Download Kingdom Come fb2

by Jim Hougan
Download Kingdom Come fb2
Thrillers & Suspense
  • Author:
    Jim Hougan
  • ISBN:
    0345433246
  • ISBN13:
    978-0345433244
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Ballantine Books; 1st edition (January 4, 2000)
  • Pages:
    352 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Thrillers & Suspense
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1670 kb
  • ePUB format
    1873 kb
  • DJVU format
    1386 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    278
  • Formats:
    mbr rtf mobi lit


Kingdom Come utilizes themes that have become familiar territory after the publication of the very popular "DaVinci Code"

Kingdom Come utilizes themes that have become familiar territory after the publication of the very popular "DaVinci Code". 6 people found this helpful.

Kingdom Come utilizes themes that have become familiar territory after the publication of the very popular "DaVinci Code"

Kingdom Come utilizes themes that have become familiar territory after the publication of the very popular "DaVinci Code".

The author, Jim Hougan also writes with his wife, under the name John Case. I have read and liked all their books. I liked this book as well.

Jim Hougan has won awards for his investigative journalism.

As a CIA agent "without official cover" in London, Jack Dunphy sets up commercial fronts and banking facilities abroad for unsavory clients with money too hot to handle-a lucrative business that allows him to spy under a false identity. Jim Hougan has won awards for his investigative journalism. He is the author of three nonfiction books: Decadence, about the sixties into seventies; Spooks, about the American intelligence community; and Secret Agenda about Watergate.

ISBN 10: 0345433246 ISBN 13: 9780345433244. Publisher: Ballantine Books, 2000.

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This is a stunning international thriller of psychology and conspiracy, espionage and prophecy, history and suspense

I really liked this book. Unlike the Dan Brown book, the writing was very good. The characters were likable and interesting, and the humor was clever and unexpected and fresh. The process of reading the book was unusually fun - I enjoyed every page. It wasn't like the Dan Brown book where the revelations were interesting but the writing was just awful

Originally published: New York : Ballantine Books, 2000. when a man he has under surveillance is viciously murdered.

Originally published: New York : Ballantine Books, 2000. Back in Washington Dunphy is relegated to a desk job that seems calculated to make him quit. Determined to learn why, Dunphy's investigation uncovers a secret society of world leaders that has shaped history for hundreds of years.

As a CIA agent "without official cover" in London, Jack Dunphy sets up commercial fronts and banking facilities abroad for unsavory clients with money too hot to handle--a lucrative business that allows him to spy under a false identity. But after someone he has under surveillance is brutally slaughtered, Dunphy is immediately ordered back to the U.S. "Don't bother packing, and don't go to your flat. . . . Just take the first flight out."On his return to Langley, Dunphy is relentlessly interrogated and dumped into a tedious desk job that seems calculated to make him quit. Determined to learn why, he uses all his CIA tradecraft on the agency that has turned against him. Gaining access to the murdered man's classified file, Dunphy discovers a cryptic list of names, including reference to the 143rd Surgical Airwing, a military unit that officially doesn't exist. Tracking down a former member of that covert unit, he hears the shocking pieces of an extraordinary story that seem too wild to be true--providing damning evidence of a vast conspiracy deeply entrenched within the CIA.But searching for the truth proves a deadly enterprise when someone close to him is killed. Fearing he is next, Dunphy runs for his very life, from Langley to Paris, Prague to London. With no one else to trust, he turns to Clementine, the girlfriend he was forced to abandon when he fled England. Pursued by CIA agents out for blood and a ruthless former client out for vengeance, following a twisted trail of lies and denial, Dunphy uncovers the existence of a clandestine fraternity whose origins are ancient . . . and connections are global. Embroiled in a plot far more elaborate than they ever could have imagined, with players too powerful and consequences too deadly, Dunphy and Clementine must unlock the secret of the Society's dark mission--before it consumes them in its ferocious rush toward destiny.In a gripping novel that combines brilliantly imagined characters with the machinations behind this century's greatest unexplained mysteries, Jim Hougan has created a stunning international thriller of psychology and intrigue, espionage and prophecy, hairbreadth escapes and endless suspense.

Thomeena
Most might say that Kingdom Come are Zeppelin Clones. But whatever the case I DON'T CARE because this band is awesome!! I too have heard bands who sound like bands and I can say this band is musically talented in every respect. Kingdom Come has great songs #1, perhaps better songs than the bands that sound like Kingdom Come. Truthfully this album was under scrutiny right from the start yet it should have been milestone in metal. So now that I said all that it’s now 2018 where I have noticed a different tune coming from those who dedicate themselves to the art of heavy metal. The album today seems to be getting high praise so what has changed? It’s simple… people are just opening up their ears to great sounding music of yesterday, and this is a great sounding album. Buy Vinyl.
Vushura
First things first. Ive always loved Zep they woke me up in the early 70's. Kingdom Come is no early Zep however they do sound like Zep in the later years to a point. I'd say its the vocals of Lenny Wolf that sells the biggest Zep comparison, because he can sound a whole lot like Robert Plant and theres nothing wrong with that.

That being said Kingdom Come can stand on their own talent merit and sound. This is a heck of a band. Im a new comer to Kingdom and I love what Im hearing I bought the cd In Your Face first because it was locally available and Im a fool for a cover with a speaker on the front of it and a bold title such as In Your Face! I did no wrong , In Your Face is a great cd, Id heard Kingdom Come S/T before with some beers in the blood and wondered if what I had heard was really that good. Well it is !

So if your wondering about this band, lay your doubts aside and pick up both of these cds. Your in for a treat with a band that sounds like it stides on perfection, and throwing out some darn good rocking tunes in doing so.
GAZANIK
I take pride in being the one at my high school who discovered Kingdom Come and introduced them to my friends, (at least the ones who had a bit of musical taste and weren't listening to mc hammer). Noticed the resemblance to LedZep straight away but that was never a negative. These guys may have been deeply inspired by the all-mighty ones but they took that inspiration and created a truly unique, emotionally charged, socks off rocking original sound of epic proportions. To all the haters, get out of ya holy house and just enjoy the music man.
Mariwyn
Jim Hougan writes with the consummate skill of someone who's published five novels, not one. (Which makes me think he has four unpublished manuscripts piled in a closet somewhere.) His technique--dialogue, action, plot pacing, setting descriptions--are perfect, detailed and believable. And unlike other Bond-like protagonists we're used to seeing, his characterizations are three-dimensional. The book is written on many levels--intellectual down to the gut-wrenching (and gut-bleeding) physical--and thus is accessible to a wide audience. It's especially suited for those of us conspiracy theorists who search for the dark underbelly of current events; Hougan has us believing that his story could be at least partially true. The cover art is, appropriately, of a labyrinth; the main character, Jack Dunphy, is like a rat trying to navigate through a strange maze of information and danger. Reading about how Dunphy gets through it--fake passports, sneaky bank transactions, and the occasional dagger flashing from the cloak--is worth the price in eye strain and lost sleep.
Pumpit
Whether writting under his psuedonym John Case with his wife, or going solo, Jim Hougan has a definite gift for creating likeable characters who get caught up in the unexpected while carrying out seemingly dronelike yet out of the ordinary jobs. Hougan's main man in "Kingdom Come", Jack Dunphy has been relegated to glorified information gopher at Langley after having been pulled off an undercover assignment in London after the death of an Oxford Professor of Jungian psychology whom he had under surveillance. Dunphy's annoyance at being yanked from his cozy nest with British sweetie Clementine enhanced by the frustratingly endless grunt work of public information gathering lead him to buck the system and uncover the relevance of the professor's death. What he discovers is a Gordian knot of intrigue that eventually threatens his life and the lives of anyone with whom he comes into contact.

As Dunphy plows through clues that take him all over Europe, the reader breathlessly turns page after page, liking Dunphy and his cohorts immediately. The facts that he uncovers make for fascinating reading---puzzlers will enjoy being thrown information seemingly straight out of left field. Unfortunately, as the story leads into its ultimate denouement, it becomes choppy, the ending sequences beginning at the estate within the Swiss National Park and the ending voyage at sea seem rushed and not fully thought out, as if the author had run out of steam and simply wanted to finish the story under 400 pages. The last paragraph leads the reader to believe some sort of transference has taken place, but obviously this is certainly not developed and there seems no hint of a part two where the reader can stretch his imagination further.

Kingdom Come utilizes themes that have become familiar territory after the publication of the very popular "DaVinci Code". But in as much as that novel also rushes the reader in and out of intriguing snippets of history replete with secret societies, it does come to a fairly complete, if not predictable, conclusion--not so with "Kingdom Come"---the protoganists accomplish their missions, but the ending seems to grasp at something not quite touched upon in the main body of the work. I would have liked to have read more information regarding the gentleman introduced at the tail end of the novel, perhaps even a concurrent historical story running parallel to the actual action tale. Perhaps then, I would have felt that the ending had some meaning in terms of this gentleman's characterization and overall fit into the overall scheme of things. The focus should have been on him and not the Pound/Dulles affair showcased by the author. As with the "John Case" selections, Hougan again seems to fall into the trap of simply using his book to over-instruct his readers on trivia that while fun has little to do with the overall outcome of the story. Providing a reading guide at the back of the book would definitely be a plus for those readers who want more information and do wish to read further.

Nevertheless Hougan presents a great page-turner for at least 7/8's of the book's journey and I will recommend it with some reluctance to anyone who likes a quick read with some fun historical mysteries thrown in.