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by Charles McCarry
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Thrillers & Suspense
  • Author:
    Charles McCarry
  • ISBN:
    0786170751
  • ISBN13:
    978-0786170753
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Blackstone Audio Inc.; Unabridged edition (April 15, 2006)
  • Subcategory:
    Thrillers & Suspense
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1969 kb
  • ePUB format
    1569 kb
  • DJVU format
    1116 kb
  • Rating:
    4.6
  • Votes:
    649
  • Formats:
    doc lrf docx txt


Charles McCarry (June 14, 1930 – February 26, 2019) was an American writer, primarily of spy fiction, and a former undercover operative for the Central Intelligence Agency whom The Wall Street Journal described in 2013 as the dean of American spy wr. .

Charles McCarry (June 14, 1930 – February 26, 2019) was an American writer, primarily of spy fiction, and a former undercover operative for the Central Intelligence Agency whom The Wall Street Journal described in 2013 as the dean of American spy writers; The New Republic magazine calls him "poet laureate of the CI. ; and Otto Penzler says he has produced some "poetic masterpieces".

The Last Supper" by Charles McCarry is excellent

The Last Supper" by Charles McCarry is excellent. It spans approximately 60 years (though the author is mystifyingly vague about exact years - instead we're treated to "eras. ) from before WWII in cheery/scary 1930s Germany to the God-awful times of McCarthyism in the US, the Cold War, The Vietnam War, and various aftermaths. In my mind, though, the main character in "The Last Supper" is Barney Wolkoweiz, whose personality, grossness and brilliance dominate the book of clever and stupid characters, all of whom are delicately drawn and are oh-so-different one from the other. In a sense, the story has heavy psychological overtones and themes. Charles McCarry continues his saga of CIA operative, Paul Christopher, with this fine novel that further develops characters and plotlines begun in his earlier work, Tears of Autumn.

The Last Supper book. Perhaps the most richly complex of McCarry’s renowned Paul Christopher novels, The Last Supper is an epic recreation of the history of an organization ensnared by a culture of conspiracy, deceit, and senseless violence. On a rainy night in Paris, Paul Christopher’s lover Molly Benson falls victim to a vehicular homicide minutes after Christopher boards a jet to Vietnam.

American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. The last supper : a novel. by. McCarry, Charles.

To explain this senseless murder, The Last Supper goes back not only to the earliest days of Christopher's life, but also to the origins of the CIA. Moving seamlessly from tales of refugee smuggling in Nazi Germany to OSS-coordinated guerrilla warfare in Burma and the confusion o. Moving seamlessly from tales of refugee smuggling in Nazi Germany to OSS-coordinated guerrilla warfare in Burma and the confusion of the Vietnam War, McCarry creates an intimate history of this shadow-world of deceit and betrayal. Thriller & Crime. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Charles McCarry is the author, most recently, of the acclaimed thriller Old Boys

Charles McCarry is the author, most recently, of the acclaimed thriller Old Boys. He established an international reputation as a novelist with the publication of his worlwide bestseller The tears of Autumn in 1975 and is the author of nine other critically acclaimed novels, including The Miernik Dossier. Библиографические данные. Издание: перепечатанное.

On a rainy night in Paris, Paul Christopher's lover Molly Benson falls victim to a vehicular homicide minutes after Christopher boards a jet bound for Vietnam. In his tenth book featuring CIA agent Paul Christopher, Charles McCarry delves into Christopher's past, answering some of the questions which have tantalized readers for decades.

Charles McCarry obituary. American writer and former undercover CIA operative best known for his spy novels. But after his fifth Christopher spy novel, The Last Supper (1983), McCarry changed tack with a generational epic, The Bride of the Wilderness (1988), which charted the history of the Christopher family in colonial and frontier days. This departure from the world of espionage may have contributed to the diminution of his loyal audience, and the mass market for epics of this kind had already been exhausted by John Jakes’s American Bicentennial series and its imitators.

The largest ebook library. If you did not find the book or it was closed, try to find it on the site: GO. Exact matches. Download (EPUB). Читать.

Charles McCarry has been called the best American espionage writer who ever lived. Now, with the re-release of his classic Paul Christopher series, comes The Last Supper, a tour-de-force that traces the evolution of the OSS and the CIA from the aftermath of World War I through World War II, Vietnam, and the Cold War.

To Paul Christopher, the world of espionage had become a region of the mad, in which men and women lived without conviction and were compelled by a craving for conspiracy. But now, he has to find the “mole” in the Outfit and demand justice from enemies, past and present. As he follows the twisting path of this secret American intelligence group, he discovers a trail of betrayal and violence that leads backward to the horrors of the Nazi era and plunges forward beyond the Vietnam War’s labyrinth of lies.


Ganthisc
"The Last Supper" is the climactic volume of the Paul Christopher Series. As an espionage novel, it's startling -- the betrayal of the CIA's master spy by the agency's most notorious agent, leading to ten years in a Chinese prison, the death of Chrisopher's lover, and the transformation of his life and his agency. But it's also a book about families, the Hubbards and the Christophers, two New England families whose American roots go back to the 18th century -- representatives of a very different time in American life, and in its government, when a resume and a degree meant much less than whether you knew someone could be depended upon. Trust mattered. Personal confidentiality was vital. People knew each other as much by blood as by credentials -- the world of FDR, Wild Bill Donovan, a world that vanishes as the Christopher series progresses. "Last Supper" is a long read. It has scene development more familiar to readers of Faulkner and James than to those of Len Deighton. Characters develop; conversations over a lusciously described meal are complex, engaged with issues and tactics on the one hand, and ancient friendships and their betrayal on the other. If Le Carre had not been so bitter about the United States, he might have written novels like this one, where the spies fumble and fail as much as they do in the English writer's stories, but to a purpose the author is not embarrassed to have participated in himself as a CIA agent for almost twenty years. McCarry's best spy novel is "The Secret Lovers," but his best book is this one, available on Kindle now, and in a new edition. Check it out.
Cha
"The Last Supper" by Charles McCarry is excellent. It spans approximately 60 years (though the author is mystifyingly vague about exact years -- instead we're treated to "eras.") from before WWII in cheery/scary 1930s Germany to the God-awful times of McCarthyism in the US, the Cold War, The Vietnam War, and various aftermaths.

The key to it all is the extraordinary (and slightly weird) Christopher family, whose names and relationships I was constantly getting confused by. But they are spies extraordinaire. In my mind, though, the main character in "The Last Supper" is Barney Wolkoweiz, whose personality, grossness and brilliance dominate the book of clever and stupid characters, all of whom are delicately drawn and are oh-so-different one from the other. In a sense, the story has heavy psychological overtones and themes. Often the Chrisophers are portrayed as observers, virtually silent, but lethally-smart quiet.

Paul Christopher, the exceedingly taciturn (actual) main character on whose back the story resides, is brilliant, observant and fearless. He also seems able to move from one love "relationship" to another with alacrity. The prison scenes in China were among the very best sections of the book.

Caution to readers. Pay close attention to ALL the characters, no matter how few pages are devoted to them and all their activities. It all matters and eventually comes round in the end to make sense, as Paul finally solves the mystery of who spies on whom and why. In that sense the story often reads more like a mystery story than a spy novel.

All-in-all the tale is quite fine, engrossing, mysterious, hideous (at times) and suitably action-bloody. Dialgue is excellent, and the mid-1900s history lesson alone is worth reading. For those of us old enough to have experienced most of this time span, it was a nice blast from the past.

I long suspected who the mole in the CIA really was, but the end solution wa creative and still suspenseful.

A great read; a 4.6, so rounded up to a 5.
Kakashkaliandiia
Charles McCarry continues his saga of CIA operative, Paul Christopher, with this fine novel that further develops characters and plotlines begun in his earlier work, Tears of Autumn. Christopher returns to Viet Nam in an attempt to intercede and prevent the forces that may bring harm to his beloved Molly in reaction to the discoveries Christopher made regarding the Kennedy assassination in Tears of Autumn. Tragedy follows and Christopher ends up in a Chinese prison.

The novel expands the history of Christopher's extraordinary parents in Nazi Germany, and also gives the terrific back-story of Barney Wolkowicz, the wild and wooly Ukrainian-born blue-collar-agent-in-an-Ivy-League-world, the least pretentious and most effective anti-Soviet CIA operative, and devoted protege to Paul's father, Hubbard Christopher.

In fact, this is a character-heavy novel, with a great deal of examination and understanding of the various types and classes of people drawn into Cold War espionage.

There is much of death and loss and ultimate betrayal. The search for Moles within the Outfit and the surprising revelations that come with their discovery. There is the lingering memory of lost loved ones and McCarry does very nicely in limning the emotions of familial love and attachment, as well as adult physical and emotional love.

The descriptions of WWII Burmese jungle fighting, of the tense fear of Nazi ruled Germany, the harsh deprivations of Chinese prison, the privileged landscape of Yalie New England and DC, and the intrigue of Cold War Berlin are brought to life with care and detail.

Not a fast-paced thriller, although abundant enough with exotic locale and adventure, McCarry's interest lies in the people doing this work, and the emotional and psychic price paid in entering the Hall of Mirrors that is espionage. Fine work. Worthwhile. 4-1/2 Stars.