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by Stephen Lees
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Mystery
  • Author:
    Stephen Lees
  • ISBN:
    0957162901
  • ISBN13:
    978-0957162907
  • Genre:
  • Publisher:
    SPEL (November 14, 2012)
  • Pages:
    336 pages
  • Subcategory:
    Mystery
  • Language:
  • FB2 format
    1398 kb
  • ePUB format
    1295 kb
  • DJVU format
    1667 kb
  • Rating:
    4.7
  • Votes:
    247
  • Formats:
    lrf doc lit lrf


The Iron Mausoleum book. The story offers an alternative explanation about the fate of the RMS Titanic and is based partly on fiction and on fact and will delight lovers of the Titanic mystery and fans of the Sherlock Holmes stories.

The Iron Mausoleum book. Written in the style of Conan Doyle, T Sherlock Holmes joins forces with his faithful companion Dr Watson in a new adventure story, set in 1911 in a fog-bound London.

I fear that Mr. Sherlock Holmes may become like one of those popular tenors who, having outlived their time, are still tempted to. .It is. Both Holmes and I had a weakness for the Turk- hardly necessary to describe him, for many will. Sherlock Holmes may become like one of those popular tenors who, having outlived their time, are still tempted to make repeated farewell bows to their indulgent audiences. This must cease and he must go the way of all esh, material or imaginary. It was over a smoke in the pleasant las- remember that large, bluff, honest personality, that.

Any who consider 'The Iron Mausoleum' to be in the 'Hawaii' category are in for huge disappointments

Any who consider 'The Iron Mausoleum' to be in the 'Hawaii' category are in for huge disappointments. Readers will find themselves well into the book before wondering if either the plot will coalesce or, more likely, if the book will ever end. This reader began appreciative of the map of London provided and when notified various items in architectural realms would be included thought said items would lend color and depth to the story.

Sherlock Holmes joins forces with his faithful companion Dr Watson in a new adventure story, set in 1911 in a fog-bound .

Sherlock Holmes joins forces with his faithful companion Dr Watson in a new adventure story, set in 1911 in a fog-bound London. This must cease and he must go the way of all flesh, material or imaginary

I fear that Mr. This must cease and he must go the way of all flesh, material or imaginary.

The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes is the final set of twelve (out of a total of fifty-six) Sherlock Holmes short stories by Arthur Conan Doyle first published in the Strand Magazine between October 1921 and April 1927

The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes is the final set of twelve (out of a total of fifty-six) Sherlock Holmes short stories by Arthur Conan Doyle first published in the Strand Magazine between October 1921 and April 1927. However, they had slightly different titles.

How many Sherlock Holmes books did Arthur Conan Doyle write? . Just like most other Sherlock Holmes books, The Return of Sherlock Holmes was also first published in The Strand Magazine with one story.

How many Sherlock Holmes books did Arthur Conan Doyle write? Well, he wrote a total of 9 books about Sherlock Holmes (4 novels and 5 short story collections). And guess what – each book is almost as good as the other. It has the first ever case solved by Sherlock Holmes – when he was still in college. Just like most other Sherlock Holmes books, The Return of Sherlock Holmes was also first published in The Strand Magazine with one story appearing every month. I think The Return of Sherlock Holmes’ 13 stories are a tadless gripping than The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. But they’re still very good.

Sherlock Holmes and the Hentzau Affair. Sherlock Holmes and the Case of Sabina Hall, New York, Simon & Schuster, 1988. Holmes and Roosevelt team up to investigate a crime in NewYork. The book is apocryphal but is remarkably convincing. Romford, Ian Henry, 1991. Apocryphal novel set in 1895. Set in 1882 where Holmes follows up a request from an old college friend. Sherlock Holmes and the Thistle of Scotland, New York, Simon & Schuster, 1989. Set in 1890 where Holmes investigates the theft of a legendary Scottish jewel. The Game is A foot, NewYork, St Martin's Press, 1994.

Both Holmes and I had a weakness for the Turkish bath

Sherlock Holmes joins forces with his faithful companion Dr Watson in a new adventure story, set in 1911 in a fog-bound London. The story offers an alternative explanation about the fate of the RMS Titanic and is based partly on fiction and on fact and will delight lovers of the Titanic mystery and fans of the Sherlock Holmes stories. Written in the style of Conan Doyle, The Iron Mausoleum a case of Sherlock Holmes and the Titanic is - with permission obtained from the Conan Doyle Estate - based on the characters and places created by Conan Doyle and therefore are familiar - if interpreted slightly differently. The story begins when Sir James Walter, the Head of the Marine Department at the Admiralty, visits Holmes in Baker Street. He tells of the suspicious death of a clerk who worked in the Admiralty offices in Whitehall and tries to persuade a reluctant Holmes to investigate. Eventually Holmes agrees and with Watson are drawn into a world of criminal conspiracy and murder. We are taken on a journey with Holmes and Watson and witness Holmes' forensic application to solving the mystery of the sinking of the Titanic. Beginning in the atmospheric fog bound streets of London and then Brookwood Necropolis to the Titanic at the Herculaneum Dock in Liverpool and back to London. From scoundrels encountered in the infamous Colony Room Club to wealthy financiers and an American heiress the clues unfold. Told with conviction and humour, the author totally immerses us in this Holmesian world of the early 1900s. Features of the book include a map of Holmes London allowing the reader to re-trace the footsteps of Holmes and Watson on their various journeys through the fog-bound Metropolis. Drawings by the author of some of the buildings, which feature in the novel, giving the reader vital clues in solving the mystery.

Moronydit
There are many novels where the writer seems disorganized, the presentation is disjointed and items of information are seemingly tossed in almost at random. As you read, coherence begins to emerge, plots and themes become clearer and you start seeing how seemingly random elements were important to what is being presented. Further reading takes you where the information is coming together and you are anxious to get to the next pages until you find yourself reading as fast as you can because the story has turned out to be that good. I place James Michener's 'Hawaii' in that category. Early on it appears to be vague ramblings but it soon becomes a barn burner.

Any who consider 'The Iron Mausoleum' to be in the 'Hawaii' category are in for huge disappointments. Readers will find themselves well into the book before wondering if either the plot will coalesce or, more likely, if the book will ever end. This reader began appreciative of the map of London provided and when notified various items in architectural realms would be included thought said items would lend color and depth to the story. Talk about swinging and missing. Much information was tossed in seemingly at random. You learn the author is a fan of Mahler. That is included with other items of information seemingly sailing in from nowhere along with descriptions of architecture that the author apparently believes readers are already familiar with. What that does is make for large chunks of text that are text that range somewhere between bewildering and incomprehensible.

If like this reviewer, readers may begin to wonder if the author was being paid by the word. Others, if they invest in this book which this reviewer would caution against, would note there is one chapter that could have been deleted completely without any harm being done. When the word 'Disjointed' is used in this review, take it to the bank. Make that two chapters that could have been deleted without harm. In fiction, among the ranks of deadly criminal masterminds ranging from Fu Manchu to Ming the Merciless, Professor James Moriarity is in the top ranks. Wasting a chapter on a genius like Moriarity's constructing a trap where with a little swashbuckling Holmes and Watson could escape boggles the imagination. This places the professor firmly in the ranks of a group of common street thugs which would horrify A. Conan Doyle.

One realm where this reviewer confesses to being flabbergasted beyond belief. First, in due deference to the author, a loud disclaimer. His background includes 36 years of junior high/middle school teaching. Better than half of those years were teaching English. He also has taught statistics and research design on the university level and consulted on a large number of masters' theses and doctoral dissertations. Some may believe that this reviewers belongs in the realm of the stereotypical English teacher wearing the half glasses and brandishing a red pen.

Although this reviewer certainly can swing a red pen, when ordering up this book and the next one in the series, the plan was to read them for enjoyment certainly not to be spending time making their pages look like someone had smashed an overripe pomegranate on them. Yet, immediately into the book errors in grammar kept popping up that made reading difficult. Not difficult for those of us with English credentials but difficult for anyone. Pardon my shouting but,

'It's' DOES NOT MEAN THE SAME THING AS 'Its'

This is totally bewildering. Looking at Mr Lees's academic qualifications they are most impressive. However, someone with legal training and a practicing barrister at law makes scores of errors like this? Maybe Mr Lees deserves to be cut some slack. It could be a language thing. As Mr Lees's bio points out, he is from the US but attended school in England. Possibly he and this reviewer speak different languages as Mr Lees studied English while this reviewer reads, writes and speaks American.

Providing some additional examples may underscore points being made.

Page 271: "...Holmes took the candelabra from me and waived (sic) it..."

Page 289: "...I read the article out allowed (sic) to Holmes..."

Page 290: "...I mumbled whist (sic) pushing more rashers of the smoked bacon into my mouth..."

What's unique about the last example cited, down the same page the author did not confuse 'whist' with whilst'. Go figure. One more while remembering that this reviewer did not read the book intending to do the red-pen shuffle on it. That would rank up there with a labor of Heracles.

Page 306: "...We have to bare (sic) in mind Moriarty's wealth..."

If one of this reviewer's seventh-grade English students would have turned in something of this nature, the appropriate method of dealing with the circumstances would be to quietly pull the student to the side and whisper, "You can tell me. Who REALLY wrote this?" To conclude, in all kindness, this novel is appalling. Although a few things were done pretty nicely, having to wait until the last few pages to finally encounter coherent narratives and adherence to a plot, it is not worth the money spent unless you pick it up at a garage sale for a quarter.

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from earth
I am very annoyed in buying all three books by Mr. Lees. Mr. Lees has a very rambling style mainly about architecture with a little Sherlock Holmes mixed in. If you took out the parts about buildings and concerts and where and what they ate and drank in the three books I doubt if you could come up with 1 complete book. They say on the back that it is in the style of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. It is nowhere near his style and totally changes events that happened in Doyle's stories. It is also upsetting that Mrs. Hudson does not like Sherlock Holmes and Holmes treats Dr. Watson very badly. It is absurd. I do give it 1 star because some of the parts about Sherlock Holmes are interesting when you can wade through the verbage and rambling to get to them. I can not in good conscience tell anyone to get these books.
Washington
I read at least two or three Sherlock Holmes books a month and therefore have read some bad ones but this is the worst. It rambles, it jumps and insults both Holmes,Watson and Mrs. Hudson. I'm thankful I only bought this book intending to buy the others the following month. I can't find anything positive to say on this. With so many other excellent, good, ok or poor Sherlock Holmes books out there I suggest you skip this one.
GWEZJ
Not terrible, but there's nothing really new here. It will be enjoyable to Holmes afficianados, and Titanic fans, but they've seen this Titanic sinking theory before.
snowball
Stephen Lees is a wonderful author! Great Book!
you secret
Not so much as a waist of time but there are so many other better ones to read.