Download The Complaints fb2

by Ian Rankin
Download The Complaints fb2
Mystery
  • Author:
    Ian Rankin
  • ISBN:
    031607876X
  • ISBN13:
    978-0316078764
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Reagan Arthur / Back Bay Books; Reprint edition (November 2, 2011)
  • Pages:
    480 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Mystery
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1166 kb
  • ePUB format
    1492 kb
  • DJVU format
    1181 kb
  • Rating:
    4.8
  • Votes:
    729
  • Formats:
    txt mbr lrf azw


Critical acclaim for Ian Rankin. Because Rankin is a master story-teller, that means the reader is quickly swept up and carried along.

Critical acclaim for Ian Rankin.

Ian Rankin has been elected a Hawthornden Fellow, and is also a past winner of the Chandler-Fulbright Award. Ian Rankin, The Complaints. Thank you for reading books on BookFrom. He is the recipient of four Crime Writers’ Association Dagger Awards including the prestigious Diamond Dagger in 2005. In 2004, Ian won America’s celebrated Edgar Award for Resurrection Men. He has also been shortlisted for the Anthony Award in the USA, won Denmark’s Palle Rosenkrantz Prize, the French Grand Prix du Roman Noir and the Deutscher Krimipreis.

On the evidence of THE COMPLAINTS it looks as if Fox will be just as sure-footed a guide to the city as his grizzled predecessor' DAILY EXPRESS. Ian Rankin has been elected a Hawthornden Fellow, and is also a past winner of the Chandler-Fulbright Award. He is the recipient of four CWA Daggers including the prestigious Diamond Dagger in 2005. In 2004, Ian won America's celebrated Edgar Award.

In THE COMPLAINTS, Rankin proves again why he is one of the world's most beloved and bestselling crime writers, mixing unstoppable pacing with the deeper question of who decides right from wrong.

The Black Book is a 1993 crime novel by Ian Rankin, the fifth of the Inspector Rebus novels. It is the first book to feature Siobhan Clarke and Morris Gerald Cafferty appears as a main character. It is also the first book where Rebus is based at St Leonards police station. Rebus finds himself with a number of problems on his hands.

Praise for Ian Rankin ‘Arguably no Scottish novelist since Sir Walter Scott has had the commercial and critical success that Ian Rankin now enjoys. The Complaints – paperback – ebook. Writing as Jack Harvey. He may even be said to have invented modern. Witch Hunt – paperback – ebook.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30. Quantity:1. The Complaints has been added to your Basket.

Ian Rankin The Complaints Friday 6 February 2009 1 Monday 9 February 2009 2 3 Tuesday 10 February .

Ian Rankin The Complaints Friday 6 February 2009 1 Monday 9 February 2009 2 3 Tuesday 10 February 2009 4 5 Wednesday 11 February 2009 6 7 8 Thursday 12 February 2009 9 10 Friday 13 February 2009 11 12 Saturday 14 February 2009 13 Sunday 15 February 2009 14 Monday 16 February 2009 15 16 17 Tuesday 17 February 2009 18 1. In 2004, Ian won America ’s celebrated Edgar Award for Resurrection Men.

Complaints and Conduct Department, to give them their full title, but known colloquially as ’the Dark Side’, or simply ’The . Malcolm Fox works for The Complaints. He’s just had a result, and should be feeling good about himself.

Complaints and Conduct Department, to give them their full title, but known colloquially as ’the Dark Side’, or simply ’The Complaints’. But he’s middle-aged, sour and unwell. He also has a father in a care home and a sister who persists in an abusive relationship. In the midst of an aggressive Edinburgh winter, the reluctant Fox is given a new task. There’s a cop called Jamie Breck, and he’s dirty

Nobody likes The Complaints--they're the cops who investigate other cops. It's a department known within the force as "The Dark Side," and it's where Malcolm Fox works. He's a serious man with a father in a nursing home and a sister who persists in an abusive relationship, frustrating problems about which he cannot seem to do anything. Then the reluctant Fox is given a new case. There's a cop named Jamie Breck, and he's dirty. The problem is, no one can prove it. As Fox takes on the job, he learns that there's more to Breck than anyone thinks--dangerous knowledge, especially when a vicious murder takes place far too close to home.In THE COMPLAINTS, Rankin proves again why he is one of the world's most beloved and bestselling crime writers, mixing unstoppable pacing with the deeper question of who decides right from wrong.

Mr.jeka
I admit that I'm a newbie to Ian Rankin. I've not read any of the previous series that many reviewers are rueing the end of, so I came to "The Complaints" totally not knowing what to expect. I will also admit I've not been a huge "mystery" or "detective" fiction fan. All that being said, I have to say that Rankin's "The Complaints" is simply one of the best pieces of fiction I've read in a long time.
The characters are wonderfully developed so that you think you know them, but he leaves enough out and introduces enough questions that you aren't 100% sure you have things figured out. He has also crafted a very fast paced story, that is really amazingly complex for as fast as it is developed. Also, for a plot that is as complex as this one it, it is extremely easy to follow and not lose track of just who the players are.
In short...great story...wonderfully written with characters you really care about (or dislike, as the case may be) and just when you think you've got it figured out....well, I'm not taking you there...read it for yourself.
Great read. I'm a serious Rankin fan as of this read.
Samowar
It was only recently that I became aware of Ian Rankin and his famous Inspector Rebus book series. Apparently, fans of Inspector Rebus take a dim view of the author retiring that character and introducing a new protagonist, Malcolm Fox. Fortunately, I come to Mr. Rankin's work with fresh eyes. "The Complaints" is the first novel I've read by the Scottish author, but it certainly won't be the last. This is great stuff. The main protagonist, Malcolm Fox, as well as the other characters who inhabit "The Complaints" feel extremely real. I don't like giving away plot material while reviewing novels, so I will stick to generalities.

The Complaints Department is equivalent to what we in the United States call Internal Affairs. Investigating other suspected cops doesn't exactly make you the most popular character in any police department. This is a great premise to launch a new character. Malcolm Fox, a huge, frumpy, out-of-shape, bear of a man, is more a by-the-books kind of guy who is forced into investigating outside his comfort zone due to, at first, family obligation and then an interdepartmental request. Eventually, he falls into the crosshairs of the unknown antagonist(s). There are plenty of mysteries floating around in the story and it's darned near impossible to figure out whom Fox can trust up until the last, few pages of the book. Also, I found Fox's interactions with his sister and dad to be especially touching.

I seriously don't understand how Mr. Rankin is able to tease out such believable characters by using just words. The story is not some James Bondish sort of tale, but a highly entertaining, gritty, very human whodunit. I absolutely loved it.
Blackbeard
The Complaints is a compelling novel with enough twists and turns and conspiracies to keep me reading without putting the book down. Amidst the contradictions of what it means to be a part of the Complaints unit (cops detecting other cops), the banter and the blunt dismissive behavior of those above, below, and in between the ranks of Malcolm, there are a few great mysteries solved. Ian Rankin did it again.
Eyalanev
Ian Rankin introduces his new character, Malcolm Fox, after Detective Inspector John Rebus retires from the Criminal Investigation Department in Rankin's book, Exit Music. Fox is a cop who investigates other cops. This story is vintage Rankin, well-written, fast-paced, engaging, and intelligent. Character development is just as important if not more so than plot, and the story is one you enjoy picking up where you left off in Exit Music. Well worth it.
Samutilar
A worthy successor to Rebus. In a piece at the end, the author says the characters are different but I found the books fairly similar. Perhaps it is the author's style that made Fox feel like Rebus to me but without the drinking problem.

I read almost exclusively series with continuing characters and Rebus was one of the better ones. At some point I'd thought I'd read everything Rankin had written and forgot to watch for new titles. I'm glad I found The Complaints and look forward to reading what follows.
Blacknight
The author sets aside Inspector Rebus and introduces Inspector Malcolm Fox of Complaints and Conduct at the Lothian and Borders Police Headquarters in Edinburgh, Scotland. It is what police departments in the US would call Internal Affairs. They are not well regarded by other police because they are investigating their colleagues. In this case there is some backlash. He is not quite sure why, but he is being drawn into some internal intrigue within the department and finds himself under suspension. He makes some new friends, but you can never be sure of that. There is an old expression in the US, when a rattlesnake bites you in the behind, you find out who your friends are.

The case has many complexities, involving the murder of his sister's significant other and questions about that man's activities, an investigation that has mysterious origins, police who have grudges against Malcolm Fox, business dealings involving cash from unknown origins, the economic and housing meltdown, and various criminal activities.

It is an interesting story, and gives you a different look at the police. Malcolm is a bit of a lone wolf who might rank up there with Harry Callahan but, as typical with English mysteries, guns don't figure into the equation. It is make-my-day of a different type involving shoe leather, high tech, and maybe some pepper spray if needed.