» » The Last Thing He Wanted

Download The Last Thing He Wanted fb2

by Joan Didion
Download The Last Thing He Wanted fb2
Thrillers & Suspense
  • Author:
    Joan Didion
  • ISBN:
    0002240807
  • ISBN13:
    978-0002240802
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Alfred A. Knopf (1996)
  • Pages:
    216 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Thrillers & Suspense
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1472 kb
  • ePUB format
    1914 kb
  • DJVU format
    1427 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    831
  • Formats:
    txt mbr lrf lit


The Last Thing He Wanted is a novel by Joan Didion. It was published by Alfred A. Knopf in 1996

The Last Thing He Wanted is a novel by Joan Didion. Knopf in 1996. The story centers around Elena McMahon, a reporter for the Washington Post who quits her job covering the 1984 United States presidential election to care for her father after her mother's death. In an unusual turn of events, she inherits his position as an arms dealer for the . Government in Central America.

Joan Didion is that rare thing: an American woman of letters whose pronouncements on that country's way .

Joan Didion is that rare thing: an American woman of letters whose pronouncements on that country's way of life are considered to bear great weight. Journalist, essayist, novelist and columnist, her intelligent and perceptive observations have probed her nation's psyche for three decades. This is certainly the case in The Last Thing He Wanted, which chronicles the mishaps of a novice on the scene of international arms smuggling on an unnamed Caribbean Island.

This is the first Joan Didion book I've read and definitely the last. I had somehow missed the memo on The Last Thing He Wanted

This is the first Joan Didion book I've read and definitely the last. The best thing about this book is the spare writing style. At first, I really liked how she would select certain phrases uttered by various characters and repeat them to give them greater impact. But after awhile, it got, well repetitious. I had somehow missed the memo on The Last Thing He Wanted. When I looked for her work on the shelf, I always went strait for some vintage copy of Play It as It Lays or to the early nonfiction, always passing over her last novel because the title was too vague, the cover image of file folders not helping the case against its dimness.

Joan Didion was born in Sacramento, California

Joan Didion was born in Sacramento, California. Библиографические данные. The Last Thing He Wanted Vintage International.

Oscar winners Anne Hathaway and Ben Affleck star in director Dee Rees's gripping thriller based on Joan Didion's novel. Movies Based on Books, Dramas, Political Dramas, Thrillers, Political Thrillers. A hard-hitting reporter becomes entangled in the story she’s trying to break when she helps her ailing father broker an arms deal in Central America.

He had known she was an American because he recognized in her voice when she spoke to a waiter the slight flat . Elena McMahon got caught, but not in the glare. If you wanted to see how she got caught you would probably begin with the documents.

He had known she was an American because he recognized in her voice when she spoke to a waiter the slight flat drawl of the American Southwest, but the American women left on the island were embassy or the very occasional reporter, and neither would be sitting at apparent loose ends in the Intercon coffee shop. There are documents, more than you might think. Depositions, testimony, cable traffic, some of it not yet declassified but much in the public record.

A ruthless dissection of American life in the late 1960s, from the author of The Last Thing He Wanted and A Book of Common Prayer. Somewhere out beyond Hollywood, resting actress Maria Wyeth drifts along the freeway in perpetual motion, anaesthetized to pain and pleasure, seemingly untainted by her personal history.

Автор: Didion, Joan Название: The Last Thing He Wanted Издательство: Random House (USA) Классификация . Here is the one writer we always want to read on California showing us the startling contradictions in its and in America s core values.

Here is the one writer we always want to read on California showing us the startling contradictions in its and in America s core values.

Alone on the dock where her father berthed the Kitty Rex. Working loose a splinter on the planking with the toe of her sandal. the sweet heavy air of South Florida. Standing in the door of the frame shack, under the sign that read RENTALS GAS BAIT BEER AMMO. Leaning against the counter. Watching Elena through the screen door as he waited for change. Angle on the manager.

a life of celebrity fundraisers and from her powerful West Coast husband, Wynn Janklow, whom she has left, taking Catherine, her daughter, to become a reporter for The Washington Post


MegaStar
I was being sent to Puerto Rico to film a scene in the new movie for Netflix with Anne Hathaway and Ben Affleck "The Last Thing He Wanted" so before I left I wanted to research and read the book, the book came so fast and for an awesome low price!!!
Anazan
Context of time and location is all over the place. Boring as well. Some good knowledge of and interest in WW2 era is helpful. I read for pleasure, therefore did not finish this book.
Ann
Joan Didion is that rare thing: an American woman of letters whose pronouncements on that country's way of life are considered to bear great weight. Journalist, essayist, novelist and columnist, her intelligent and perceptive observations have probed her nation's psyche for three decades.

In this, her 10th book and fifth novel, she turns a fictional probe on the machinations of American politics in the Orwellian significant year of 1984. The story takes in the workings of US central administration and international diplomacy, as well as the American media and the shady operators who work on the fringes of State corruption.

Elena McMahon is a journalist reporting on the presidential election campaign when, to oblige her father, Dick, who "does deals", she goes to Central America in his stead. There she find herself adrift, a pawn in a game with rules she can only begin to grasp, at the heart of an arms trafficking operation and a political conspiracy around Treat Morrison, American Ambassador-At-Large.

Elena's story is related by an unnamed, "not quite omniscient author... who wanted the story to materialise for you [reader] as it did for me [narrator]". The novel employs such tricks throughout, calling attention to an awareness of its own methods and questioning the conventions of all modern narrative forms - fiction, journalism, thriller writing, reportage, even film scripts. "What we want here is a montage, music over," begins one chapter. "Angle on Elena. Alone on the dock... taking of her scarf and shaking out her hair."

Didion is a superb stylist with a number of signature techniques, the most characteristic being the way she repeats key phrases with minute but important variations. With each repetition a seemingly innocuous phrase - "Christ, what business are they all in?" or "My understanding is that Dick McMahon will not be a problem" - becomes ever more significant. Beginning with Elena's meeting with Treat Morrison, the narrative moves forward and back in time, layering phrases and events on top of each other with an incancatory rhythm. The effect is to engender in the reader first suspicion, then dread, and finally understanding.

The climax of the novel - the last outcome, Treat Morrison tells us, that he would have wanted - is not unexpected, it has in fact been flagged for us on page 15. But the reasons that it happens are presented through a finely woven web of intrigue and counter-intrigue. Through dark details, quiet understatement and subtle ironies Elena's entrapment within this complex web is revealed.

Nobody could fault Didion's technical skill. But this reader was left with a "so-what" feeling on finishing this book. Yes, American politics is rotten. Yes, what happened to Elena is terrible. But we are no more moved by her fate than we would be by an in-depth newspaper report.

In her journalism and essays, Didion's techniques are illuminating, her intelligence flashing light on the murkier corners of American life. But fiction can deal only secondarily with the national character; its first duty is to its own characters, and in the best fiction characters are more than just vehicles for ideas, which is essentially what Elena, Treat and the rest turn out to be. Didion's technical brilliance may disguise this but ultimately does not compensate for it. Here, rather than illuminating, it obscures.

This novel is a cold and clever exploration of the USA's heart of darkness but those who expect novels to also reveal something of the human heart will be disappointed.
Shaktizragore
If you have read a number of Joan Didion novels, particularly starting in the 1980s, she turns her attention progressively on our neighbors in to the south, and American meddling in their internal affairs. This is certainly the case in The Last Thing He Wanted, which chronicles the mishaps of a novice on the scene of international arms smuggling on an unnamed Caribbean Island.

As many commentators have said, there are deep shades of Graham Greene in this novel (and most of the other novels she has written in this vein). For someone moving through Didion's oeuvre, there is not anything new to stimulate. If you are coming to Didion fresh, no doubt you are in for an interesting ride. Didion had a terse way of building narrative tension. She moves back and forth in time effortlessly, allowing the reader to see every nook and cranny of her created world.

However, if you have read her a great deal, this world is a repeat. Her concerns in this period are rather narrow, and it comes across in this novel.
Vikus
This book is a rarity-- experimental writing that isn't boring. That's because Didion isn't playing with words as with most experimental writing, but working them to show us "the way we live now," which is the classic novel's function but which the classic novel can't do anymore. Normal human existence today doesn't occur in the classic novel's milieu, which was a largely natural world mitigated by culture. Even in John D. MacDonald's 1960s thrillers, the characters interacted in piney woods, cypress strands, and turtle glass flats as well as marinas, high rises, and condos. But-- in Didion's book-- the motels, airports, hospitals, marinas, high rises and condos have pretty much blocked out the other stuff, as far as most human activity goes. So the traditional dramatic narrative becomes artificial, sentimental, as she says. The "natural" way to describe such activity is as reports, dossiers, files, as in this book. Now, instead of mitigating nature, culture has begun to mimic nature's more lethal abstract qualities-- predation, storms, temblors. That might seem an "end to nature," as the popular catchword has it. But, as Didion's fascination with disasters implies, nature is still out there, behind the seawalls, as she might say: "waiting."