had a thriving divorce-case business in the small town of in the Pacific Northwest, but because of liberal new divorce laws he has taken to drinking and staring out the window. He's up to his third drink of the morning when an attractive young woman walks into his office and asks him to find her brother. He takes on what seems a routine missing-person case in hopes of getting to know her better, but finds himself involved in what is most definitely the wrong case. Everyone is a victim, one way or another, of a crime that took place long before the novel begins.

godlike
This is one author I really wanted to meet. I often get mad that I didn't make more effort to do so. To promote him as an inheritor of the gumshoe/pulp/noir mantle from Hammett or Chandler or McDonald misses much of what is great about Crumley. He improved the genre greatly; developed his own brand of "noir"; changed the setting entirely; and presented it in artistic prose that is all his own and far better than those before him ever attempted. Robert B. Parker followed in Crumley's footsteps with gumshoe novels as quality literature (in his later years), though the beauty of Parker's prose was more in its sparseness and directness: prose evocative of Hemmingway. Very fortunately, I did get to meet Robert B. Parker.
The Wrong Case is a Milo novel that sets him on another self-discovery/wrong case, which is apropos for all that has gone wrong in his 39 years. His family legacy is great, but his future is bleak. In this novel, he is often too drunk to realize that his present is even bleaker at a time when his friends meet unkind ends and nobody tells him the truth. It's the worst possible mix for an untrained and and underworked private eye. He limps through it all with false hopes fueled by booze and women and little else, least of all self-confidence; and somehow comes through it all, but with about as little to show for it all as anyone could imagine - which is all typical for another saga in the life of Milo.
If you're looking for happy endings then Crumley is not your man. If you are looking for quality literature structured like a gumshoe novel, then you have come to exactly the right place, even if it is The Wrong Case.
Akirg
Milton Chester "Milo" Milodragovitch was once a very successful private investigator, he made his living as the kind of sleazy keyhole peeper who kicked in doors to snap photos for use as evidence in divorce cases, then they invented the no-fault divorce and the bottom dropped out. On the plus side he has a sizable inheritance from his wealthy father's estate coming on his 53rd birthday... on the downside that's more than a decade away and, between his hard partying ways and questionable life choices, it's anybody's guess as to whether he'll live that long. His mentor is a long disbarred attorney named Simon who has given up on society to become a first rate drunk... Milo is starting to think Simon might have the right idea!

The Wrong Case has Milo agreeing to take on a missing person case for the simple reason that he is attracted to the missing man's sister... the money isn't bad either, but it's mostly for the girl. The resulting investigation turns into a disaster when bodies begin piling up, an inexplicable junkie crime spree hits town, and Milo can't seem to get a handle on exactly what's going on or why. But, with a stubborn streak of tenacity that might get him killed, Milo is determined to solve the case and get the girl.

Milo is a redneck in the classic style, a hard drinking, hell-raising good ol' boy with more guts than brains. He's reckless and self indulgent with no tolerance of rules or regulations of any kind and, like most classic hard-boiled types, he drinks WAY too much. It being the Seventies he's also known to indulge in illegal drugs like speed and marijuana from time to time. He's a hard-case (as well as something of a head-case at times) but he's also a bit of a soft touch. Sure, he'll knock you on your butt, but then he'll probably help you up, apologize, and buy you a drink.

This novel won't be everyone's cup of Irish coffee, it's brooding, it's gritty, the mystery itself isn't all that great, the plot is a little hard to believe at times and none of the characters possess much in the way of redeeming qualities. These people are who they are and, while they may indulge in a little self pity from time to time, they aren't looking to change. Imagine something like Leaving Las Vegas as a detective story and you're getting close to the tone of this novel.

The style invites comparisons to Raymond Chandler mostly due to the genre and the fact that Crumley has a certain way of presenting a sentence that is almost lyrical or poetic at times while still never letting the reader lose the sense that what is being read contains some greater secret about the harsh truth of life.

The book contains adult language, sex, violence and racial slurs.
Dianazius
Boought it when I saw it recommended in a small bookstore as a novel creating a special atmosphere. The atmosphere is surely there, but drowned in a writing style that made progressing to the end like a long walk through molasses. Perhaps we really have changed since this was written, and got dumbed by far easier prose designed for page turner thrillers....
The Rollers of Vildar
The Wrong Case: by James Crumley was Excellent! The Case gets you emotionally involved from the very start. I've heard of Crumley and always wanted to check him out. I was not disappointed and neither will you. Set in a fictional mid-western city called Merriweather, you are drawn into a sordid world of booze and drugs along with a great cast of misfits and neerdowells. Though dated, the hardboiled writing style and the plot, touches upon timeless themes of love and death that never grow old. As a matter of fact, the dated quality of the story makes it that much better. You are transported to a time (late 60's early 70's) that is at once familiar yet strangely abstract because of the never changing human condition. Highly recommend.
Kabei
Another craftily interwoven hunt for the answer leaves me hanging til the very end to see how all the pieces tie together. I am a bit prejudices because I love the references to Montana and the Northwest and characters true to life on the seedy side of town... but the unfolding is great, no matter where he take us! I still don't know who done it or what case is the right case and I am only 40 pages from the end. Milo is one tough privite eye who keeps me coming back for more! The Wrong Case
Risa
Crumley's writing and character's are addictive.
Zymbl
I didn't particularly like it. Probably not his best effort. Like his other books, a lot is left unexplained at the end.
Crumley was a masterful writer of modern fiction. I always want to read every word with Crumley...and re-read quite often also...very thought provoking material and impossible to predict the outcome! My favorite!