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by David Pirie
Download The Patient's Eyes: The Dark Beginnings of Sherlock Holmes fb2
Mystery
  • Author:
    David Pirie
  • ISBN:
    0312290950
  • ISBN13:
    978-0312290955
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    Minotaur Books; 1 edition (May 13, 2002)
  • Pages:
    256 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Mystery
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1907 kb
  • ePUB format
    1410 kb
  • DJVU format
    1817 kb
  • Rating:
    4.5
  • Votes:
    424
  • Formats:
    lit docx txt mobi


Treading that same critically acclaimed ground, The Patient's Eyes is the first in a stand-alone cycle of novels written from Doyle's point of view . Tense and dramatic The Patient's Eyes marks the debut of a brilliant new crime novelist.

Treading that same critically acclaimed ground, The Patient's Eyes is the first in a stand-alone cycle of novels written from Doyle's point of view that include a whole new perspective on the adventures of Bell and Doyle and the genesis of the best-known detective in all of mystery literature.

The patients eyes the d. .And so it was that I put my work aside and scanned the Sherlock Holmes adventure ‘The Speckled Band’ for the first time in years

The patients eyes the d.The Patient's Eyes: The Dark Beginnings of Sherlock Holmes, . And so it was that I put my work aside and scanned the Sherlock Holmes adventure ‘The Speckled Band’ for the first time in years. What struck me most, reading it after so long, was its sheer wish-fulfilme.

Doyle, Arthur Conan, Sir, 1859-1930, Bell, Joseph, 1837-1911, Private investigators. New York : St. Martin's Paperbacks. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Gutierres on July 1, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

The Patient's Eyes book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

The Patient's Eyes book. It is to you that I owe Sherlock Holmes. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Patient's Eyes: The Dark Beginnings of Sherlock Holmes as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Full recovery of all data can take up to 2 weeks! So we came to the decision at this time to double the download limits for all users until the problem is completely resolved. Thanks for your understanding! Progress: 9. 3% restored. Главная The Patient's Eyes: The Dark Beginnings of Sherlock Holmes. The Patient's Eyes: The Dark Beginnings of Sherlock Holmes.

Doyle, Arthur Conan, Sir, 1859-1930, Bell, Joseph, 1837-1911, Physicians. Martin's Minotaur. Gutierres on August 29, 2011.

I've finished a book by David Pirie called The Patient's Eyes which is a mystery starrning not Sherlock Holmes and . Dr. Bell is widely believed to be the inspiration for Sherlock Holmes.

I've finished a book by David Pirie called The Patient's Eyes which is a mystery starrning not Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson, but Arthur Conan Doyle (pre-writing days) and Dr. Joseph Bell, who was Doyle's medical mentor at the University of Edinburgh - that's historical truth. Doyle's position as Bell's clerk introduce him to Bell's confidential investigative work with the police and his controversial methods of deduction. Pirie offers Doyle's reflection on his relationship with Dr. Bell and the differences between their relationship and that of Holmes and Dr. Watson.

The Patient's Eyes: The Dark Beginnings of Sherlock Holmes. Pirie's third novel, like its predecessors, The Patient's Eyes and The Night Calls, evokes the spirit of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories with a gripping plot and psychologically sophisticated characters. The Night Calls: The Dark Beginnings of Sherlock Holmes. Again, Doyle plays the Watson role to the Holmes of Dr. Joseph Bell, the real-life inspiration for the master detective. Doyle is a complex, wounded figure, still struggling with the loss of his beloved at the hands of a madman, Dr. Thomas Neill Cream.

David Pirie is the author of two other Arthur Conan Doyle novels, The Patient's Eyes and < I The Dark Water. The Night Calls' is first and foremost a thoroughly atmospheric, not to mention a completely absorbing, story. Each setting and scene is described in careful detail, which lends the prose a rich density that manages to escape any sense of being cumbersome.

Excellent story of the dark beginnings of Sherlock Holmes. Published by Thriftbooks. David Pirie's "The Patient's Eyes" is the first in a series of books about the collaboration between Arthur Conan Doyle and Joseph Bell

Excellent story of the dark beginnings of Sherlock Holmes. com User, 12 years ago. Written by the screenwriter of the BBC's Murder Rooms, this mystery chronicles Arthur Conan Doyle's first meeting with the eccentric Dr. Joseph Bell. David Pirie's "The Patient's Eyes" is the first in a series of books about the collaboration between Arthur Conan Doyle and Joseph Bell. Doyle is a young medical student in Edinburgh when he meets Bell, who is both a teacher in the medical school and a forensic scientist.

"It is to you that I owe Sherlock Holmes."-Sir Arthur Conan Doyle to his mentor, renowned forensic scientist Dr. Joseph Bell As a young medical student, Arthur Conan Doyle, famously studied under the pioneering forensic detective Dr. Joseph Bell. Taking this as a starting point, author David Pirie has woven a compelling thriller which partners Bell (widely believed to be the model for Sherlock Holmes himself) and Doyle as innovators in criminal investigation, exploring the strange underworld of violence and sexual hypocrisy running below the surface of the Victorian era. When the impoverished young Arthur Doyle opens his first medical practice, he is puzzled by the symptoms presented by Heather Grace, a sweet young woman whose parents have died tragically several years before. Heather has a strange eye complaint, but is also upset by visions of a phantom bicyclist who vanishes as soon as he is followed. This enigma, however, is soon overshadowed as Doyle finds himself embroiled in more threatening events-including the murder of a rich Spanish businessman-that call for the advice of the eminent Dr Bell. But despite coming to Doyle's aid, Dr Bell dismisses the murder of Senor Garcia as a rather unimportant diversion from the incident which Bell considers to have real criminal implications: the matter of the patient's eyes and the solitary cyclist. David Pirie gained rave reviews for his screenplay depicting the "real" Sherlock Holmes, Dr. Joseph Bell, in the two part, Edgar-nominated TV series "Murder Rooms." Treading that same critically acclaimed ground, The Patient's Eyes is the first in a stand-alone cycle of novels written from Doyle's point of view that include a whole new perspective on the adventures of Bell and Doyle and the genesis of the best-known detective in all of mystery literature. Tense and dramatic The Patient's Eyes marks the debut of a brilliant new crime novelist.

Qumenalu
I've finished a book by David Pirie called The Patient's Eyes which is a mystery starrning not Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson, but Arthur Conan Doyle (pre-writing days) and Dr. Joseph Bell, who was Doyle's medical mentor at the University of Edinburgh - that's historical truth. Anyway, what Pirie has done is select ideas and events from the Holmesian canon and re-imagine them as part of the Doyle-Bell adventure so that you see in this story parts of both "The Solitary Cyclist" and "The Speckled Band." Pirie is such a good writer that even though some of his ideas are familiar he hustles the reader along in an exciting, twisting, gothic tale that is well worth the journey.
tref
Purchased as a gift and arrived in brand-new condition, perfect for the new owner! Shipping was very fast and even though I prefer to purchase hardcovers, the soft-cover was very crisp and shiny. A nice buy.
Connorise
Product was described as promised, fast delivery.
Dont_Wory
This is a terrific read - fast paced and complex. I read it in a single sitting, then leafed back through. It's a "keeper" that won't get cycled through the used book store - it'll be read again and again, especially as Pirie promises more in the series. The next in the series will be released in the U.K. in Oct. 2002, and I await it with pleasant anticipation.
Chi
Not the best mystery novel but certainly it was Sherlockian in nature. I will need to read the next installment before I can judge the authors true ability.
Erienan
Actually, the title is misleading but was kept as is, for effect. It should really have been 'Doyle and Bell / Holmes and Holmes.'

First, to dispel any confusion; this is still fiction, it is Mr Pirie's honest and fantastic attempt to give us modern day readers the flavour, albeit oomphed up for the sake of the art, of the type of real cases involving Dr Joseph Bell and pupil of sorts, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. I am not sure if it is part of the hype, it may be, but it may not be, however, according to Mr Pirie and others, there is a box of original case notes involving Bell and Doyle, but the Doyle estate has not in all these decades, centuries even, given permission for their release. But no matter if this is true or not, Mr Pirie here has brought us (not just this but two others as well) books in which we can see, or imagine at least, how Sherlock and John came to be and how they worked. There is one difference, and I am truly sorry if this upsets Conan Doyle fans (I am one myself, or a Sherlockian at least), Mr Pirie writes better than Sir Arthur did. But I don't dwell on this, the excellence comes through a nod to the original author, and his material, so, to keep the peace, we could say a great partnership made possible by the preservation of literature, has brought us this great series.

Now ok, this book and its two companions have been around a decade or so in themselves now, but I still feel class one spoilers presented here would be unfair, especially in the light of a re-igniting of all things Sherlockian due to the manic efforts of Cumbypants and Freeman, on the box, so I will keep the rest of the review very very general indeed.

Ok, the young Arthur Conan Doyle, the young hopeful of an impoverished Edinburgh family, just about manages to pay and attend lectures at Medical School. He comes into contact with the mysterious, short-tempered and not always friendly Dr Joseph Bell, senior lecturer within, consultant pathologist to the police (but tolerated more than welcomed, and sometimes not even that), without.

Bell has his controversial 'method', the very same as that we eventually see in Sherlock Holmes. But he is overly cold, too analytical, and it takes run-ins with and doubt expressed by Doyle, which eventually sees both soften their aloofness and skepticism respectively. Doyle still does not fully accept it as being a truly valid way of proceeding, especially as they both suffer some reversals as they investigate crimes and murders. But as the reader, I think we sympathise more with Bell, and at times we can do nowt but say Doyle's relative youth and inexperience, and pig-headedness of character linked to neither, prevents his being able to appreciate the brilliant methods employed by Bell. Doyle is rather crazily looking for perfection from Bell, or at least from his methods, we know as readers and as intelligent people, that simply cannot be.

Well, I could cover the bare bones (pardon the pun) of this tale and of the other two books, but as stated before, spoilers won't do at this juncture; so all that's left is to say, if you like Doyle / Holmes, you like Victorian crime with forensics and pathology looming large; the ubiquitous seedy back streets and denizens of the towns, then this series is for you, you won't regret buying it and you will love reading it. On a different note, I really am sorry that Ian Richardson passed on relatively young, he did a marvellous job in the TV version - Murder Rooms.
Legend 33
Those who have admired the cases of Sherlock Holmes and found "The 7 Percent Solution" to be a fresh look at the first great detective of popular fiction will find a different game afoot in "The Patient's Eye." The intriguing premise for David Pirie's novel is that Arthur Conan Doyle is playing the Watson role to Dr. Joseph Bell, the writer's real-life mentor in medical school at Edinburough and the model for Holmes. Doyle starts off in the role of Scully, unable to accept that the practice of medicine has anything to do with Dr. Bell's deductive reasoning from minute clues, but in due course he becomes a true believer in Bell's pioneering work in forensic medicine.
The case involves Miss Heather Grace, a young heiress who has been traumatized by an attack by a lunatic who murdered her parents. Now Miss Grace is subject to visions of a figure who follows her on her bicycle. The conceit here is that Pirie is working backwards from several of the cases from the Holmes canon, most obviously "The Solitary Cyclist," but also "The Speckled Band" and "Wisteria Lodge." The idea is that Doyle later fictionalized these stories from the "real" events contained herein. It was a good move on Pirie's part not to simply offer up the "true" story of one the original Holmes mysteries or to try and tackle one of the "biggies" in the canon. There is also more romance than you find in Doyle, what with the young doctor falling for his patient.
Most importantly, Pirie is able to present Doyle and Bell as interesting substitutes for Watson and Holmes. There is no pretense of friendship between the pair; they are teacher and student. Doyle is not as much the inept foil that Watson serves in the stories (indeed, he solves several initial mysteries before getting in over his head) and Bell is arguably more charismatic than the driven Holmes. There are times when Pirie follows the Doyle model too closely and the gallery of suspects is rather overdrawn, but as the first effort in what is clearly going to be a developing series, "The Patient's Eyes" is worth the reading. The execution is not quite up to the ambitious idea, but that is a minor concern. The one caveat is that you should read over the original Sherlock Holmes stories on which this novel is based to better appreciate how Pirie is using them in this story.