Download The Fire fb2

by Susan Denaker,Katherine Neville
Download The Fire fb2
Thrillers & Suspense
  • Author:
    Susan Denaker,Katherine Neville
  • ISBN:
    0739357085
  • ISBN13:
    978-0739357088
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Random House Audio; Abridged edition (October 14, 2008)
  • Subcategory:
    Thrillers & Suspense
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1506 kb
  • ePUB format
    1799 kb
  • DJVU format
    1324 kb
  • Rating:
    4.4
  • Votes:
    581
  • Formats:
    mbr lit txt lrf


eMusic - Audiobook (Downloadable format): ww. ksrv. Random House Audio 9780739357095 Suspense & Thriller Fiction Mystery & Suspense Katherine Neville Susan Denaker. Release date: 14 October 2008.

eMusic - Audiobook (Downloadable format): ww.

Written by Katherine Neville. Narrated by Susan Denaker. Katherine Neville's groundbreaking novel, The Eight, dazzled audiences more than twenty years ago and set the literary stage for the epic thriller. A quest for a mystical chess service that once belonged to Charlemagne, it spans two centuries and three continents, and intertwines historic and modern plots, archaeological treasure hunts, esoteric riddles, and puzzles encrypted with clues from the ancient past.

S2 E78: Lawrence O'Donnell, Author of Playing With Fire.

Fresh ebook deals, delivered daily. Be the first to know-. New deals hatch every day! Praise for the writing of katherine neville. With alchemical skill, Neville blends modern romance, historical fiction, and medieval myster. nd comes up with gold. A fascinating piece of entertainment that manages to be both vibrant and cerebral. Few will find it resistible. Daring, original, and moving, seems destined to become a cult classic.

Katherine Neville, Susan Denaker (Narrator). I've already blogged about how Katherine Neville out-Dan Brown before Dan Brown was even Dan Brown, but in "The Fire" there is not even a single element of mystique that made "The Eight" so ahead of its time

Katherine Neville, Susan Denaker (Narrator). Katherine Neville’s groundbreaking novel, The Eight, dazzled audiences more than twenty years ago and set the literary stage for the epic thriller. I've already blogged about how Katherine Neville out-Dan Brown before Dan Brown was even Dan Brown, but in "The Fire" there is not even a single element of mystique that made "The Eight" so ahead of its time. well, I still wouldn't recommend it.

By Katherine Neville Read by Susan Denaker. A TALK WITH KATHERINE NEVILLE Author of THE FIRE Question: It’s been twenty years since The Eight. Why did it take so long to write THE FIRE?

By Katherine Neville Read by Susan Denaker. By Katherine Neville Read by Susan Denaker. Why did it take so long to write THE FIRE?

Katherine Neville is the NY Times and Internationally bestselling author of The Eight, A Calculat. January will mark the 10th Anniversary of THE FIRE receiving The Nautilus Award in Fiction/Visionary Fiction.

Katherine Neville is the NY Times and Internationally bestselling author of The Eight, A Calculat.

Katherine Neville is an American author who writes adventure/quest novels. Her novels include The Eight (1988), A Calculated Risk (1992), The Magic Circle (1998) and The Fire (2008), which is a sequel to The Eight

Katherine Neville is an American author who writes adventure/quest novels. Her novels include The Eight (1988), A Calculated Risk (1992), The Magic Circle (1998) and The Fire (2008), which is a sequel to The Eight. Katherine Neville was born in the midwest and attended college in Colorado, doing postgraduate studies in African literature. She then moved to New York City and began a career in the computer field working for IBM in transportation and energy.

Mobile version (beta). If you did not find the book or it was closed, try to find it on the site: GO. Exact matches.

Katherine Neville is the undisputed queen of the international suspense genre. THE FIRE is a follow-up to Ms. Neville’s novel, THE EIGHT, and features many characters from that book, namely Cat Velis and Alexander Solarin, who is now her husband. Steve Berry, author of The Charlemagne Pursuit. For fans of The Da Vinci Code and The Rule of Four, Neville’s historical detective story. packs an epic wallop. The Fire impresses as much for its literary aspects as it does for its action, puzzles and suspense. This story centers around their daughter, Alexandra.

Katherine Neville’s groundbreaking novel, The Eight, dazzled audiences more than twenty years ago and set the literary stage for the epic thriller. A quest for a mystical chess service that once belonged to Charlemagne, it spans two centuries and three continents, and intertwines historic and modern plots, archaeological treasure hunts, esoteric riddles, and puzzles encrypted with clues from the ancient past. Now the electrifying global adventure continues, in Neville’s long anticipated sequel: THE FIRE2003, Colorado: Alexandra Solarin is summoned home to her family’s ancestral Rocky Mountain hideaway for her mother’s birthday. Thirty years ago, her parents, Cat Velis and Alexander Solarin, believed that they had scattered the pieces of the Montglane Service around the world, burying with them the secrets of the power that comes with possessing it. But Alexandra arrives to find that her mother is missing and that a series of strategically placed clues, followed swiftly by the unexpected arrival of a mysterious assortment of houseguests, indicates that something sinister is afoot. When she inadvertently discovers from her aunt, the chess grandmaster Lily Rad, that the most powerful piece of Charlemagne’s service has suddenly resurfaced and the Game has begun again, Alexandra is swept into a journey that takes her from Colorado to the Russian wilderness and at last into the heart of her own hometown: Washington D.C.1822, Albania: Thirty years after the French Revolution, when the chess service was unearthed, all of Europe hovers on the brink of the War of Greek Independence. Ali Pasha, the most powerful ruler in the Ottoman Empire, has angered the sultan and is about to be attacked by Turkish forces. Now he sends the only person he can rely upon–his young daughter, Haidee–on a dangerous mission to smuggle a valuable relic out of Albania, through the mountains and over the sea, to the hands of the one man who might be able to save it.Haidee’s journey from Albania to Morocco to Rome to Greece, and into the very heart of the Game, will result in revelations about the powerful chess set and its history that will lead at last to the spot where the service was first created more than one thousand years before: Baghdad.Blending exquisite prose and captivating history with nonstop suspense, Neville again weaves an unforgettable story of peril, action, and intrigue.From the Hardcover edition.

Miromice
THE FIRE is a follow-up to Ms. Neville’s novel, THE EIGHT, and features many characters from that book, namely Cat Velis and Alexander Solarin, who is now her husband. This story centers around their daughter, Alexandra. Like her father, she’s a chess prodigy, but when the book opens, she hasn’t played in years. I won’t discuss the circumstances of why because it’s a huge spoiler—and there are a few additional shocking plot twists along the way, so keep reading. You’ll definitely want to get to the end. As in THE EIGHT, the characters are caught up in a hunt for pieces from a famous (and fictitious) chess set that dates back hundreds of years and is entwined with alchemical mysteries. Alexandra must join forces with an adversary from her childhood, Ukrainian Chess Master Vartan Azov, who’s also not-too-shabby in the looks department. There’s secrecy, riddles, science, mysticism, and a dash of romance, along with a dual story set in 1822 that eventually intersects with modern day. The ending was a bit too obscure for me, but Ms. Neville has written a clever plot populated with engaging characters. I was quite swept away with the story!
Amis
I read The Eight.Twice, in fact, and I loved it. But this sequel just didn't hit the same sweet spot for me. I found myself wanting to put it down and not come back.
Although the first chapter seems promising, and draws the reader into the tale with a sense of immediacy, in the end the characters become slightly cardboard--including Lily, who all but upstaged the main characters in The Eight. The plot is just a little over-blown and unbelievable (even with suspension of disbelief in full swing), and the storyline increasingly lacks something in the "compulsive read" department.
It felt all through the book as though there were loose ends dangling here and there...things that should have been more or less clear, or perhaps more or less elaborated upon. Perhaps there were simply too many undeveloped characters?
Whatever it is, I cannot give this book more than 2 stars, and that's a disappointment to me....
Nea
I highly recommend that you read The Eight before reading this book. (The Eight is one of my favorite books, so I give it a big "thumbs up" even if you don't read this one.) The reason you need to read The Eight first is that it will be difficult to understand the significance of the events in The Fire if you don't. You need to know what came before in greater detail than is presented in the telegraphic retellings of the plot in The Fire. Neville clearly was writing this for fans of the first book.

Unfortunately, the current crop of characters is not as well-drawn...with the notable exception of Nokomis Key, who was more of the heir to Cat Velis and Solarin (from The Eight) than their daughter, Xie, the main character of The Fire. The interweaving of the plot lines from different time periods did not work as well as in the first book, especially the part from the 17th century. The whole Black vs White side thing was also a mess, but maybe that was the point. The bottom line is that I found it hard to care about the characters or the outcome of the plot.

Judging by the other reviews, the numerous mistakes in my Kindle version were not flukes...lines repeated....weird spacing and hyphenation of words....illegible quotations at the beginnings of the chapters (because they were graphics and not text and thus could not be enlarged). I don't think anything was left out, but the number of mistakes was hard to ignore and really did intrude upon my enjoyment of the book. This was the first book I read on Kindle. Fortunately, the other Kindle books I've read do not seem to be as fraught with errors as this one.
Very Old Chap
This book was a disappointment for me. It is hard for me to explain why. I have read all of Neville's books and The Eight more than once. The story lacks some of the the depth of her other books. The characters are not as exciting and I think it lacks action or maybe it ust moves slow. The idea of her daughter being the main character of the book and being drawn into the "game" is interesting. It's hard for me to figure out just why this book disappoints me.
Ahieones
Good book for a winter's evening, or spring time sunny porch read. Bought it for my sister who LOVED it!
Cordaron
The first part, “the eight” it’s amazing. One of my all time favorite. This one seems like a mess, with a plot that doesn’t leave you feeling like the first does. I enjoy reading, but the adventure in the book seems to be buried among the all knowing, boring characters.
Tyler Is Not Here
I'll begin by saying that I loved Katherine Neville's three previous books -- I even read them multiple times. I have been hoping for many years that she would write another book. "The Eight" is my favorite of her books and I read it every year or so. However, having just finished "the Fire" I now wonder if "The Eight" is as good as I remember? Surely it really was that great because I can remember loaning that book out to a friend and it not returning for about a year because other people would glance through it and get completely hooked...

Don't get me wrong, "the Fire" is not a terrible book. It started off great and I was hooked. Like the previous novel, the use of present and historic perspectives was captivating... But somehow most of the characters never developed enough for me to love them. There were a few characters in the past that showed great potential but they were discarded for other characters. The historic story isn't really a narrative, but more a set of disconnected vignettes. The characters in the present story were also generally not around enough to get to know and unfortunately Xie was almost entirely a puzzle solver and not a person.

In the end, though there is mystery and a little bit of suspense, I think this book was a pleasant story that was bogged down at the end because of a Great Message the author wanted to bestow upon us. (maybe I'm just more a fan of subtle moral lessons)